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I wanted to know what suggestion/tips that you may have for me to keep my dog calmer. For example, I attend a group training class that my Dog trainer has on the weekends. When we get out of the car Sadie is excited and pulling to get to the group. What is the best way to break this to have her walk more calmly to the group? Any specific videos or training tips for this? Once we get to the group she will settle after a few minutes and will work for me well. Thanks for the help.
 

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For one thing, I wouldn't EVER reward the pulling. If she's pulling, you stand in the exact same spot and don't move until there is slack on the leash, even if that means you have to get there half an hour early to not be late. Give her high value treats when she's walking nicely. Also, I wouldn't let her out of the car until she's sitting calmly and giving you eye contact. This is about impulse control. From the very first day my puppy came home, he learned that tension on the leash=not moving anywhere, and he now never pulls, even in exciting environments. He's only 7 months old. I also always carry treats on me and randomly give him a treat when he's walking alongside me. Your dog will probably take a lot longer to learn this if she's been allowed to practice it, but if you stay 100% consistent, she will get it.

Are you only asking about the pulling on leash or general settling in the house or?
 

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For one thing, I wouldn't EVER reward the pulling. If she's pulling, you stand in the exact same spot and don't move until there is slack on the leash, even if that means you have to get there half an hour early to not be late. Give her high value treats when she's walking nicely. Also, I wouldn't let her out of the car until she's sitting calmly and giving you eye contact. This is about impulse control. From the very first day my puppy came home, he learned that tension on the leash=not moving anywhere, and he now never pulls, even in exciting environments. He's only 7 months old. I also always carry treats on me and randomly give him a treat when he's walking alongside me. Your dog will probably take a lot longer to learn this if she's been allowed to practice it, but if you stay 100% consistent, she will get it.

Are you only asking about the pulling on leash or general settling in the house or?


at home she is perfect and even walking around the home improvement stores and our neighborhood. Its mostly during group classes and at agility when ALL of the dogs are running.
 

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I'm with Pytheis, go early and anytime the dog is not walking next to you calmly stop. Get Sadie back into the position you want, then after a pause start again. Consistency, maturity, and exposure will all help. It takes time.
 

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I wanted to know what suggestion/tips that you may have for me to keep my dog calmer. For example, I attend a group training class that my Dog trainer has on the weekends. When we get out of the car Sadie is excited and pulling to get to the group. What is the best way to break this to have her walk more calmly to the group? Any specific videos or training tips for this? Once we get to the group she will settle after a few minutes and will work for me well. Thanks for the help.
Proper exercise is THE most efficient way to have a clam tempered dog, especially with a working dog breed! With these breeds they need AT LEAST 2-4 hours hard exercise everyday! I prefer long walks when I get home with my boy and he is a dream to work with, many say other wise but a weight vest can be very beneficial as well I use one and its just an added outlet for all that energy and anxiety if your dog doesn't have anyone at home all day, it also helps for health longevity.
 

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Proper exercise is THE most efficient way to have a clam tempered dog, especially with a working dog breed! With these breeds they need AT LEAST 2-4 hours hard exercise everyday! I prefer long walks when I get home with my boy and he is a dream to work with, many say other wise but a weight vest can be very beneficial as well I use one and its just an added outlet for all that energy and anxiety if your dog doesn't have anyone at home all day, it also helps for health longevity.
This is absurd. A GSD doesn’t need 4 hours of hard exercise every day to settle in the house or walk politely on the leash.
 

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This is absurd. A GSD doesn’t need 4 hours of hard exercise every day to settle in the house or walk politely on the leash.
What ever works for you every dog is different, but that is the recommended amount of exercise for a working dog breed also I said 2-4 hours daily
 

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thankfully that 2 - 4 hours doesn't have to be all at once. And if they get their heart rate up with something really active, 15 minutes can be enough for awhile.
 

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This is absurd. A GSD doesn’t need 4 hours of hard exercise every day to settle in the house or walk politely on the leash.
A tired dog is a happy dog and is more easily trained
thankfully that 2 - 4 hours doesn't have to be all at once. And if they get their heart rate up with something really active, 15 minutes can be enough for awhile.
Agreed! 15 minutes maybe for awhile, but hours aday is minimum
 

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I'm finding that with an immature young dog, teaching them to "Self-Calm" is a valuable tool. The Behavior Modification
articles Tier II, Protocol for Relaxation by Dr. Karen, are excellent tests and lessons for this.
Self Calming teaches the dog that instead of acting all hyper and unrestrained they learn to sit or lie down and watch-
whatever is going on. Can't believe it really works. Shortly the dog will voluntarily sit (or lie down) and observe. Their
anxious activity gets curbed . The dog actually stops and thinks before reacting.
Self control. Impulse Control.
Again, the lessons work and work well. You can almost see the dog's brain processing the info. Just google for more info.
 

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I'm finding that with an immature young dog, teaching them to "Self-Calm" is a valuable tool. The Behavior Modification
articles Tier II, Protocol for Relaxation by Dr. Karen, are excellent tests and lessons for this.
Self Calming teaches the dog that instead of acting all hyper and unrestrained they learn to sit or lie down and watch-
whatever is going on. Can't believe it really works. Shortly the dog will voluntarily sit (or lie down) and observe. Their
anxious activity gets curbed . The dog actually stops and thinks before reacting.
Self control. Impulse Control.
Again, the lessons work and work well. You can almost see the dog's brain processing the info. Just google for more info.
Links to this?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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google "Behavior Modification Tier II Protocol for Relaxation"

There's several chapters from Dr. Karen's manual online so keep reading- they're excellent and thanks again to
moderator WI Backpacker for sharing this.
 

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here's the older thread here on self calming:
 

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Whenever I am not doing a focused heel on the training field, I tell my dog to "walk" and have him in any position except on my left side where I do a focused heel. He can be out front some or to the right, but if he is pulling, he gets a prong correction. The suggestion to get your dog's attention and a few seconds of calm before letting her out of the car is a good one. There are too many variable to give good advice on a forum, such as the age of the dog, the lines of the dog, handler hardness of the dog, collar you are using and your skill at using it, etc. With a decent dog from working lines, you don't need to be real heavy handed, but it is usually best at some point to give the pup/dog a prong correction so they can learn to work through it rather than coddle them. If you pup is overly soft or has weak temperament, that is not a good idea. But the fact that your dog is eagerly pulling you onto the field suggests a pop on a prong and holding the leash high and above her head to steer her with the walk command might help. You use "walk" as a separate command so that it doesn't interfere/confuse the dog if you are working on a focused heel.
 

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Whenever I am not doing a focused heel on the training field, I tell my dog to "walk" and have him in any position except on my left side where I do a focused heel. He can be out front some or to the right, but if he is pulling, he gets a prong correction. The suggestion to get your dog's attention and a few seconds of calm before letting her out of the car is a good one. There are too many variable to give good advice on a forum, such as the age of the dog, the lines of the dog, handler hardness of the dog, collar you are using and your skill at using it, etc. With a decent dog from working lines, you don't need to be real heavy handed, but it is usually best at some point to give the pup/dog a prong correction so they can learn to work through it rather than coddle them. If you pup is overly soft or has weak temperament, that is not a good idea. But the fact that your dog is eagerly pulling you onto the field suggests a pop on a prong and holding the leash high and above her head to steer her with the walk command might help. You use "walk" as a separate command so that it doesn't interfere/confuse the dog if you are working on a focused heel.
This is useful for me after bite work and I am walking the dog off the field and he wants to continue to do bite work. You still need to emphasize control
 
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