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Larry Krohn is trainer who posts on YouTube. He recently posted the following on Facebook. I think it really gets to the heart of training:

Larry Krohn
1 hr ·

If you're struggling in any area with your dog ask yourself a couple HONEST questions:

1. Is my dog crazy about me and want to interact with me more than anything else? (Relationship)
2. Is the communication there? Does my dog actually understand EXACTLY what I want? (Training)
 

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These are good questions. I've seen people calling dogs bad or dominant or aggressive when what I see is a confused dog. My worst training mistakes have been those caused by confusion (I am the idiot that shutdown my dogs with hotdogs & clicker, oops, sorry Sonic).
I really like Larry Krohn, btw, especially to watch him engage/play with the dog, he has good mannerisms there and includes softer/pet temperament dogs. (dogs that are not like Malinois or workingline gsd's)
 

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I think Larry is a real dog guy. He gets dogs, and they get him. He's also fun to watch and easy to learn from. I'm a long time fan.
 

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I really like Larry Krohn, btw, especially to watch him engage/play with the dog, he has good mannerisms there and includes softer/pet temperament dogs. (dogs that are not like Malinois or workingline gsd's)
As a newbie...

Several times a day I ask myself how Larry would handle a situation. I almost always find myself saying, "How can I make this more fun for the dog." 9 out of 10 times it ends up making it more fun for both of us. For example, Ole quickly grows bored while working on the basic obedience skills which I want to be very solid and reliable. Doing them rapid-fire and throwing in a few random words makes things interesting again.

Another Larry thing is to keep things moving. I like to spread several carpet samples around the room. Instead of just working in one place, we move around constantly. If we are too still, my dog gets bored which means I get bored. I got that from watching his dog hop from place to place as if the act of moving was the greatest thing in the world. While moving doesn't help the dog learn any better, It helps build focus on me and keeps the dog interested and wanting more... which does help with the learning.

I find his philosophical rambling insightful. They helped me internalize the idea that going through a sequence of steps to teach a command is a very small part of dog training. That part is critical and takes time, but it is the consistently implemented philosophy that makes the biggest difference.
 

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@davewis Gosh, I love what you have said, I love that this is how you have taken larry krohns advice. I think he would love to hear it too. I've heard him say that he is sad he is known at 'that ecollar trainer', that there is so much more than that tool. I'm glad to hear that his broader message is heard.
And I'm with you on the fun stuff, and the keep things moving, the multi-carpets is a fantastic idea.
If we are too still, my dog gets bored which means I get bored.
Me too!
 

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If you're struggling in any area with your dog ask yourself a couple HONEST questions:

1. Is my dog crazy about me and want to interact with me more than anything else? (Relationship)
2. Is the communication there? Does my dog actually understand EXACTLY what I want? (Training)
BOOM!
 

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.....going through a sequence of steps to teach a command is a very small part of dog training. That part is critical and takes time, but it is the consistently implemented philosophy that makes the biggest difference.
A long time ago I read something and I wish I could recall where it was from. But the gist of it was than when you're training your dog you're not just teaching a particular skill you're also teaching your dog to learn. Even silly tricks that don't have any particular practical application are beneficial, because all training is building your relationship and connection with the dog. The more you train, the more he learns how to learn and the better your connection is, which makes additional training easier and more fun.

I recently taught Cava to back up into a handstand. Do I need her to know how to do this? I can't think of any reason why I would, although that kind of exercise is good for rear end awareness, which is may help us while we train her flyball box turn. Or it may not. But she's pretty much game for whatever I want to do with her, it's mostly me trying to figure out how best to communicate what I'm asking of her that holds us up. If I can make her understand, she's going to try her hardest to do it because she values that engagement - us doing something together, whatever it is.
 
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