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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, I don't know how to get this girlie to calm down. When I first see her, she is so excited and I tell her "quiet" and do my arms like in a "enough" kinda way. I'll hold her collar and have her sit and try to pet her, saying "quiet" and "good girl", but she is just crazy. She jumps all over everyone, she scratched my chin yesterday, is for every nipping and still jumping.
H E L P ! ! Please ! !
 

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Don't pay any attention to her at all. When she is jumping it is to get attention and you reward her with the "quiet", even negative attention is attention. Have your guests ignore you until she settles down, no talking, no eye contact, no touching. The same rules apply when you come home, no eye contact, no touching, no talking to her, just walk past her like she doesn't exist.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Great advise, but she is getting bigger and her jumping up is pushing us over sometimes. We turn away, ignore her, but it is a very hard thing to do, when being charged at, and jumped up at, or onto. You sit on the couch and Boom! she comes and jumps at you. We love her very much and just wish she would settle down. She has a kennel in the living room with us, for when my husband can't take any more of her 'puppyness', but she is getting a bit big for that I think. She can still stand in it, but like I said she's getting bigger, 60lb and 6 1/2 months. I have never used a crate/kennel before, husband doesn't like having this one in the room, there's no way there'd be a bigger one, if there is such, other than a huge outside kennel/dog run!
 

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61/2 months,you need to take care of this problem now before it's too late.
have you started basic training?sit ,stay,down?
i would start with basic training,then when she is jumping,use those commands to distract her from jumping."sit"is a good command to start with.have plenty of treats,when she jumps,tell her to sit,or if you can,make her sit before she jumps.
give her treats and praise her when she's sitting.
teaching her to sit when she greets someone is the way to do it.
 

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Tiger is absolutely right. You have to ignore your pup until she calms down and only then should you continue to interact with her. The more that you're attentive to her 'greeting' behaviors, the more she is realizing that if she acts that way she will get what she wants, which is your attention. In a way, she's training you to react to her!


It is a BIG task to remain consistent, but after a while your pup will realize that being calm and collected will produce the desired result. Your attention. Be prepared to sternly inforce the no-look, no-touch, no-talk rules with your family and friends so they understand what you are trying to accomplish. <u>Their</u> execution of the new rules will be just as important as you following them yourself.

And most importantly, remain patient and consistent. It will not change overnight, but remain dilligent in your practice, and before long the jumping and vying for attention will be a distant memory!

Finally, I would look into the NILIF approach to living with your pup. The practice itself can really help provide some great guidance in these times of puppy craziness!! Good luck!
 

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I can ignore a 100 lb dog slamming into me. You just don't say anything, no eye contact and continue on your merry way. I have 4 dogs I walk in the house and there isn't a peep out of any of them, my DH walks in and all you know what brakes out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
How on earth do you manage to ignore a huge 100 lb er?? We will work harder on the ignoring her, she's a good girl really. I have tried to tell her sit as she bounds towards me, or tell the kids the same. Husband is not involved at all, and just won't use the same commands that I use, how much of a problem is that?
 

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Originally Posted By: NinaHusband is not involved at all, and just won't use the same commands that I use, how much of a problem is that?
There's the problem. You have to remain consistent to train a dog. If your husband lets the pup jump up at will, you are going to find it hard to get the pup to stop. This goes for almost every type of training. If you are teaching a heel (or at least a well-mannered) walk and he lets the dog pull like a sled dog, you will be teaching heel for a while.

One other comment is you want to mark a behavior with a dog to train it. If you are saying "quiet, quiet, quiet" over and over again while the dog is jumping on you, you are basically marking the jumping behavior. It is tough, but if you ignore and then the moment the pup sits down / gives up / is quiet on his own you turn around, praise with "Good quiet!" and give him the best treat he has ever had (think meat) you are marking the right behavior.
 

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Nina, I a stubborn cuss. I love my dogs, but the bottom line is, it is MY house, so they WILL learn what is acceptable and what isn't. I have had some major sore spots, some really nasty bruises, but I will do my best to ignore anyone of my dogs that slam into me just to get attention, I refuse to give them eye contact or speak to them. Trust me I have been slammed into walls, door ways, sharp corners of any kind, does it hurt you bet, but the dog really starts to think, geeze I gave it my best shot to get her attention and darn that had to hurt and not a peep out of her, what a tough bitch. The game isn't fun for a dog if they don't get a reaction.

Colorado, my hubby is like a playmate to my dogs. They all know he is a softie and know that you don't mess with the momma. Just like with kids they figure out who the softie is and they use it. So if Nina can get herself on board first, this means no breaking down and slacking, when the kids see the results they will be on board also. Don't ask me about hubbies, because I am not really good at training them.

Val
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you for your replies. Husband just pushes her away and tells her to "Get" or "no, Pearl" "get away", I have tried to ask/tell him to ignore her, or tell her to sit, but I'm talking to a brick wall. As for him walking her, ah? I have had an injured knee for over a month now and I think he may have took her out once!, that makes two or three times in total, we've had her for four months. Even when she knocked me over, I had to walk home, but I told her to walk nicely, and she did, guess she knew I was upset as I was still crying as we were walking, coz it hurt!
I would love to have another dog, as a companion for this one, but know to wait until she is trained more first, and hopefully husband will like her then. ;-)
 

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I, too have a 6 mo. old "power ball". The jumping and mouthing is driving me nuts! On top of that every time I try to put her leash on, she begins biting my hands & chewing the leash. I've ordered a new center ring collar which should help with attaching the leash since the ring stays on top rather than below her mouth.
 

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How much exercise do you give your dog? My GSD is only 4 mnths and very laid back but my boxer can get hard to handle if she does not have an out let for all that energy. Seems overly simple but my dogs sure listen better after exercise exercise exercise.

That said adolesence is a particularly tough time. Keep training.
 
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