German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,034 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok, being new to long coats I have some basic grooming questions.

What do you use for shampoo and conditioner? Same as you would for a stock coat or do you use something to make the hair softer or silkier?

How often do you brush them as young pups (before their adult coat comes in) and then as adults (with their final coat)?

I'm guessing a long toothed comb is a must have for these guys. Anything else? I have the dog dryer already.


Any places that frequently mat that I should watch out for?

Does anyone clean the underside of their longcoat - remove the hair inside the back legs and such?

Any other grooming tips would be greatly appreciated!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,138 Posts
I am not a big bather of dogs. They get a good shampoo twice a year, but they get rinsed or hosed down more often. I just use a nice mild (natural) shampoo, no cream rinse.

My three coats have different types of coat so it depends on the coat, DeeDee will get tangles on her hindquarters if I don't brush often enough, Lakota will get tangles behind his ears from itching and his belly and hind quaters if I don't brush often enough, Cheyenne's tail is usually the place I have to spend the most time on.

The only thing I will trim and it depends on the year is the hair between the toes.

So keeping up on the brushing is important, sometimes it is just a quick grush through other times (blowing Coat) it takes more time.

I like to get my youngs pups use to being brushed, so I do even a min or two every day.

The one thing you will notice with most cost (or what I have seen) is they are about 4 or so before you really get the final results of the coat and even there there can be more changes. Cheyennes coat length is still changing.

Val
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,719 Posts
Hi Lauri!

I love grooming those long coats!

Betty (wicked1996) big boys are the best! And Frieda too, of coarse.

Haven't seen them in a long time though.
We really miss her kitty
too.
What do you use for shampoo and conditioner? Same as you would for a stock coat or do you use something to make the hair softer or silkier?
Someone on a Shih Tzu board just recommended some great stuff to me.
It's called Earth Bath
And it has Oatmeal & Alhoe in it. I haven't used it on DaKota yet.
But I do really like the results so far on the Shih Tzu & pug.
They also have an oatmeal condtioner I use too.

How often do you brush them as young pups (before their adult coat comes in) and then as adults (with their final coat)?
I would brush & comb often, just to get them use to being brush &
combed.

I'm guessing a long toothed comb is a must have for these guys. Anything else? I have the dog dryer already.
I really like using a dematting comb on thick heavy coats & double coats. It catches alot of dead undercoat & matts that you don't see.

Any places that frequently mat that I should watch out for?
Ears, elbows & the butt. to me, ththose places tend to matt the quickest.

Does anyone clean the underside of their longcoat - remove the hair inside the back legs and such?
I like cleaning out the undercarrage. It can get so knotted & dirty under there.
I also like doing this with client's dogs that only come in occasionaly.
It thins out the skirting back there & doesn't seem to knot up so quickly.


Any other grooming tips would be greatly appreciated!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,245 Posts
My LC Kacie(she isn't as long as some) is much more work than a stock coat to keep up with. Other than when it is muddy out I have to hose her bottom half down in the bathtub. I don't use anything but water, and my awesome hand held shower thingy. Invest in one of those if you don't have one now. They are easy to install and are priceless! I clipped her foot fuzz about three weeks ago, otherwise she will carry in snowballs, and I'm sure it hurts her to walk on frozen snow...
I use a rake on all dogs, (Clover was a double coated Golden/Border and I could get about three puppies worth of fur everytime I brushed her), have a bristle and pin brush as well. But just a good brushing is all that so far is needed, especially when on a RAW diet. I just gave my dogs some rasberries(bhlllllllehhhhphhhh's) and my mouth did have some fur from Kace, but neither shed like the other GSD's I am around. Not a bit of oder at all, I love to breathe them in!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,245 Posts
too late to edit: I meant to say she isn't much more work...my fingers were typing faster than my laptop could keep up with!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,782 Posts
As was said, it depends on the indivuidual coat. I have treated all of my long coats exactly the same as my "regular" coats as far as bathing. 2 of mine had no matting issues. The famale would get them behind her ears. (They were all long coats (WITH an undercoat.) but they had different coats from each other She also got REALLY long hair on the bottoms of her feet, between her toes and on the backs of her hind legs from the foot to the hock. I either cut it off with the scissors or shaved it so it was the length of a "regular coated" dogs coat.

The only "tools" I used were a clicker bruch and a "regular" comb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,310 Posts
I have a rake that i bought for less than 5 dollars at walmart, and that's all i've needed so far... that and a few really absorbent towels. I brush Riley about 3-4 times a week for as long as she will let me. She hasn't blown her coat yet, but it helped as she was losing the puppy fuzz and growing her grown up coat.

I think the only "special" equipment I would recommend is a really good vacuum! (we just got a carpet deep cleaner on amazon today for super cheap with free shipping... yay!) but i'm sure ANY GSD owner- long coat or not is used to that!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
Have always had long coats so don't know the difference!!

The dryer, which you have, is my life saver. I don't know how I ever managed without it! It is great for just blowing out all the loose hair and with wet, sandy dogs it's a must.

An undercoat rake is also a great investment. I just use the rake and a pin brush.

I try and give them a quick brush everyday, it stops the coat from ever getting matted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
Originally Posted By: Annemarie
I try and give them a quick brush everyday, it stops the coat from ever getting matted.
Exactly. I have no experience with other GSD, but I brush Wolf (LC + undercoat) with a furminator every night-thoroughly but different areas. It's part of the evening routine. There are really not any mats to speak of. He gets a professional grooming every 3-4 months.

It's a pleasure to take care of him.

MJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,992 Posts
My guy doesnt get any special treatment. He gets brushed and thats it. His coat is gorgeous all on his own, doesnt matt. Enjoy his fluffiness!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,495 Posts
I don't have one yet but I've been interested in the long coats for a while. You need to watch around the ears for mats and under the back legs. I would brush/comb very often with a pup to get them totally comfortable with the process.
I'm not sure how well it would work for a GSD but with the other longhaired dogs I've cared for I like to use a flea comb as a regular grooming tool. It gets any dirt out of the coat, great for loose fur and removes even the smallest of tangles before they can form a mat. That and a slicker are the main things I used on my Golden. I've tried undercoat rakes before but the only dog they've worked on that I've tried was a Malamute mix.
If/when I get a long coat GSD I plan to trim the stomach/underside, not short but just to keep it looking neat and keep it cleaner. I did this with my Golden's feathering, you couldn't really tell it was trimmed but it just looked more well-groomed. I would also trim the fur underneath/between the paw pads which I also did with my Golden to keep good traction and prevent snow/dirt or ice balls from forming under the pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,957 Posts
What do you use for shampoo and conditioner? Same as you would for a stock coat or do you use something to make the hair softer or silkier?

I use castille soap or shampoo. I dampen the dog first, soap them up, then we get in the tub for the rinse. I've covered the floor with a yoga mat and towels. I've put no slip mats of some sort in the tub. I've got treats. (I also take off my clothes - this is going to be WET.) I run some water in the tub & call the dogs in. (Their ears are now plugged with cotton balls.) We rinse off. This may involve hopping in and out of the tub a few times with Barker the Younger. (Anything to keep this positive.) We drain the tub, dry the dogs as best I can before they hop out, dry them more in the bathroom, turn them loose, clean the bathroom & take a shower.

How often do you brush them as young pups (before their adult coat comes in) and then as adults (with their final coat)? As young pups, I brush often - daily is best and turn it into a game. It is always supposed to be fun. They can run off part way but overall they need to come back to finish up.


I'm guessing a long toothed comb is a must have for these guys. Anything else? I have the dog dryer already.

I may not understand what you mean by a "long toothed comb". If you can find one of the rubbermaid combs designed for long coated dogs, they are the best comb you can get. Unfortunately they are discontinued.

I have the rubbermaid comb, another metal comb with medium and wide spaced teeth (also very good) and a gazillion other metal combs. I have a rake and a matt splitter (two of them - one looks a bit like a scythe, the other has several teeth and looks wicked. I have slicker brushes.

Any places that frequently mat that I should watch out for?

As the undercoat loosens, it migrates towards the tail and towards the sides and flanks. This is more evident as it is always much easier to comb the back. Flanks, sides, fluffy butts & front leg "pits", neck & behind the ears (sounds like almost the whole dog, eh?) are spots to give particular attention.

Does anyone clean the underside of their longcoat - remove the hair inside the back legs and such?

I don't shave it until they are gimpy and have a problem keeping it out of the stream when they urinate. Then, yes, I do shave a bit. But if they don't have hair, they tend to get sticky and damp. Not good. So I am careful what I shave.

Any other grooming tips would be greatly appreciated

Cornstarch. Work cornstarch through the coat before you begin. This helps loosen the dead undercoat from the still live hair.

First tool is the matt splitter/cutter tools. If you do have mats be gentle even with this. It works, though, to loosen the dead undercoat, to pull it out more easily, even if there are no matts. Just a whish or two through the feathers or any other heavily "furred" part.

Then use the rake. This goes pretty fast too. then the rubbermaid comb or the wide tooth comb (6 teeth per inch ) - then a finer comb to get the last of the dead undercoat.

Now you are ready to top off with the slicker brush or a soft bristle brush.

Do the full monty about once a week. To spot/short grooms in between.

You will still wonder where all the hair that forms clumps around the house comes from.

BTW on the puppy for the first few months I'd only use the soft bristle brush.

On a long haired shep, I don't think the flea comb would work very well. On mine they do OK on the top of the head and on the muzzle but are generally worthless anywhere else. A golden is a mexican hairless as compared to a coated shep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,719 Posts
Here is a picture & discription of the comb that I love to use. I also use it on DaKota & she loves being combed! LOL


Our Master Grooming Tools™ were designed by groomers specifically to increase comfort and reduce the risk of repetitive motion injury. Our Master Grooming Tools Ergonomic Shedding Combs are unlike any other shedding combs you’ve used. The ergonomic design reduces the strain and fatigue that is often associated with traditional shedding combs. Hardened steel teeth are set at a 90-degree angle, so your wrist remains straight and your hand stays in a natural position. Innovative pistol grip handle provides a more secure and comfortable grip for greater control without straining.

I am also going to try to find a link for you on how to trim those feet. That is another place to watch for matting. Both between the top of the toes & between the pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,719 Posts
Hey Lauri? Will this help any? I know it is a Golden Retriever website, but I think it will help to see better.
This is for trimming the feet: Trimming feet
This is what we do on Long haired GSDs at work also.
Please make sure you clean out the pads of the feet completely too. You do not want the toes to be matted together. Some people do not recommend it, but those matts down deep can get really painful & carry debrie that will dig into the skin.
Almost like a sharp pebble digging into your foot with socks on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,083 Posts
<span style="color: #FF0000">Not a shepherd but a quasi-long-cated collie</span>

What do you use for shampoo and conditioner? Same as you would for a stock coat or do you use something to make the hair softer or silkier?

<span style="color: #FF0000">I use an iodine shampoo and an organic conditioner - I use it on myself, it's called Amazonian and it's passion fruit scented, but very lightly scented.</span>


How often do you brush them as young pups (before their adult coat comes in) and then as adults (with their final coat)?

<span style="color: #FF0000">Sandi was brushed a couple times a week, went to the groomers right away, to get her used to it. Followed up with monthly visits</span>

I'm guessing a long toothed comb is a must have for these guys. Anything else? I have the dog dryer already.


<span style="color: #FF0000">Long-toothed comb, rake and slicker. Slicker for quick "freshening-up" especially since her hair kinks if it gets damp.</span>


Any places that frequently mat that I should watch out for?

<span style="color: #FF0000">I find the feathers on the front legs have to be kept neat, we have the "collie ears" issue. I always check the pelvic region as I do find alot of mats there. I find, we do alot of bush walking and sometimes we go off the path, burrs are a nightmare, I almost always have to cut them out because they just dread like crazy</span>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,034 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
That is very similar to the comb I have.

I bought a Furminator. I hate it. I feel it breaks the coat.

I'll have to invest in a couple nice long-tooth grooming combs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,495 Posts
Yes the Furminator does break the coat especially if you use it too much in one spot. I used one for my Golden and it seemed ok on her back where her fur was not as long, but when I tried to use it on her feathering (hips) it definitely was breaking the coat and made her fur look all choppy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
I brush and comb at least every other day, I pay special attention to my girls hind end and her ear tufts. I bathe only a few times a year. I like the natural coat. I do however trim up her paw pads when they get too crazy.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top