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I have a question about GSD's. I love the way the German Bloodline looks, but do not want the drive associated with it. Do the German bloodlines produce a GSD that can be a great family dog without the string drive? I live in Texas and am looking at spending around $ 1,500.00. Any advice?
 

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you've come to the right place! sadly i have no advice for you regarding a breeder. i will wish you luck in your search though!
 

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Are you sure you're looking for a Shepherd? It's an honest question. Drive is a big part of what a GSD is. Drive also does not = super spastic can't sit still or deal with a day or two without a walk (that would be hyper).

A proper GSD, if it has the proper temperament, can be and is a marvelous family pet, but they are a breed for active people.
 

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I have a question about GSD's. I love the way the German Bloodline looks, but do not want the drive associated with it. Do the German bloodlines produce a GSD that can be a great family dog without the string drive? I live in Texas and am looking at spending around $ 1,500.00. Any advice?
Sorry, being from NYS, I can't suggest a breeder in your area. But I would like to know who led you to believe that the German Blood lines would not make good family dogs:confused:. All of our girls are "German". All service dogs and all great family dogs. If you have any german blood line breeders in your area, I'm sure they will invite you to meet some of their dogs. Good Luck in your search.:):)
 

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What part of Tx are in you (it's a big state :). I sent you a PM on a breeder near Sherman. Who ever you use, make sure you tell the breeder you don't want a lot of drive. They can match you up with a lower drive dog.
 

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Hopefully the breeder doesn't breed for lower drive...
 

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onyx'girl - no not at all. she sends her dogs to germany for titles. I told the OP to let whomever know that he doesn't want a lot of drive. There are different drive litters within every litter and he may not be aware of that.
 

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I can't say enough good things about Van Meerhout in Hutto (north of Austin). In fact we're getting a puppy from there.
 

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** removed by Admin. Advertising of litters is not allowed on this board**
 

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some German lines have drive some don't
have as much drive. with training and socializing
you can control the drive. i have a West German show dog.
he's from a long line of Schutzhund trained dogs.
my dog is our pet/companion. he's quiet in the house and active when outdoors.

I have a question about GSD's. I love the way the German Bloodline looks, but do not want the drive associated with it. Do the German bloodlines produce a GSD that can be a great family dog without the string drive? I live in Texas and am looking at spending around $ 1,500.00. Any advice?
 

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West German Showline dogs do not tend to be as high in drives as German Working lines, but it is not as simple as that. You can get puppies from high drive working line parents that do not have the super high drives. I think you are more likely to find what you are looking for in German showlines though.

In any line's litter there may be dogs with higher drives, there may be some with more confidence, some that are more submissive, some that are more biddible, some that are higher energy.

The best thing is for you to spend some time with the litter if at all possible. If you are close enough visit two or three times. And plan to spend the time watching them. Crackle a plastic bottle and drop it in there, watch the puppies, who gets the bottle time and time again. Might just want to steer clear of that puppy -- maybe a little bit much.

The absolute worst dog I ever had walked up and chose me.
The absolute best dog I ever had walked up and chose me.

That doesn't help, but my advice is not to choose the first pup that walks up to you because it walked up to you, but watch them and see if that pup has the other traits you are looking for.

The Monks of New Skete have a book, The Art of Raising a Puppy, and many of the learned folks on this forum might scoff, but they have a test in the back of the book, a puppy temperament test that when given at seven weeks, can tell you quite a bit about your pup.

In fact it is best if a stranger performs the test, and it is easy to do. I had Jenna's first litter tested by a person who purchased the first female pup in the litter. I would say that it was right on for all of the puppies. Most of them were middle of the road puppies, with some twos and some fours but mostly threes.

That does not tell you much.

The pup she took tested independant and something else. And as I am in contact with her, she says she is exactly that. The other pup that had a stronger personality went to a guy I am also in contact with and from the things he tells me, I have to agree with the assessment. Most of the pups I have kept track of and would say they are pretty much how they tested. The pup I kept certainly is.

All ten puppies were tested in probably less than 1 hour. The tests are quick and easy, though I could not watch. For example, when the puppy is in an unfamiliar place the stranger calls the puppy, and what the puppy does, you read down a list of responses and put the number down. Puppy growls and barks at you that might be a 1, puppy looks at you but keeps doing whatever he is doing that might be a 2. Puppy runs and hides under a chair that would be a 5. No response -- that might be a 6.

Elevate the dog, and mark its response. Struggles, nips at hand, Struggles briefly, then quits, struggles, wags tail, licks at hands, etc.

What you will want is a middle of the road puppy. One with mostly 1s might make a great police dog or service dogs, but is generally too much for a pet owner. One with mostly fives will be shy, probably having poor nerves and may be a challenge to train and socialize.

Would I select a police dog with this test? No. But what is good about it is that you are measuring one pup against the other puppies in the litter, you could find the best pup for you from that litter by measuring the reactions with respect to the other dogs' reactions.
 

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I saw your post and wanted to pass along the breeder we went with while in Texas. The breeder kennel is called Haus Merkel and I would highly suggest looking at. They are located right outside Dallas. She has amazing German Bloodline German Shepherds with wonderful temperments. She is also a great breeder in that she was willing to work us to find the perfect puppy for your particular family and is always there for questions and advice long after you take your new family member home. Below is her website. Take sometime looking over her site, you should have all your questions answered. Hope this helps.

German Shepherd Breeder | German Shepherd Puppies for sale | German Shepherd Puppies
 

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The Monks of New Skete have a book, The Art of Raising a Puppy, and many of the learned folks on this forum might scoff, but they have a test in the back of the book, a puppy temperament test that when given at seven weeks, can tell you quite a bit about your pup.
Are you talking about the PAT test, or is the one in the Monks of New Skeke book different?
 

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Could be the same I guess.

The first 8-12 test, test temperament, the next 4-5 test obedience aptitude.

One of the test is to pinch down on the toe until the pup makes a noise, tells you how touch sensitive, another you slam a door or drop a stainless steel bowl, and see if they are noise sensitive by what their response is.
 

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The first 8-12 test, test temperament, the next 4-5 test obedience aptitude.
One of the test is to pinch down on the toe until the pup makes a noise, tells you how touch sensitive, another you slam a door or drop a stainless steel bowl, and see if they are noise sensitive by what their response is.
Here's a link to Volhard's PAT test if anyone is interested.
The Puppy Aptitude Test (PAT) - at the Land of PureGold
 

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Yes, that is the test. I do not remember the umbrella but other than that, I think it is about the same.
 

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Selzer, thank you for sharing the wisdom you learned from experience, and especially the following:

The absolute worst dog I ever had walked up and chose me.
The absolute best dog I ever had walked up and chose me.

I did get the best dog I've known who (after 15 minutes of sizing me up, chose me). Now, I know that that is not an infallible recipe for finding an excellent dog and that I need to look his/her other qualities, as well. This will save me and others here from possibly making a huge mistake. Us newbies don't know what we don't know!

Cecilia
 
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