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Had prelims done on my boy today, along with some other stuff. X-rays came back far from perfect but not horrible. He's 5 months a week or so shy of 6, un neutered and raw fed. I have kept him quite lean, and he has good muscle for his respective age and moves well. The question the vet had for me is whether to interfere now or let him develop and see was happens. Thoughts?:confused:
More familiar with Mals, GSDs develop so different lol
 

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What do you mean "interfere now"?
 

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He had a loose walk that im now finding out isn't that odd for a GSD pup, Like I said im used to Mals. I also like to get an early check on how growth plates and stuff are going. Vet said the poor coverage on the right could be a problem. Breeder said dad was looser too as a pup but grew into OFA "good" hips. I guess the real question is what do you guys think anything I should be rely concerned over or is the vet just getting my blood up?
 

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I'd let the dog mature and reevaluate...

Glad to see how proactive you are....much more than myself.....but there is a bit of " Que sera sera " to the situation....If he's a bit loose and your concern regarding the growth plates fully developing properly....I'd exercise the dog in a hearty fashion which takes all your observations/concerns into application.

SuperG
 

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is the vet an ortho?

Personally, if that dog is not having any issues I would not rush into surgery for those hips, if that was what the vet was suggesting.
 

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Those would probably get ofa good if he was old enough to be evaluated. I'm not a vet and this is just my opinion so take it for what it's worth, but your vet is nuts. That dog should never have hip issues for his entire life.
 

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The hips could get better or worse from here.

Folks isn't there some healthy joint protocol that might be a good idea for this pup -- diet, exercise that will give this guy the best shot of reaching however good his hips can potentially be?

I have heard to use vitamin C, that the pup can absorb so it may be a special vitamin C, and there may be other supplements that promote healthy hips. Careful not to overdo calcium.

Regular walks, and swimming to build up the muscle tone, and do not force the pup to climb or jump. At the same time, let the pup be a puppy.

HD is genetic, but there does seem to be an environmental component to hip/joint health.

Good luck with the puppy. As for interference, I would interfere by adding the best supplement for joint health that people with GSDs recommend, and the exercise, and by not doing agility or anything like that until he is quite full grown. But no surgery. What would you do surgically to those hips? They do not look bad at this point. Yes, some puppies are loosey goosey at times.
 

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Thanks for the quick feedback everyone! No the vet is not a ortho, but I'm happy I got it done so I can get an inside view of what's going on (thinking back now I should have done elbows too). I'm going to start adding more chicken feet and breed trachea to bluster his glucosamine and chondroitin intake, he's also on ester C. I will be watching carefully the calcium intake as I do for all my pups. As for exercise I will continue to let him free run and play at the daycare I used to work at. Any other advice is greatly appreciated.

Dan&Hektor
 

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You do realize that Ester C has calcium in it, right? And that you should look for a product with bioflavinoids in it to give a more complete C complex?
 

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Yes I know ester c has calcium, what he gets there I just subtract from the raw diet, any one in particular you would recommend?
 

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Since I have my golden with hip dysphasia I am always watching for signs with Apollo(6 month old GSD) not that there were any with the golden. The vet was able to manipulate his back end without issue. He told me that right now everything is going towards him growing. So I keep him lean, feed a good food with raw bones and chicken feet a few times a week. I also take him swimming. I figure I might as well build that muscle now.
 

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. I'm going to start adding more chicken feet and breed trachea to bluster his glucosamine and chondroitin intake,

Dan&Hektor
The only negative I have heard regarding trachea in a dog's diet ( even though I do feed it to my dog )...is the potential for diet induced hyperthyroidism. Two different vets seemed knowledgeable about this when discussing my dog's diet. It also seems besides the trachea there are other raw components which could be suspect as well. The contention is, the active thyroid tissue consumed by the dog can perhaps have consequences.

This article by Dr. Becker discusses the subject.

What Is Hyperthyroidism in Dogs and How to Treat It

SuperG
 

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I feed tracheas all the time. They thyroid gland is not attached to it. It is not an issue.

If you do get the part with the thyroid gland, just cut it off.
 

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I feed tracheas all the time. They thyroid gland is not attached to it. It is not an issue.

If you do get the part with the thyroid gland, just cut it off.
Yes, this is exactly what I said to the vets.....they however suggested that during the processing there is "contamination " between the thyroid and other components used for food for the dog as well as this excerpt from the article.

"Many people don’t realize the thyroid glands aren’t the only place active thyroid hormone secreting tissue can be found. Studies have shown that minute amounts of active thyroid tissue are often located all along the trachea, even into an animal’s chest. Dogs fed raw animal necks can absorb thyroid hormone from the still-attached thyroid glands or other pieces of active thyroid tissue in the neck. And as the three recent studies prove, the amount can be enough to cause symptoms of hyperthyroidism.
In raw diets for dogs, the most likely source for thyroid tissue is in meaty bones including the necks of chickens and other small prey animals like rabbits, as well as the necks of large livestock.
To avoid diet induced hyperthyroidism in your raw fed pet, my recommendation is to make sure you are feeding a variety of protein sources and cuts of meat (thigh meat, etc.) so that your dog isn’t eating a steady diet of raw meaty bones/necks that could contain active thyroid tissue."


I'm not overly concerned about feeding trachea to my dog but keep it at a lesser amount than I used to.....




SuperG
 

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Sorry. This thread is about your dog not mine.
But, I was drawn to your post because you mentioned Lax hips.
My pup just turned 7 mos. and I've noticed that sometimes when he sits, his haunches splay out loosely/relaxed (i hope the haunches are thighs?).
And when he rests on one hip the opposite haunch drops down.
When I figure out how to start a thread I'll include a picture and hope these same people will remark.
I was wondering if that is a sign of Lax hips.?
I noticed the thighs of the other GSDs in his class are tucked in.
Thanks. Your pup is beautiful.
 
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