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Lol that's a good one
 

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From what I know, which aint much, the Mal and Dutch shepherd are very similar except for their coats, and I've read the dutch shepherd can be a bit shorter than a mal. Some people say the Dutch shepherd is a bit less manic than a Mal. GSDs, all I would say is that with the # of GSDs out there, some are more active than others, but the Mal and dutch shepherd are considered to be on average more active than GSDs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
From what I know, which aint much, the Mal and Dutch shepherd are very similar except for their coats, and I've read the dutch shepherd can be a bit shorter than a mal. Some people say the Dutch shepherd is a bit less manic than a Mal. GSDs, all I would say is that with the # of GSDs out there, some are more active than others, but the Mal and dutch shepherd are considered to be on average more active than GSDs.
ty for the answer
 

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This is the advice I was given and the one I followed: if you are interested in protection sport (I think I read somewhere you are) and this will be your first working dog, make it easy on yourself and get a GSD male.
 

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I really depends on the lines and the dog.

FCI Dutch Shepherds are not the same as working Dutch Shepherds (often mixed with Malinois and GSD).

Show line Malinois are also very different than working line Malinois.

FCI Dutch Shepherds are different from Showline Malinois in personality and structure.

Working line Malinois are very much like Working line Dutch Shepherds (because of the tendency to breed for super high drive and somewhat because of breed mixing, IMO).

But generally, Belgians are smaller and very people oriented and eager to please. Will absolutely do what you ask without thinking about it.

Dutch Shepherds are similar to Belgians but not as clingy. Nice brindle coloring, and they have those slanty almond shaped eyes that make you think they are up to something. LOL!
 

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This is the advice I was given and the one I followed: if you are interested in protection sport (I think I read somewhere you are) and this will be your first working dog, make it easy on yourself and get a GSD male.
Working line Malinois and DS need to go to an experienced home. ;)
 

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This is the advice I was given and the one I followed: if you are interested in protection sport (I think I read somewhere you are) and this will be your first working dog, make it easy on yourself and get a GSD male.

I agree with this. And will add a Working line male. Not that I haven't seen some good show line males...I actually have. But why not stack the deck in your favor?

My first GSD was a working line male and he was nice and easy for a beginner which gave me some early success and kept me motivated to learn...and now look at the crew. :crazy:
 

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Working line Malinois and DS need to go to an experienced home. ;)
I would also agree with this. They can be great dogs (Although generally not my type of dog personally)...but I think the learning curve is amplified for the novice working dog owner.

What's the saying...Learn to drive before you get a racecar?
 

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I really depends on the lines and the dog.

FCI Dutch Shepherds are not the same as working Dutch Shepherds (often mixed with Malinois and GSD).

Show line Malinois are also very different than working line Malinois.

FCI Dutch Shepherds are different from Showline Malinois in personality and structure.

Working line Malinois are very much like Working line Dutch Shepherds (because of the tendency to breed for super high drive and somewhat because of breed mixing, IMO).

But generally, Belgians are smaller and very people oriented and eager to please. Will absolutely do what you ask without thinking about it.

Dutch Shepherds are similar to Belgians but not as clingy. Nice brindle coloring, and they have those slanty almond shaped eyes that make you think they are up to something. LOL!
I think this is a nice generalization.

I might add that in my experience, DSs have a bit less prey drive than Malinois, a little more aggression or defense depending on the dog. Again though, it depends also on lines.

And nope, no sloping backs! :D
 

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The Belgian breeds all tend towards being a bit sharper than GSDs. GSDs are a bit more level headed. Belgians are very ummm...spirited dogs. The Belgians tend to be "flashier" workers (regardless of what "work" you're dong) because they are light on their feet, quick moving and quick to react. GSDs tend to be more powerful though for sure. Both breeds tend to have similarities too - clever, easy to train, good problem solvers, devoted and always up for whatever you want to do. I do have to say there is something about how devoted a good GSD is to their people that is truly unique to them.

It is not at all uncommon for working line Mals to be mixed with GSD or Dutch Shepherd (some even have bully breeds in their background). In those dogs, the differences can become quite blurred between the breeds or if they have a non-shepherd breed mixed in be a very different kind of dog.
 

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this question is sorta like what is the difference between labs, goldens, chesapeaks. They are all different breeds bred for similar things in different regions with different terrain, and requirements. Your question all are bred to herd, mine all are water retrievers. Mals are one of 4 varieties of Belgian Shepherd dogs. All are supposed to be the same dog with only coat as a difference. Some mals are now being bred with no regard to the standard and as the previous post mentioned often are bred with other breeds to get a different dog.

Just as knowledgeable GS people don't want the breed to be ruined by fashion or current trend I abhor what is happening to this variety. Not that long ago all varieties were quite similar and for those in the know each variety can and often does throw another in a litter, the only exception is the laeken, or wire coat. So when people are trying to breed a sharper dog or heavier/larger dog they are not doing the breed any good.

All varieties can excell at any of the jobs they were bred for, with certain lines better than others and some individuals excelling. However the reality, as with GS is they were originally bred to herd, police/army dog was second for Gs. With GS being such a new breed, they could be argued that is their purpose, hence the schutzhund is more popular than sheep tending. But older herding breeds can and do well as police/army dogs. In France most police dogs, search and rescue dogs are Belgian Groenendals, black long coats, so when someone only assumes Mals can do schutzhund they should look to Europe where lots of the varieties have titles and are frequently exported as CH...Titled..(obedience,agility, tending, Ring).

Just a thought Belgian people aren't too happy with people mixing breeds creating mutts to change the way teh breed should be
 

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It is not at all uncommon for working line Mals to be mixed with GSD or Dutch Shepherd (some even have bully breeds in their background).
This in not quite the story. Some DUTCH line Malinois are mixed. Most Malinois people call them Malinois-X. But the other working line Malinois are not mixed.
 

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This in not quite the story. Some DUTCH line Malinois are mixed. Most Malinois people call them Malinois-X. But the other working line Malinois are not mixed.
I have seen dogs which were supposedly purebred Mals from working lines but obviously were not. I'm not talking about differences in breed type either, there certainly are a range of looks in purebred Mals. I'm talking dogs were it was really obvious that there was another breed mixed in, such as a Bully breed.
 
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