German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So we decided to get another puppy from the same breeder that we got Cedar from. We really think she could use the company of another dog as she gets bored easy, despite all the time we devote to exercising her, both mentally and physically.

Anyway, the breeder just asked us if we would want Cedar's sister, which they kept as a show dog. They told me the dog has a great temperament, but generally hasn't been a house dog or a family companion. It's mostly been in their kennels with the other dogs.

Now, it is only 4.5 months, so I'm thinking that it getting used to living inside with us shouldn't be too hard to adapt to, right? I guess I'm just wondering if it would be difficult for the pup to adapt to us, or if she's still young enough that it should be an easy transition?

We planned on getting another 8 week old puppy, but we think it would be kind of nice to have one of the Cedar's littermate.

Anyone think the transition will be difficult for a 4.5 month old pup that's not used to being a family companion?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,206 Posts
Two females can be a challenge when they mature(they may start fighting and you'll have to keep them separated)...and having two seniors together can be hard emotionally and for your wallet when they start aging. I'm surprised the breeder would want you to have two at the same age, many breeders discourage having two pups together unless you are competing/working them.
As for transitioning from a kennel to home that may be the least of the problems. Personally, I'd pass on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I had two huskies before, both were female, although they were a few years apart.

I'm not worried about the financial aspect. Yeah, the emotional one will be rough once they start aging, but that's simply something we dog lovers learn to deal with, because we know it's coming every 10 years or so.

I'm more so worried about how well a 4.5 month old puppy will adapt to suddenly being a family pet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,602 Posts
I think she's young enough to adjust well. A class for socialization, manners and obedience would help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
751 Posts
Two females can be a challenge when they mature(they may start fighting and you'll have to keep them separated)...and having two seniors together can be hard emotionally and for your wallet when they start aging. I'm surprised the breeder would want you to have two at the same age, many breeders discourage having two pups together unless you are competing/working them.
As for transitioning from a kennel to home that may be the least of the problems. Personally, I'd pass on it.
My thoughts about why the breeder didn't mention anything was she want's to sell the 4-5 month old because she hasn't lived up to her billing.

Having a new puppy that is not house trained could cause your puppy to take a few steps backwards along with all the other issues from outside to inside. I also worry if the new puppy was not socialized the first 4-5 months of it's puppy hood thats not going to be a good thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
My thoughts about why the breeder didn't mention anything was she want's to sell the 4-5 month old because she hasn't lived up to her billing.

Having a new puppy that is not house trained could cause your puppy to take a few steps backwards along with all the other issues from outside to inside. I also worry if the new puppy was not socialized the first 4-5 months of it's puppy hood thats not going to be a good thing.
I know they took her to a show for puppies (up to 2 years) and she won 1st place out of 25 dogs. With that said, I'm not looking to show her whatsoever.

Yeah, the other stuff you said has me concerned as well, but isn't that stuff always a concern when getting an older puppy/dog? No dog is untrainable, and with enough work any dog can be socialized properly, especially a 4.5 month old puppy.

I'm getting another puppy either way. I'm just not sure if I'm going to get Cedar's littermate, or get another 8 week old puppy.

I'm grasping at straws trying to make up my mind because I'm completely torn between the two ideas.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
751 Posts
I would go visit the seester with your puppy and see how everything goes and either at that time or at a later date say you will give her a try for a few days and see if it's going to work. You already know what you went through with your puppy so you decide after a few days is it going to work or would you rather have an 8 week old puppy.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
27,461 Posts
I'm thinking I can't talk you out of this........but really wish you'd just keep your one wonderful puppy.

To get another puppy mostly for the existing one, isn't really doing your current puppy the favor you think. Though playing together will be fun, it does mean you won't spend the time with the new puppy you did with your single puppy............... and the time you were able to spend with your single puppy will now be halved (or less) due to the new puppy that will need alot of your time and attention.

I know I much prefer to spend my time and money on socializing/exercising/training ONE puppy for a few years. Making them practically perfect and really having the time to make them that way. Then adding another puppy knowing EXACTLY what I have, and what I'll like to add. Feeling hardly any guilt at the times I'll be ignoring the 'old' puppy while having to spend the extra one on one with the new.

PLEASE also consider 12 years from now. With 2 senior dogs, with all the senior issues, pains (carrying an TWO 80 pound dogs around?), vet expenses, and making final decisions for them......... those decisions are hard enough to make for one dog rather than 2....

Other issues on this puppy end is you get what you say you want... puppies loving each other and playing with each other and the humans become a much more periferal part of their lives (yeah yeah, they are good to bring the food and take us out, but humans are just ok ...) cause they have each other...

Some good sites on why it's MUCH better to have a split in their ages for you AND for the dogs are:

Raising Siblings

http://www.doglistener.co.uk/choosing/siblings.shtml

Raising 2 pups at one time in a Family Setting

Pros and Cons of Raising Two Litter Mate Puppies
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
751 Posts
I'm thinking I can't talk you out of this........but really wish you'd just keep your one wonderful puppy.

To get another puppy mostly for the existing one, isn't really doing your current puppy the favor you think. Though playing together will be fun, it does mean you won't spend the time with the new puppy you did with your single puppy............... and the time you were able to spend with your single puppy will now be halved (or less) due to the new puppy that will need alot of your time and attention.

I know I much prefer to spend my time and money on socializing/exercising/training ONE puppy for a few years. Making them practically perfect and really having the time to make them that way. Then adding another puppy knowing EXACTLY what I have, and what I'll like to add. Feeling hardly any guilt at the times I'll be ignoring the 'old' puppy while having to spend the extra one on one with the new.

PLEASE also consider 12 years from now. With 2 senior dogs, with all the senior issues, pains (carrying an TWO 80 pound dogs around?), vet expenses, and making final decisions for them......... those decisions are hard enough to make for one dog rather than 2....

Other issues on this puppy end is you get what you say you want... puppies loving each other and playing with each other and the humans become a much more periferal part of their lives (yeah yeah, they are good to bring the food and take us out, but humans are just ok ...) cause they have each other...

Some good sites on why it's MUCH better to have a split in their ages for you AND for the dogs are:

Raising Siblings

http://www.doglistener.co.uk/choosing/siblings.shtml

Raising 2 pups at one time in a Family Setting

Pros and Cons of Raising Two Litter Mate Puppies
That does make the most sense. Enjoying your puppy now and giving her the one on one time to teach her and bond with her is priceless and guess what 3 years later you get to enjoy raising a puppy again AND you dog that you trained so incredibly well will do most of the work for you.

That would be the way I would go, hey I did go that way I now have a 9 & a 6 year old GSD. GOOD LUCK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,828 Posts
I would also wait. Having two puppies at the same time is just a bad idea all the way around. Spending all your spare time and money on the one puppy will make such a difference in the quality of that puppy as a companion dog for the long term. Once this puppy is grown and fully trained, then if you still want another one, go for it.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top