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I remember a couple of members posting about their puppy not wanting to leave their property and pulling all the way back home. Ours did too, and I would drive to a park close by just to get it to walk.

So I wanted to share what's working for me. I started loose leash walking with clicker training and I walked him on our driveway. We did figure 8's, zig zags, practising loose leash, then stepping off on to the road and back on to the driveway while doing it. And I kept increasing the number of steps away from the house, and just kept up the frequency of clicks and treats. I just pretend the road is part of the driveway. Increase the distance gradually over several days.

Today I was able to go around 2 blocks with the puppy pretty well behaved on the leash. If he pulls as we get closer to home, I just stop and he comes back and sits next to me. Then I take very small slow steps, and click treat again.

Hope this helps someone!
 

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I tried pretty much the same thing...didn't work for me. The only thing that has worked is having my best friend walk through her back yard..cut through mine with her Labradoodle and then me and roxy meet them in the yard and roxy will follow sophie to go out and walk.

that's cool that it worked for you. I wish I could still go out with her by myself sometimes but it just hasn't happened yet.
 

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I tried pretty much the same thing...didn't work for me. The only thing that has worked is having my best friend walk through her back yard..cut through mine with her Labradoodle and then me and roxy meet them in the yard and roxy will follow sophie to go out and walk.

that's cool that it worked for you. I wish I could still go out with her by myself sometimes but it just hasn't happened yet.
May be with time :)

Frodo is almost 4 months old now, and this week I saw a huge change in him overnight. Followed by relentlessly trying to dominate the kids for 2 days too :/. He seems to have given up on that today.

You are lucky with the walking buddy though :). Wish I could fine one for him. He gets way too excited when he sees dogs.
 

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this has worked out great for both of them. sophie really wasn't walked much..I think she's like 4 years old now ..somewhere around there..and she's been kind of a nippy dog. She's getting much better when we walk with her about not nipping and growling at everybody that walks by.

We were both really surprised that sophie took to roxy like she did. The first meeting we did with me outside the fence and sophie in the fence..wasn't so good and we were afraid they would never be friends...but we went on some neutral turf and just walked ..like there wasn't any say in it..and they both just went with it and now you can tell they are best friends.
 

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this has worked out great for both of them. sophie really wasn't walked much..I think she's like 4 years old now ..somewhere around there..and she's been kind of a nippy dog. She's getting much better when we walk with her about not nipping and growling at everybody that walks by.

We were both really surprised that sophie took to roxy like she did. The first meeting we did with me outside the fence and sophie in the fence..wasn't so good and we were afraid they would never be friends...but we went on some neutral turf and just walked ..like there wasn't any say in it..and they both just went with it and now you can tell they are best friends.

Nice! Yeah, I heard the best way to introduce two dogs is to take them for a walk together. And I also have found being in opposite sides of the fence just seems to make them tense.
 

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When Ozzy was little, he didn't want to leave the front yard. Nope! And he KNEW when we were on our way back home. He was like, "OH YEAH. HEADED HOME! FULL STEAM AHEAD!"

To get him to leave the yard, I lead him out with treats. He'd take a few steps - treat. Eventually, I would increase the number of steps he had to take before he got the treat. Before he knew it, it was SO MUCH FUN to leave the house!

Then for loose-leash walking, it was like leash training any other dog. He would pull - we turned around.
With that method, they learn that if they're patient, they get to go where they want. If they yank and pull and rip your arm out of the socket (well, that last one was obviously not the case with Ozzy, but you get my drift), then it's going to take them 100x longer to get where they want to go.
 

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i think you may want to teach your dog that he can only
enter the road with a command.

I remember a couple of members posting about their puppy not wanting to leave their property and pulling all the way back home. Ours did too, and I would drive to a park close by just to get it to walk.

So I wanted to share what's working for me. I started loose leash walking with clicker training and I walked him on our driveway. We did figure 8's, zig zags, practising loose leash, then stepping off on to the road and back on to the driveway while doing it. And I kept increasing the number of steps away from the house, and just kept up the frequency of clicks and treats. I just pretend the road is part of the driveway. Increase the distance gradually over several days.

Today I was able to go around 2 blocks with the puppy pretty well behaved on the leash. If he pulls as we get closer to home, I just stop and he comes back and sits next to me. Then I take very small slow steps, and click treat again.

Hope this helps someone!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
When Ozzy was little, he didn't want to leave the front yard. Nope! And he KNEW when we were on our way back home. He was like, "OH YEAH. HEADED HOME! FULL STEAM AHEAD!"

To get him to leave the yard, I lead him out with treats. He'd take a few steps - treat. Eventually, I would increase the number of steps he had to take before he got the treat. Before he knew it, it was SO MUCH FUN to leave the house!

Then for loose-leash walking, it was like leash training any other dog. He would pull - we turned around.
With that method, they learn that if they're patient, they get to go where they want. If they yank and pull and rip your arm out of the socket (well, that last one was obviously not the case with Ozzy, but you get my drift), then it's going to take them 100x longer to get where they want to go.

With our puppy, the difficulty was that once we headed back towards home(he seemed to always have a sense of which way home was) , he would pull and run all the way. He sounded like a steam engine. Hence I had to stop and let him pull with no effect, and then try tiny steps very slow once he sat down, and click treat for almost every two steps he managed to walk with me. I tried going opposite direction but once I turned around he would start pulling again. He got the drift eventually though.
 

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I tried that stopping and turning around and trying to make Roxy wait..as soon as we would step off to go again it would be another correction. I was afraid she was going to kill herself by pulling so hard..not worth it to me to "make" her walk where it was obviously causing stress. So we have great luck with going in the van to a trail. OR my best friend will bring her dog over and then Roxy will head out of the yard to walk with her. She still glances back at the house every once in awhile until we are out of site of it.
 

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With our puppy, the difficulty was that once we headed back towards home(he seemed to always have a sense of which way home was) , he would pull and run all the way. He sounded like a steam engine. Hence I had to stop and let him pull with no effect, and then try tiny steps very slow once he sat down, and click treat for almost every two steps he managed to walk with me. I tried going opposite direction but once I turned around he would start pulling again. He got the drift eventually though.
When I was leash training my mom's French bulldog and pit bull, they would bolt the second I turned around, every time I turned around.
For the first several sessions, for half an hour, we literally did not leave the front of our house. Not because they didn't want to leave, but because we were pretty much walking back and forth for the entire time.
Probably looked pretty stupid to anyone watching, but it works.

With Ozzy, sometimes our walks that I planned on being 20ish minutes would end up being much, much longer. Eventually, he'd wear himself out from going back and forth so much that he'd quit pulling. Either that, or he just got the idea and would be more patient. (Until the next day).
 
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