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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

Just hoping to get some advice and opinions.

So Kai has had some problems with her tummy which we have now figured out and she's doing much better.

However, our vet commented that she is cow hocked. I told him I knew and I've been working as much as I know how with her to build the muscles up (swimming, sand, soft hills etc). He checked and said they were developing well and then went and did the toe test (the one where they put them on their toes and wait for them to correct). First time, she corrected, he did it again and it took her a bit less than a second, then the next time a bit longer and on the fourth time she waited noticeably and then corrected.

aaand since then I'm completely paranoid.

I've been watching her like a stalker while we are out now but I'm aware that I don't really know what I'm looking for.

She is always super happy to play, doesn't hesitate getting up from a sit or a down, she stretches out her back legs in the morning when she wake up (but my previous shepherd did this from a puppy too and she had great hips), and she goes up and down stairs without fuss.

If anyone has any comments or sees anything it would be really great to hear about. Sorry for the video quality and that it's not the greatest views, if it's not enough I'll try and get some more of her.

https://vimeo.com/133732620


Thank you
= )
 

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I'm sorry I can't help on the cow hock issue, the vet said they were developing well, I suggest you try to 'let it go' and enjoy your lovely dog :)
 

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cow hocks are a result of the dog's conformation.
you can improve ligament and cartilage , but the dog will be cow hocked because of his anatomy


taken from this discussion http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/development-socialization/298498-leg-shape-problem.html
wow -- okay then, 11 months , since we are days away from Aug 8. His colour may keep on changing , getting lighter . The problem is his hocks are cow hocked. Best way to explain it is by a set of illustrations done by my friend Linda Shaw who is back to posting observations on her blog as of yesterday. About German Shepherd Dog : GSD Hindquarters | Hindquarters in German Shepherds

excerpt from same "
Cow hocks, is again another serious fault in German Shepherds. Cow Hock is a condition where the hocks tend to turn towards each other. Cow hock can be a result of any of the two conditions…
a) Cow hock due to the entire leg turned out from the hip. In this case the dog tends to stand slightly wider on the rear lags, with the stifle and toes slightly extended outward. Such a condition is considered as normal if the bones in the related areas are straight in connection to each other.
b) Cow hock due to twisting inward of the hock and the stifle joints. Such a condition affects the gait or locomotion of the dog, which in turn adversely influence the working ability of the dog. Cow hock due to due to twisting inward of the hock and the stifle joints can only happen if the bones are twisted, which cannot be considered normal. It is a serious fault."

when the hock is brought towards the center and the feet thrown outward you are broadening the base of support .

It is a fault because it impairs prolonged movement . "

follow HD & Too Skinny --

quote "suggested doing the x ray , not so much for the hips but for the spine --- I am thinking Lumbosacral stenosis , not uncommon in west german show lines , which the SV is abundantly aware of by the way !
I don't mean to scare you . May be totally off the mark .
Do have a look because it will inform you and allow you to make decisions which will contribute to your dog's well being.

Lumbosacral stenosis is a spinal condition of dogs and Cats

Lumbosacral Stenosis (Cauda Equina Syndrome) in Dogs
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I agree Dunkirk haha, she is a lot of fun and she doesn't seem to care so I should try and copy her.

Thanks for the info Carmspack. I don't mind if she's cow hocked =) she's happy to move and can do everything she needs. I guess it's more when she didn't correct her position in the vet he started to mention that it was abnormal for such a young puppy and can be indicative of nerve problems and possibly degenerative conditions.

So really I just wanted to know if she had a normal range of motion going on I guess... I know I'm being paranoid. Sorry guys!
 

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EXACTLY " I guess it's more when she didn't correct her position in the vet he started to mention that it was abnormal for such a young puppy and can be indicative of nerve problems and possibly degenerative conditions. "

which is why I pointed you in the direction of the lumbosacral stenosis -- and the video --- so that you can take a pro active response , with nutrition specifically for nerve health which include full compound vitamin E and A .

ask your vet what was at the back of his mind when he did the test.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I did go through the the LS info, thing is she has no pain, no reluctance to get up or down or move, is more than happy to jump (i think there's a video on there of her pretending to be a grasshopper) and she's always up for playing even if she's tired.

She's been on glucosamine and fish oil since 11 weeks and I will definitely look into the A and E supplements too, thankyou =)

From what the video shows, can you see anything to be alarmed about?
 

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Can you make a video when someone else is walking her away from you? In walk and trot? This one doesn't show it well (as you mentioned).
 

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I think the movement is okay. What you have is function following form. The structure , and the roach in the back will not allow for powerful sweeping motion . But, she does have good rhythm in motion.
 

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I'm pretty new to all this so don't have anything to add re conformation. But re the toe test - if she's a quick learner and a big pleaser, she may have thought that the vet wanted her to stand with her toes turned over and was trying to please by keeping them under.
 

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want to see that this movement is pretty much normal for wGsls then have a look at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O39-KcW60fs

go to the 9 minute mark and you will see a vet examining a 16 month female , including video of her walking and a table examination including the rear foot neurological response test
people are so worried about DM which shows itself at an advanced age -- and diagnosis often incorrect
and here is lumbosacral stenosis which is seen in young animals and becoming more common in particular group of GSD -- which is one of the points made in the video

too bad it is not in English -- but you can get the gist of it --
 

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She has a steep croup and steps in closely when going. This makes her Stand a little cow hocked but nothing major.
She can use more muscle in the rear.

Doesn't look bad by any means though
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks everyone, I appreciate the discussion here and it's good to hear that her movement doesn't strike anyone as something to worry about.

d4mmo: Thanks for your comment. In regards to her rear muscles, do you have any advice? She is 8 months now and starting to push for more exercises which is great. It's winter here now so the core of her free exercise at the moment is parks/fields, we go to the river/beach when it's a clear day and she's in soft and hard sand then and when the temp picks up I still sneak in some swimming which is she loves.)

carmspack: Thanks for the video and the comments re. her form.

McWeagle: I tried to convince myself of that the whole way home =p. Since then I've been harassing the poor thing every couple of days with a toe test and she's corrected so far, so here's to hoping it was a random mishap until I get her xrays done anyway.

Thanks again guys,
 

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Kai at only 8 months she is still very young. Don't bother trying to add any muscle for now. Wait until she is 12-15 months old.

Gsd are more angulated then other breeds so can present lanky and wobbly when young. I'm sure she will fill out and firm up.

My boy is almost 18 months and has changed very much since he was 12 months let alone 8 months old.

Just make sure she gets plenty of gentle free exercise for the next 4-8 months and a good diet and then the sky is the limit as how far you can push her.
 
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