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Hello all, we have rescued a german shepherd mix from the human society about a month ago. At the time he was about 10-12 weeks old. When we were doing the paperwork the humane society agent was telling us that the puppy would be neutered before we could bring him home. I couldn't believe they would neuter so young but the guy said that it was completely safe and wouldn't effect the dog in anyway and that it is state law.

Luckily for us and our puppy, there was no available appointments for a couple days so they gave us a sterilization agreement and made us sign it saying we would get him sterilized within 90 days. We had to put down a deposit and received a coupon that was good for a free neutering but it was only good within 30 days.

After doing a little reading, we decided that 3.5-4 months is still to young to neuter, so we will be paying out of pocket for the neutering. And sure enough after reading the state law, the HS can take our dog back and we could be charged with a class 2 misdemeanor if we break the 90 day contract.

We have spoken with our current Vet, but she seems to be on the bandwagon with the over-population crowd and she told us all the benefits of neutering. She told us how it's easier on the dog to get it over when they are younger.

I can't help but think that most of the information stating that early neutering is safe is just propaganda to support their agenda to minimize the pet-overpopulation problems. It seems that the European animimal health athorities do not promote neutering at all, but if it must be done do it later, 1.5-2 years of age.

I know our puppy is just a mutt and he will probibly be perfectly fine after being neutered around 5-6 months, but I think he diserves a chance to be as health as he can be. I would be breaking the law and could lose him if I don't get him neutered befor he is 6 months old. Has anyone with rescues ran into this befor? And if so is there anyway to minimize the possible behavioral or physical effects of an early neutering? Supplements?

Sorry for the vent, I just feel bad that irresponsible owners have caused such a problem that they have to make laws like this without much research being conducted. I understand the reasoning, but there seems to be a better way to go about it than neutering 6-8 week puppies.
 

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Would your humane society accept a vasectomy in lieu of neutering your puppy?
 

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Would your humane society accept a vasectomy in lieu of neutering your puppy?
I agree ask them. Animal is still sterilem although they claim testosterone leads to dogs more likely to wander and run away from home and become aggressive so potentially still a problem dog in the future, in their eyes.

First find a vet willing to do a vasectomy, THEN contact the shelter and tell them

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Couldn't agree more about checking into vasectomy. I was very lucky in that the rescue I got Jinks from is ok with vasectomy as a way to meet the sterilization contract I had to sign. Finding a vet willing to do it, on the other hand, has not been easy.
 

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You put your signature to the agreement. I think a vasectomy should fullfill the agreement. But either way, you agreed to do it, you should do it. I would schedule it for the latest you can within the 90 days, and go ahead.

Your vet is right that recovering from the surgery is generally easier on the dog to have it done younger.
 

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The shelter I adopted Jax from usually sends dogs out for spay/neuter prior to adoption. I was allowed to take her, at 12 weeks, without the spay because I made the appt for my vet as I stood there signing papers. My vet sent a letter to the shelter stating 12 weeks was to early to spay and sent in the appt date scheduled for the spay. It's possible that the shelter may hold off as long as the vet sends in a letter stating the reason for delay and a set date for neuter.

The shelters have this agreement for a reason...because people are irresponsible and the workers at the shelter are the ones that have to hold these animals as they are euthanized because of that irresponsibility. And it is enforceable. My local shelter has taken many people to court over this.
 

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If you signed an agreement that you will neuter within a certain amount of time, I would honour that agreement. I certainly would never sign a contract that I did not intend to honour.

But I think the other suggestions are very good: see if you can get a vasectomy done instead (check with the shelter is they would accept that as proof of neutering), or have your vet do up a letter saying that she/he can't neuter yet due to health reasons, and has to be put off.

If none of these alternate options are acceptable, then I would go ahead and abide by the terms of the contract, since by adopting the pup and signing the papers you have openly and publicly and legally agreed to those terms.

My own beliefs and choices are to not neuter until as late as possible. My four year old male that I got as a puppy is still intact, but my rescue shelter mutt got spayed before her first heat in an arrangement similar to the one from the Humane Society that you are adopting through. But I would not have any issues with neutering a rescue at a young age if that was the requirement of the shelter or rescue organization from which I adopted
 

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If it helps any, I adopted our gsd mix at 3 months and he had already been neutered at 10 weeks. Obviously I have know way of knowing what his life would have been like if he had not been neutered as a baby, but he is now 6 yrs old and I have not noticed any issues. He may be taller than he should have been, but he has been very healthy with the only exception being an allergy to corn. His vet even said he could not believe he was 6 and would have guessed 3 (other than his slowly whitening muzzle). I used to work for a low cost spay neuter clinic and when I left they were just starting to do pediatric spaying and neutering, most animals we saw were 6 months and older. I certainly understand your concern. On one hand you have people telling you that earlier is better and healthier and on the other you have people telling you it is the worst thing you can do for your pet. I am sure the correct answer lies somewhere in the middle. Our newest rescue is now 13-14 weeks old and she was spayed at 8 weeks on the dot! I am very concerned about how this will effect her, but there is nothing I can do about it now. I never thought to see if there were supplements or foods she could eat to help, I will look into that. Good luck with your pup!
 
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