German Shepherds Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi y'all,
Gandalf is about a year and a half now and we've been using a prong collar for a few months now. He walks very nice on the leash, doesn't pull anymore, can't even remember the last time he lunged at something. The prong has caused some significant hair loss around his neck and I don't really feel it's needed anymore since he's not a puller, however he's still young so I do still want some control better than a flat collar and I know flat collars can cause damage if the dog does decide to pull. I've never used a martingale, but they look like they might be a good option. How do they work, how do you correct, etc.? Similar to a prong? Would it not cause as much hair loss as a prong? And do you have a favorite one you recommend? Should I look for one with some chain or just fabric?
Thanks!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,826 Posts
Martingales were originally made for sight hounds who's heads are so slim that they could back out of collars. You adjust the main band of the collar so that when the rings touch, the collar fits snug under the chin. It works similar to the old "choke chain". When the dog is walking loose leash, the collar is slack. When the dog pulls it snugs up but only to the point where the two rings meet. I use mine mostly as a back up for the prong. If my dog backs up they won't slip out of the collar.

And my dogs do walk nicely on a martingale but if they do pull, you can get the same problem with the throat as you do from a flat collar. I like to get mine from LupinePet. Nice designs and a great guarantee.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,877 Posts
The construction is the same as a prong, but without the prongs. So if the dog gets wise, he may feel he can pull. And then because he will pull more than on a prong, it could cause more damage than a prong with long-term use. IF, Maybe.

It is not really a correction collar. However, if you get the kind that is leather or cloth in the area where prongs would be on a prong, and chain where chain is on a prong (this is the kind I use), the noise of the chain or the way the chain moves smoothly will give the dog a reminder that is often enough for dogs to slow down or adjust. And of course, you can apply a leash correction. It will not hurt the dog, but will correct him.

They are not that expensive, you could try it. I use flat collars for the dogs' tags, and a martingale for the leash. It is the only collar I use from puppy on up to connect to the lead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,976 Posts
Hi y'all,
Gandalf is about a year and a half now and we've been using a prong collar for a few months now. He walks very nice on the leash, doesn't pull anymore, can't even remember the last time he lunged at something. The prong has caused some significant hair loss around his neck and I don't really feel it's needed anymore since he's not a puller, however he's still young so I do still want some control better than a flat collar and I know flat collars can cause damage if the dog does decide to pull. I've never used a martingale, but they look like they might be a good option. How do they work, how do you correct, etc.? Similar to a prong? Would it not cause as much hair loss as a prong? And do you have a favorite one you recommend? Should I look for one with some chain or just fabric?
Thanks!
They are the collar I use most commonly, especially with Shadow as she is brutally quick at slipping collars. They need to be properly fitted of course, and I don't find the all nylon ones function properly. I prefer the chain section. Most pet stores now carry them but be cautious as many are cheaply made and will slip loose. It should be fitted the same as a prong, high and snug on the dogs neck, and used in pretty much the same manner.
The benefit to a properly fitted martingale is that the dog is relatively safe to run and play in it, be warned they still rub hair off if left on a lot. The down side is they are not as defined a correction as a choke or a prong. It was useless for Shadow with her frantic, panicky and relentless yanking and pulling but preferable to watching her throttle herself fighting a choke. Other then with her it is generally my collar of choice right from puppy hood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
They are the collar I use most commonly, especially with Shadow as she is brutally quick at slipping collars. They need to be properly fitted of course, and I don't find the all nylon ones function properly. I prefer the chain section. Most pet stores now carry them but be cautious as many are cheaply made and will slip loose. It should be fitted the same as a prong, high and snug on the dogs neck, and used in pretty much the same manner.
The benefit to a properly fitted martingale is that the dog is relatively safe to run and play in it, be warned they still rub hair off if left on a lot. The down side is they are not as defined a correction as a choke or a prong. It was useless for Shadow with her frantic, panicky and relentless yanking and pulling but preferable to watching her throttle herself fighting a choke. Other then with her it is generally my collar of choice right from puppy hood.
Thanks y'all sounds like it might be a good fit for us then! That's what I was hoping for too, something a little safer than a prong to run in. On hikes I keep the prong on even though I probably shouldn't just in case if I have to recall and leash him up and need extra control. G has never tried to slip out of a collar, I've never seen him afraid of anything he's pretty brave! Good to be safe though just in case. Seems like it's easier to put on than a prong too some have clips, although by now I'm used to putting on prongs...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
I've used regular collar, choke collar and martingale on my pup. Both choke and martingale work fine, but chain choke works better. Whichever one, Give it a go!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,826 Posts
You can see that I like that this collar is secure but still relaxed. With my gal I put her prong on but don't clip it to the leash. If she gets over excited and pulling, then I clip the leash to the prong as well.

That works for my gal-dog. I wouldn't do this with my big-boy who is normally calm but may want to chase something in an instant.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,679 Posts
I love martingales! I had Italian Greyhounds for years, and the collar of choice is the martingale. They have narrow heads and they can back out of a collar easily. I’ve always used martingales on GSD puppies, and also have them in adult sizes. I put one on Russ last week because my nephew wanted to take him walking. Russ is good on a leash, but I didn’t want his collar slipping off accidentally, especially since I didn’t go along with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
855 Posts
I've used Martingales too, and I really like them. It was the training collar I used on Ryka when she was just a pup, until I felt she was big enough for me to start using a prong for training. They do a nice "pop", which is reminiscent of the prong, so if the dog has learned that a slight pop means, "hey, cut it out!", it works out lovely. You just have to be a bit careful about sizing, because sometimes it's really easy to slip on but a total pain to get off, haha.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,252 Posts
This is the quick release type that I not only use for my personal dogs, but also the exclusive collar of choice at the training facility I work for - which speaks volumes as far as quality. At any given time we have 200+ dogs in training and close to 2000 working in the field. If your dog is “collar smart” then you may experience some regression initially... they will not “babysit” in the way that some prong collars are used but they can provide a decent mid level correction. So if your dog has been properly trained in either loose leash walking or heeling, then it’s a great option. I like them a lot. My boys both fit the medium (with room).

ETA: forgot link - http://www.cetaceacorp.com/medium-chain-martingale-dog-collar-5646.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
The main benefit of the martingale collar is that your dog won't feel choked whenever you are trying to correct them. This is the reason why martingale collars are considered the safest ones for training sessions. I recommend Country brook petz martingale heavy duty nylon collar, this collar is perfectly adjustable for pups with sizes between 18 inch and 26 inch neck, you can use this collar for training your pup as well since it is comfortable and very efficient. This collar is also made of stainless steel and aluminum and has 20 different collors.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top