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Discussion Starter #1
I want to take my pup out but the amount of attention she draws in more public places is a huge pain in the rear,hordes of people come over and I find myself constantly having to ask people not to touch her and often other people will come and stroke her while I'm distracted telling them.

The only 2 possible solutions I can think of are bringing a friend along as crowd control,or buying a collar/lead telling people not to pet her.

Anyone have any other solutions that won't involve wearing a stupid looking collar or having a second person?
 

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Avoid super crowded places. Pick places that have some people, but not more than you can handle or else bring a friend along. Don't stay in one place either, keep moving, if you are stopped you are a sitting target. If you are going to take your puppy out in public then people wanting to pet her are going to be part of the deal until she is past the super cute phase.

I have never used the patches so no idea how well they work. I don't overdo public places with a young puppy since people do tend to freak out and think they must touch the puppy or else they will die. I choose quiet places at off hours so I do not have to ward off a ton of people. Also if you appear to be busy training you puppy vs just standing or sitting people are less likely to interrupt you.
 

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I can personally say that the patches and/or leashes with "DO NOT PET" on them don't do that much. People tend to not even read when they're thinking, "Look at the cute puppy!" The patches certainly help sometimes, but I don't think it will make a huge difference for you. I would just avoid big crowds like that until she's 4-5 months when she isn't a super cute little puppy. I noticed a difference in people wanting to pet my boy when he got about 5 months old.

Also, if someone heads toward you and you are having a hard time keeping them away, just tell them she's not friendly. I know it isn't ideal, but that really makes people stop and think.
 

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You can also stop people dead by telling them your puppy has mange, which technically all puppies do. A simple "Oh please don't pet her she has mange" or "Thank you for asking, but she has mange" is going to stop most people. :D
 

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Avoid super crowded places. Pick places that have some people, but not more than you can handle or else bring a friend along. Don't stay in one place either, keep moving, if you are stopped you are a sitting target. If you are going to take your puppy out in public then people wanting to pet her are going to be part of the deal until she is past the super cute phase.

I have never used the patches so no idea how well they work. I don't overdo public places with a young puppy since people do tend to freak out and think they must touch the puppy or else they will die. I choose quiet places at off hours so I do not have to ward off a ton of people. Also if you appear to be busy training you puppy vs just standing or sitting people are less likely to interrupt you.
I think this is good advice. And it will die down as the dog matures. Everyone wanted to pet my dog when she was tiny, and as soon as she was recognizable as a GSD (ears up, saddle pattern emerging), that number decreased sharply. It goes from, "OH SO CUTE!" to, "OMG IT'S GOING TO EAT ME!" relatively quickly.
 

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Come to my neighborhood and walk your puppy. When Shelby was a young puppy - like 2.5 months old, people were already afraid of her and crossing the street. Never saw anything like it in my life. Crazy.
 

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Even in less crowded areas, even with a leash that says DO NOT PET in silver reflective letters, even with an 85 pound dog who has, even if he is in a great mood, "suspicion eyebrows" (or skeptical at best), I deal with this. I usually barely have time to say "no he is in training" before they are in our space.

I have been working hard on distractions and greeting manners with my dog. His dad was a police dog, it shows. He does not bite or growl at this point, but he does not like when strangers squeal and ruffle his fur or loom over him. TBH I am happy if NOBODY pets him while we are out. He does great with anyone he needs to do great with. All kids, my kids, my kid's friends, likes my neighbors, likes my kid's therapists that come in everyday after school. Once someone is known, or if I obviously known them and greet them, he is FINE. Accepting, a little aloof. Until you are a regular then you are a friend.

He just does not like when complete strangers rush up to him going AWWWWWWWWWW and putting their hands all over his head and neck. Can you tell I just had an "annoying people" weekend??lol

At the end of the day, if you are going to be out and about with a dog you have to unfortunately deal with it. And at the end of the day you will have to be in control of your dog even if the other people are at fault. That is why training in quiet less crowded places will be your best bet, even then people will be inappropriate.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the replies,I was a bit peed off when I wrote this thread,there's no such thing as people repellent so I will just have to work around it unfortunately.
 

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Tell them she is a puppy and she bites. I never let strangers touch any of my dogs without asking permission.
Do you think people will really believe that? Especially if the puppy is wagging its tail and showing enthusiasm to meet and greet?
 

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Do you think people will really believe that? Especially if the puppy is wagging its tail and showing enthusiasm to meet and greet?
Ha, well you know the story of my little landshark who always looked cute but could draw blood. He looked cute and waggy, too. Do you let strangers play with your puppies?
 

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I used to be more guarded in the past but I have relaxed my attitude about it. I do carefully supervise interactions. But to be honest, it is not too often that people approach my dogs or puppies and I usually have an appropriate adult dog with us when taking a puppy out.
 

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I want to take my pup out but the amount of attention she draws in more public places is a huge pain in the rear,hordes of people come over and I find myself constantly having to ask people not to touch her and often other people will come and stroke her while I'm distracted telling them.

The only 2 possible solutions I can think of are bringing a friend along as crowd control,or buying a collar/lead telling people not to pet her.

Anyone have any other solutions that won't involve wearing a stupid looking collar or having a second person?
Tell people to back the _____up! I STILL have this issue and my dog does not like strangers and is an adult dog. It's annoying and I stopped any pretense of polite years ago. Dogs are not public property and I am sick of people thinking they are.
 

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My one last thought-- the universal stop sign hand-- you know arm outstretched with palm facing approaching person? That's my #1 go to, especially with kids, as they seem to comprehend that a little quicker than words.

It will often give someone pause if they aren't already on you, and give you time to say something

My personal favorite: Patch featuring Gandalf silhouette that says "You Shall Not Pet"

@Gandalf your dog should really have that one
 

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How old is your pup? I'm of the same belief that I don't want strangers petting my dog when he is an adult, but as a young puppy socialization is important. I want him to interact with as many strangers as possible. I usually ask people to make him sit and hand him a treat.
 
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