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Yes, dogs that bloat once are more likely to do it again regardless of whether they have their stomachs tacked. You might want to make a home 'emergency kit' in case it happens again. Gas-X helps for sure. On another thread, I believe someone mentioned using activated charcoal? Hopefully others will chime in and confirm or not, or you could do a search.

One thing to look out for in the next several vet visits, is that severe cases of gastric torsion can damage the heart from the stress - maybe ask the vet to pay special attention to that in the next checkup. I had a friend whose dog ended up dieing from heart failure related to damage done during a particularly severe bloat + torsion. The failure occurred several years after the bloat, but the heart damage was apparent pretty soon after recovery.
 

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I second the suggestion for the 4health Tractor Supply Co. brand if you have access to it. It's not quite in the same league as, say, TOTW, and it's grain inclusive - but it's relatively healthy, has reasonably good ingredients, and is VERY affordable.
 

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Yes, dogs that bloat once are more likely to do it again regardless of whether they have their stomachs tacked. You might want to make a home 'emergency kit' in case it happens again. Gas-X helps for sure. On another thread, I believe someone mentioned using activated charcoal? Hopefully others will chime in and confirm or not, or you could do a search.

One thing to look out for in the next several vet visits, is that severe cases of gastric torsion can damage the heart from the stress - maybe ask the vet to pay special attention to that in the next checkup. I had a friend whose dog ended up dieing from heart failure related to damage done during a particularly severe bloat + torsion. The failure occurred several years after the bloat, but the heart damage was apparent pretty soon after recovery.
Can the bloating alone endanger their lives like torsion?

On a side note, does the size of a GSD affect his chances for bloat and torsion?
 

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I believe that it can. My understanding is that if severe enough, bloat alone can be sufficient to limit circulation in the stomach wall. The dog that I referred to before bloated numerous times after gastroplexy (she was obviously highly susceptible) and every time the vet (or e-vet) treated it as an emergency. Now, I understand that a gastroplexy is not necessarily 100% foolproof, so that may have been simply to ensure it hadn't failed and that there was no torsion involved.

As far as size goes, I have not heard or read anything about size being an issue. Most information refers to the depth and width of the chest relative to others of the same breed - deeper and narrower associated with increased likelihood. In my opinion, there doesn't seem to be much really known about likely causes. I haven't seen any objective studies - just references like: 'it seems to occur more frequently in/when <fill in the blank>'.
 

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I am also in West Virginia. If I can help you with dog food sources, please just let me know. Believe me, I know how challenging it can be around here ;).
 

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I just wanted to add some of what I have experienced both with my own male that I lost to GDV and with a number of friend's dogs...

Yes, a dog that has suffered a GDV is more likely to experience the issue, or bloat alone, again. My male suffered a bloat incident and 12 weeks later a severe GDV.

Another very serious situation that I have both seen and heard of happening often after a GDV treatment and stomach staple is what is called Mesenteric torsion. This is a twisting of the nerve bundle that basically attaches the stomach and intestine. This is a *very* serious condition and unfortunately not usually caught in time for veterinary treatment. :( It is deadly. Symptoms are usually the dog being in distress (obvious pain) no outward physical signs other than possible bloody stool. It hits fast. I mention it so that you can be aware to watch for it and at least have the chance to react if it happens.

My advice is to feed a highly digestible food WITH canned food mixed in (or some raw meat mixture) as studies show that moisture mixed foods tend to be better tolerated and digested on a believe it was a 1-3 ratio. I also suggest Linda Arndt's site for some basics and advanced information on feed, feeding, bloat and as well as current trends and thoughts on bloat and GDV. Great Dane Puppies Pet Health | Dog Diet, Nutrition, Giant Breed Puppy Foods | GREATDANELADY.COM

I can suggest some really excellent foods based on their cook rate/digestablity and metabolised energy rates as I have researched foods like these extensively but I'm not going to post names on the thread as it seems to lead away from the topic and cause debates about foods. Feel free to message me for some suggestions and I would be happy to help.

Cherri
 

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Does anyone have a good website for post bloat info? I have googled this a couple times and haven't really been able to find anything helpful. Most things that come up are just peoples stories on what happened to them.
There is a sticky thread on the health forum regarding bloat. What to look for on symptoms etc. My guy was too old for surgery but we gave him metocrapimine (ap) to ease digestion. He lived to b 14 1/2 1 year post bloat
 

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Bloat implications for health - the pressure exerted by the stomach or other digestive tract organ on the other organs (heart, lungs, kidney, liver) can damage them. It can damage them to the extent that part of them die or atrophy. It is a big trauma for them.

After care - I fed canned food for a week or so. And limited excersize as people have talked about - leash walks and crate rest. She bloated at 7 and lived to be nearly 15.

So far as kibble goes, I would look at what Whole Dog Journal has to say about looking for a good kibble. Then I would try one mixed in with the old food and see how it goes. I will say that I bought expensive, very healthy ingredient style kibble and what I got was pudding poop. My dogs are on a good kibble but not the best sounding stuff out there. Pudding poop means their digestive tract is not processing the kibble correctly.
 

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Yes, Gas-x (simythicone sp?) can cause problems. It pulls moisture from the intestine wall. I would try not to use it often. It was one thing contributing to loose stools for a period with the Barker Sisters.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
I would just like to thank everyone for their time, and advice. Damien is doing very well and can't wait to run, and play with his ball. He gets his stitches out on Monday and thanks to all of you I now have a laundry list of questions for the vet :). I will update in a few days with questions, and answers from the vet. Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I don't know if anyone is still looking at this thread but I just wanted to post an update from the Vet visit on Tuesday to get stitches removed. I also wanted share some of the answers I got from the vet. If you do not agree with the Q/A I provide please don't take it personal. I did not agree with some responses from the vet but I just want to share them with everyone.

Most importantly Damien is making a great recovery and is healthy. I think he is going stir crazy but is making the best of his downtime.


Q/A

I asked the vet if there was any need for follow up blood work.
He told me there was no need that he was healthy, and will make a full recovery.

I asked if he is likely to suffer bloat or GSD again
I was told it was not likely, but is possible. He told me that it is very unlikely since his stomach is tacked.

How much longer should he be on restriction from activity
The vet said he was ready for normal activity. This is where I was really concerned. I began to question this since he was only 13 days out of surgery. I was then told to keep him from high impact activity for another week, but that he could run and didn't need to be leash walked.

I asked about his diet, and easily digestible food
Vet said didn't really need to do anything with his diet just limit his activity before, and after eating. I asked about what food he recommended, and told him about my dogs picky eating. I was told to feed him whatever food I wanted. I was told if he only wants to eat Kibble N Bits then give him that.

Lastly I asked about bloating being hereditary
The vet seemed unsure, and said it is hard to tell since it can happen in any dog.

If nothing else I hope all the info on this thread can help someone who is new to the bloat experience. I am still open to all info, and comments.

Thanks,
Mike
 

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BTW my boy Riley was on Orijen when he bloated.
It is a great food, but it did not prevent the
bloat for us.
The fact of the matter is we don't know what causes bloat. All we know that is backed in scientific study is that the larger the dog, and the narrower & deeper the chest, the greater the likely hood.

Thats all that current fact supports

My male had bloat surgery at about 2 years of age. Never had a problem before or after. Full recovery, we train hard now
 

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Mike:

Most vets get next to nothing in the way of an education in nutrition, so I would not take your vet's statement to heart that Damien should eat Kibbles and Bits if that is what he wants. If you have a Tractor Supply Co. store near you (as I do in West Virginia), please consider switching Damien to something of better quality such as Taste of the Wild (no corn), Blue Buffalo (no corn), Merrick (no corn) and they also sell Purina Pro Plan's Sensitive Skin and Stomach too (no corn). The other Purina Pro Plan varieties do have corn, so I would not use them in a dog that has already bloated. Another choice that has also been suggested is the Tractor Supply 4Health kibble and it is a good choice too. All of these brands are available at my local Tractor Supply store and should be available for you and Damien as well.
 

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I hope that he's still doing well post-surgery.

Most dogs make full and uneventul recoveries from bloat. Because of the "gunk" and the prolonged distress that your boy was in, I might consider having bloodwork run in about 3 months (unless you see indications earlier), just to see how everything is doing, and get a baseline for the future.

After my boy bloated, I did make a diet change, and went to homecooked 100%. He was at about 50% before.
Can I ask what you are feeding?
 
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