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As you all know from past post I have been training other people's dogs. I have a puppy problem and probably easy one to fix and am kind of embarrased to ask how to fix this.

This puppy has been having trouble walking on the leash and has gotten a whole lot better since I have worked with it, but one thing I have trouble with is the puppy tries to bite/play on the leash. What advice would you have to fix this.

I love running into new problems and reseraching and talking to others. I believe its the only way to learn. Can't wait to hear the advice.
 

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Personally (being a new dog owner at my wits end) I actually bought a metal leash. Jerzey learned pretty quickly that it wasn't enjoyable to chew on. We'd try her out on the regular nylon leash every once in a while and eventually she just stopped chewing on it. I'm sure there is a better way to do this... especially because metal leashes are a pain in the
for the person actually walking the dog, but that's what I did and it worked.

Good luck.
 

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As a new GSD owner myself I went through the whole leash biting ordeal and tried numerous things to make it stop. The most effective I would have to say was ignoring it completely, and when that didn't work, I would make Harley sit and focus on me or other different commands. I would follow this by normal, calm walking and a reward after he calmed down.

Also, when I started to jog with Harley he would geek out and think we were playing a game and jump and bite the leash. I would then try to ignore it or I would walk and make him relax and obey simple commands to get his mind out of the "let's play" mentality.

Hope this helps and like I said, I'm a novice but Harley has grown out of trying to eat his leash! Good luck!
 

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How old is the puppy? I allowed Falkor to chew and tug on the leash as a puppy. I figure walks should be fun. As he got older, we would play a bit, but stop and walk when I decided. He just stopped doing it around 9-10 months old. I either used cheap nylon leashes that were okay to chew up, or a good heavy-duty leather leash that held up to all his tugging and biting.

Just wanted to offer a different perspective. It all depends on what your expectations and goals are.
 

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Yes, I'll also add that I don't really care if certain dogs chew on the leash. In fact, one of my dogs, Maci, will chew and tug on a leash the entire time while out on a walk (yes, half the time she walks backwards because she is tugging). We have alot of fun while out on walks and I don't mind her antics.

Having said that, if your goal is to teach dog to walk politely on a leash, then this may not be what you want to encourage.

Christine
 

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Originally Posted By: CastlemaidHow old is the puppy? I allowed Falkor to chew and tug on the leash as a puppy. I figure walks should be fun. As he got older, we would play a bit, but stop and walk when I decided. He just stopped doing it around 9-10 months old. I either used cheap nylon leashes that were okay to chew up, or a good heavy-duty leather leash that held up to all his tugging and biting.

Just wanted to offer a different perspective. It all depends on what your expectations and goals are.
I do the same as Lucia. My puppy leashes (the ones I use on walks) look like heck. They're really rather embarrassing.


But my kids stop messing around with the leash when they're about 4-5 months old. Why? Because when they start chewing the leash, I just stop. I don't say a word. I don't get frustrated and sigh heavily. I just watch my little sweetie and enjoy his puppyhood. I think about the fact that they grow so quickly, and I try to really absorb the sweetness of the moment.

Suddenly, puppy realizes "hey, we're not going anywhere!"

At that point, he'll usually continue to hold the leash in his mouth, but he'll start walking. I speed up a bit, so the walk feels even more exciting, and I make sure that we hit several of the best sniff spots. Pretty soon, pup realizes that the only way to get the exciting walk is to stop messing around with the leash. And he does so on his own.

I never have to say a word.


ETA: I also use the same approach for teaching heeling when my pups are older. After they've been taught the basics of heeling, if my dogs pull, I just stop. So I think that this approach works perfectly for teaching polite walking. My kids learn that their behavior makes the walk continue. We can (and have) stood in the same spot for 10 minutes (when they're older). Ultimately, THEY control the walk. For me, it's a great lesson to learn, and the earlier, the better.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
All again thank you so much. I am actually going to cut and paste and e mail some of the advice I like to my client.

I really like 3k9Mom advice of just stoping and letting him/her be a puppy but wants the puppy realizes we are not going anywhere he/she will stop.

This is SMART labradoodle. The main reason I got hired was to stop the puling on the the leash. We have been very successful at that.

I do not have tons of experience with puppies but have quickly learned patience is a virtue with puppies because their attention span is so short.

This LABRADOODLE is 5 months old and a lot of fun to work with because she picks things up so quickly.

But this is one problem I wasnt sure was ok because in the back of my mind if she chews on the leash I don't want her to think its ok to chew on other things in the house as well.

But I think I am going to relay to just stop and let her play.

Any other puppy training advice would be great also. I love to learn and here everyone's perspective on what they do and what works and what doesnt.

I really love this board.
 

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LOL in fact quite a few years ago, I've had a same problem while trying to help train my neice's puppy. She will be excited and considered the leash a game. Everytime we stepped out for a walk, she would jump up and bite and chew on the leash. Then, I thought long and hard about how I was to help her natually correct this problem. When I got home, I found my wife had bought some over-the-counter Bitter Apple Oil to counter my daughter's thumb sucking issues per the pediatric doctor. So, after tasting it, I'd made sure it was safe for canines as well.

Next day, I would rub some on the leash and take her on a walk. As soon as she took the leash and started chewing, it was evident that she disliked the taste and spit it out almost instantly. While I had my laughs, we continue walking and all she did was stared at the leash.

Later on, we stopped at the bench and gave her some playtime and dangled the leash over her a few times. She got excited and took a bite at the leash only to spit it out again instantly. We tried a few more times and soon after, she ignored the leash and got lots of praise and rewards..

Hope this helps.
 
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