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Discussion Starter #1
I think you guys, seeing as some of you own them, and many have posted about being rushed by 'pit bulls' ought to read up on break sticks, learn how to use them and get one or two and carry them with you on walks.

http://www.pitbull-chat.com/showthread.php?t=1513

(you can get them or make your own http://catchdogreleasetool.viviti.com/product)
It's a handy thing to have around. And seeing as bulldogs seem to be around every corner, a SAFE thing to have around if you have dogs.

Breaksticks are commonly mentioned in passing on all of my bulldog forums, I thought it would be a friendly thing to let you guys learn about them and how to use, seeing as a member on PB-C was walking his APBT when a GSD jumped it's fence and attacked. The bulldog grabbed it's throat and wouldn't release for several minutes, if either owner had a breakstick...
 

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I need a login to read the article -if you cut and paste it here wtih a link to the original page, I think that's alright with the mods...
 

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question: after you use the break stick to pry their mouth open, don't they attack you? or keep trying to clamp on?

Thanks for the info, I appreciate it! I have been rushed by a bully looking dog before when I was holding my infant, and it is only sheer luck I was next to my van with the doors unlocked so I could jump in with her and call 911 as he attacked the door.
 

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When I first saw someone carrying one; I was suspicious it might be a weapon to attack or intimidate or discipline someone or his dog; I asked him and he explained that it was in case he had to pry the jaws open on his dog. He said he never had to use it; but wanted to be prepared just in case.

A technique that I have seen some people use on pit bulls that have latched onto a dog is to pick up the attacking dog by the neck or shoulder area; in most cases this should prompt the dog to release. Sometimes it takes several seconds to work. I seen the dog whisperer on TV and I've seen a few other people use the technique in person. There was one case where two pit bulls have latched onto each other and each owner grabbed their dog by the neck or shoulder area and pick them up by the scruff of the skin and held both of them in the air pulling them apart. It took a few seconds probably about 5 or 10 seconds for them to release; but it worked. However you have to be strong and in good shape to do that. You also have to be crazy enough to be willing to risk it.

It's risky and dangerous to intervene in a fight whether you're using a "breadstick" or trying to induce puppy paralysis by picking up an adult dog by the scruff like a mother dog would. Picking up an adult dog like that can cause injury to the dog; however it's probably better than letting dogs kill each other.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'll tell you, there is no way in heck you will be able to pick up a bulldog all the way by it's scruff in a fight, and if you tried while it's go another dog, it's going to hurt he other dog, and don't ever just try to pull on off, it will end up causing more harm.

Another way to stop a fight is to choke the dog out. It HAS to let go if it's got no oxygen, obviously this is a more dangerous thing to do, and really can't be done without a collar on the dog...

Breaking up a fight is always dangerous. But I highly doubt many members here would sit by and scream while their dog is either holding tight to another or is being held onto. I know I would shove my hands into the mouth of a strange dog to save my own.


A picture to show(at a bad angle) the use of a breakstick on a bull breed looking dog.



This is a typical fight between mutt bulldogs... The little one is American Bully I'm pretty sure... Just as an example of how a breakstick can come in very handy. It would have been over in seconds. They're lucky it wasn't a bad fight.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXiO_duXa5A
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Bump
Seeing so many posts about pit bulls attacking GSD on here again, thought this should be bumped up for more to see.
 

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Originally Posted By: APBTLoveI'll tell you, there is no way in heck you will be able to pick up a bulldog all the way by it's scruff in a fight, and if you tried while it's go another dog, it's going to hurt he other dog, and don't ever just try to pull on off, it will end up causing more harm.

Another way to stop a fight is to choke the dog out. It HAS to let go if it's got no oxygen, obviously this is a more dangerous thing to do, and really can't be done without a collar on the dog...

Breaking up a fight is always dangerous. But I highly doubt many members here would sit by and scream while their dog is either holding tight to another or is being held onto. I know I would shove my hands into the mouth of a strange dog to save my own.

No, most bulldogs I've encountered (of which 99.9% are great dogs) definitely have tight skin around the back of their neck and there is no way you'd be able to get a good grip, especially on a moving dog. The collar is useful to lift the dog, and I agree with the NOT PULLING on the attacker or victim. I see a lot of people recommending pulling the dogs' hind legs but that's the safest thing for the *people* not the dog who is being bitten. It's not necessarily the best solution for stopping all kinds of fights, but it will keep you from getting hurt.

I've written on here before about the one real dog fight I've ever seen at dog daycare where I had to use the choke method as she didn't have a collar on and had the other dog's ear in her mouth and wouldn't let go no matter how hard I hit her in the face or body. As the attacker was a client's dog, I wasn't about to do anything that would injure her that I would do to a strange dog, like gouging it's eyes or something.

However, the victim being a Staffie with paper-thin ears, I HAD to do something to prevent him from losing it, so I did the last thing I could think of, which was choking her by laying my knee across the back of her neck with her pinned on the ice. Once I got her off I was able to throw her over a fence into an empty section of the outside yard.

That luckily worked and Chopper got to keep his ear, albeit with several nasty punctures and a tear. Fortunately for me I got a bloody sweatshirt and jeans and bruises from slipping on the ice struggling with the dogs, but otherwise was fine. I know it could have been worse, but in a pack of 30-50 dogs it's imperative to stop a fight ASAP lest the others don't see you as the clear pack leader (never a problem for myself) and join in. No dog on MY watch is going to be maimed or killed, so I took that risk. The rest of the dogs gave us a wide berth to let me handle it, with the exception of Nico who hovered a few feet away from me making sure I wasn't being hurt.

<And yes, we do usually have more than one person supervising the large dog group, but it was around the holidays and we were short>


For APBTLove - I was wondering if you have any idea why it is that many bulldogs will not let go when ordered to by their owner? I know that tenacity is a desired trait, but what about obedience? Not trying to stir up anything, but the question just occurred to me.
 

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Originally Posted By: pinkanml
For APBTLove - I was wondering if you have any idea why it is that many bulldogs will not let go when ordered to by their owner? I know that tenacity is a desired trait, but what about obedience? Not trying to stir up anything, but the question just occurred to me.
How many other dog breeds in a full-on dogfight have you seen just "let go" when the owner asks them to do so? I've seen some of the most well-trained, titled, shown dogs wind up in a dogfight with the owners shouting "RELEASE! RELEASE!" and never saw a dog just let go and give up. For dogs, it's a matter of survival not a playground scuffle.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Originally Posted By: pinkanml

For APBTLove - I was wondering if you have any idea why it is that many bulldogs will not let go when ordered to by their owner? I know that tenacity is a desired trait, but what about obedience? Not trying to stir up anything, but the question just occurred to me.
Actually, in a recent house fight between a APBT mix and a bully type pit, the owner gave a command to release, and one dog did.
http://www.pitbull-chat.com/showthread.php?t=50928&highlight=orion

But I would have to say, that due to the amount of breeding to fight, the terrier and bulldog's tenacity and drive, they just go into a frenzy and couldn't give crap what a human is yelling or ordering. Just like JRTs on a few rats, once they get going, you telling them not to won't help, because whatever correction they will get, they obviously find it worth it to continue ratting.



Though with any breed in a REAL fight, like trying to kill pretty much, it's nigh impossible to verbally break them up. When my non-bulldogs have scrapped I can grab one and order the other away, but that's it.
 
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