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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all, so Krypto the Superdog - my best friend of 11 years - died on October 1 of this year.

Then, last night, I think I found one of his siblings amid a pack of street dogs here in Kathmandu Nepal. He was dirty, but overall in good shape.

However, I'd like to figure out his back story, and somehow confirm if he is one of Krypto's pups. I think it's Hero, who was given to a friend who has now moved back to America, and during the 2015 quake, lost Hero as all the walls in the compound fell down, and he was not seen again - until perhaps now.

I'll attache some pics, the first is an old photo of both dad and son together back in 2014. The second is a pic of who we think is the son, who would be 8 years old by now. The last photo is one of his incisors, which on both sides seems to be chipped or filed off at the same place. Weird, never seen that before. Have you?

So, he was found without a collar, walks great on a lead (knows "walk left" and "stop" at intersections), but does not seem to know any other command, like sit lie down, or shake. He will sit and lie down when physically placed however.

His disposition is so so like Krypto's: socialized, gentle, calm, does not go after other dogs, can be fed from hand no problem. Even sleeps in the same bed / places around the house that Krytpo did when he was alive. He also marks in the same spots around the hood. So strange... but I don't know how to confirm.

Ps. Another strange point: we have two feral cats who feed here 2x daily. The one that Krypto tolerated, the new dog does too. The one that Krypto hated, is also chased by the new dog. Weird... it's like there is some communication going on here that I don't understand.

But regardless, he has a home here for life...Hero or not.

thx,
Jigs in Dogmandu Nepal
 

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wow - what a story!!!! Poor dog to have been lost in the quake and have his owner leave the country! So happy you found him and decided to adopt him!!!

He certainly looks like Hero...the facial and markings appear to be nearly identical.....what a fairy tale if it is Hero..in any event, it is a fairy tale for this dog to have been adopted by someone after living on the street for that long...

Good luck with him and thank you for adopting him


Lee
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
wow - what a story!!!! Poor dog to have been lost in the quake and have his owner leave the country! So happy you found him and decided to adopt him!!!

He certainly looks like Hero...the facial and markings appear to be nearly identical.....what a fairy tale if it is Hero..in any event, it is a fairy tale for this dog to have been adopted by someone after living on the street for that long...

Good luck with him and thank you for adopting him


Lee
Thx Lee for the support! But I am not sure how long he was on the street. After the quakes, we searched the area and put up flyers. We concluded he'd been taken in by someone, as that happens here a lot with purebreeds (they have value, and GSDs are usually used for security, by being locked in a cage all day and then let out into a compound at night).

Perhaps he escaped a prison like that. The biggest clues so far are: the teeth anomaly (how would that happen?), and the fact that his nails are clipped. He was dirty, but not more than a month dirty... more like he was extremely dusty. No ticks or fleas that I can find (very unusual, as even indoor dogs get that here). He also has no cuts or bite marks on his front, just one bite in the ass that's healed over. He sure does not like to fight, as he goes up to all street dogs encountered so far with a wagging tail.

What's really funny is how the street dogs I've walked past for years (with Krypto), treat this little new one the same - with extreme caution. I can even see confusion in some that knew Krytpo and I well; it's like they do a double take!

I feel obligated to figure this out - is it Hero or not? There is a possibility that the doggie sleeping at my feet right now, is a stray and someone is looking for him :( More likely is that there is something wrong with him, and he was discarded. And that theory works even if he is Hero, and he's just been cared for by someone else for the past two years.

I wish I knew how to tell the age of GSDs more finitely. We know the age Hero would be, and if I can figure out how old the John Doe here is, I could at least rule out or in by age. I guess I'll know more after I can get him to the vet. Well, thx again for reading!
Jigs
 

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I have a daughter in Nepal. Last week she sent me photos of the street dogs in her neighbourhood wearing tika (red powder on their forehead and paws), and marigold garlands. The dogs got special treats and dressed up for Kukur Tihar - the festival honouring dogs. In her neighbourhood the street dogs are all in good condition. I'm guessing your german shepherd Hero was a street dog in a neighbourhood that looked after their street dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
The real situation in Nepal

I have a daughter in Nepal. Last week she sent me photos of the street dogs in her neighbourhood wearing tika (red powder on their forehead and paws), and marigold garlands. The dogs got special treats and dressed up for Kukur Tihar - the festival honouring dogs. In her neighbourhood the street dogs are all in good condition. I'm guessing your german shepherd Hero was a street dog in a neighbourhood that looked after their street dogs.
Wow, small world eh? Yes, Kukhur Tihar is the one day that most all Nepalese treat dogs kindly, then its back to kicking and throwing rocks.

But I respectfully disagree about the condition of street dogs here. In my work with www.animalnepal.org, I've found that most all street dogs have internal problems (parasites, worms, fungal infections, etc.) - even if they are looking fed, which many are.

Then there is the problem of traffic accidents, as congestion in the city is awful, and the likelihood of hitting a dog, cow or chicken is high. Once a dog is hit, there are few who will care for it outside the occasional good samaritan with extra rupees, or one of the few animal welfare groups like AnimalNepal.

I classify non-pet dogs here in three categories: street dogs, community dogs & strays. Street dogs often run in packs, are very primal, and not friendly or cared for at all. Community dogs are those that are fed by folks (cold store owners, meat shops, concerned citizens, etc.) and are like outdoor "pets" with no real owner, just folks that make sure the animal is fed everyday. These community dogs also provide security at night for an individual house or a marked area, and during the day are mostly harmless. Strays are just lost from a real home, or as often the case, discarded for lack of any proper facility for unwanted pets.

Thankfully, for the last decade or so, Kathmandu residents are embracing the idea of individual pet ownership - as a philosophy and as a business, where dogs live in a home and not a cage out in the yard (although that's the condition for the majority of pets here), and bought from reputable (and un-reputable) breeders.

Krypto and I used to go to local schools and hold pet training sessions, but he recently past. That was great as Krypto was a 40kg monster with the disposition of a teddy bear, and he was very accessible to children. Kids here are raised here to fear dogs (with good reason, as incidences of rabies is a bit high, and real street dogs really bite hard). So these sessions would explain to kids how to deal with the situation, how to approach a community dog or new friend, and how to properly care for a pet at home.

Well, perhaps this new rescue doggie can take his place... we'll have to see...

Ps. Tell your daughter that I said Namaste! and best of times in this magical (and often cruel) land.
 

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Thanks for the Namaste! and a great and informative response, I appreciate the information you shared. The dogs in my daughter's neighbourhood would be in the community dog category.

Her first year in Nepal, (working on an earthquake warning system), managed to be eventful. On a 2 week tramping holiday she got sick. The scenery from the helicopter as she was medevac-ed from Mt Everest base camp was awesome and magical.

Unfortunately cruelty isn't limited to the treatment of animals. People with disabilities, (her current 'project'), particularly in remote and inaccessible regions in Nepal, can experience very hard and difficult lives.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the Namaste! and a great and informative response, I appreciate the information you shared. The dogs in my daughter's neighbourhood would be in the community dog category.

Her first year in Nepal, (working on an earthquake warning system), managed to be eventful. On a 2 week tramping holiday she got sick. The scenery from the helicopter as she was medevac-ed from Mt Everest base camp was awesome and magical.

Unfortunately cruelty isn't limited to the treatment of animals. People with disabilities, (her current 'project'), particularly in remote and inaccessible regions in Nepal, can experience very hard and difficult lives.
Congrats on having such a wonderful daughter doing great work... it can be tough, I know... I came here in 2001 for three months, and just never left. All I do is project work, when I do work. But at 61, all I really want to do is run with the dogs, or something as relaxing and peaceful as that.

If she ever needs anything, tell her to get in touch (but it sounds like she is a tough cookie). I had high-altitude sickness once at Everest Base Camp (Chinese side), and that wasn't fun. Never mix Diamox with pints of Tibetan chang - that's what I learned.
:surprise:

Ps. Do you know how to teach an older GSD to play ball? This one just isn't interested, but come to think of it, my last GSD lost interest at that age as well.
 

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My first german shepherd wasn't interested in balls either. You could try a squeaky ball, and an over-the-top fun and enthusiastic attitude as you toss it around and play with it. He may humour you by joining in :-D
 

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ha, i'm sure my neighbors around the park are enjoying my attempts at this. i did try a crunchy plastic water bottle, but all he cares about is sniffing, and trying to figure out how to get out of the park. he's a character.

Interesting enough, he picks up the ball in the house and runs around with it (for a minute or two), so he obviously knows something about the game. Maybe after he's acclimated more to the new environment...

cheers!
 

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What an interesting dialog! I have been fascinated (but terrified!) by Mt Everest my whole life! To live in the vicinity of such grandeur must truly be amazing! Of course, to those there, it is normal...


Hoping that Hero continues to thrive and become the ambassador for dogs and GSDs as was Krypto!

Thank you!


Lee
 

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What an interesting dialog! I have been fascinated (but terrified!) by Mt Everest my whole life! To live in the vicinity of such grandeur must truly be amazing! Of course, to those there, it is normal...Hoping that Hero continues to thrive and become the ambassador for dogs and GSDs as was Krypto! Thank you! Lee
Thx Lee for the kind words! I felt the same about Everest when I first moved here (fascinated / a bit terrified). Now I'm just terrified. The last time I was there, they were carrying down the bodies they could get to; some had to be left behind. One mountaineer had half his face frozen off.

But since the quakes in 2015, I've been dealing with PTSD and I have not been back into the high mountains since. I am even selling my Royal Enfield, as I don't think I'll be exploring the Himalayans on the back of that anymore. I need four wheels and a GSD in the back to feel safe.
 

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Confirmed by previous owner! We found out today from the previous owner that Hiro is definitely Krypto's pup, and the dog lost in the 2015 earthquake. Thx for all your comments!
Awww, that's wonderful news. The previous owner must be ecstatic with the news.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yes Dunkirk they are. And they have signed over all rights and privileges to us :) now that they have moved back the USA. Now I have to train this old boy up to snuff, if that's even possible. I think I'll give him some more time getting used to the new home before starting. What do u think?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
UPDATE: Years after the rescue described above, Hiro slips out of the gate and disappears into the ether. A few weeks later a friend says he's seen him in front of an open-air meat shop (most of them are here, and that's where the street dogs hang). My pal says he looks weak. Low and behold it's him, 5KM from home and in a neighborhood I've never taken him before. Off his meds, dehydrated and down a few KG, he's now recovering in hospital...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hiro's a very lucky dog.....twice!..
I know! But we need high-tech chips/tags here. He was wearing a collar with a traditional metal dog tag w/name and phone, but no one here will go up to a dog and look at those. A lot of the abandoned dogs here have collars; peeps put them on street dogs thinking that helps.

Apple is working on a tag; I sure hope they get them here soon, so we can start searching for our lost ones using our "smart" phones.
 
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