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Discussion Starter #1
Can someone please suggest what to do...my GSD is 1yr3m and has started this bad habit of jumping. He usually only does it when we come home from work or somewhere else. He isn't crated when he is home alone, we keep him in our kitchen where he has plenty of room to move around. He also does it to visitors that come as well. He runs around and then jumps full force on the person. I have tried so many things...keeping him on a leash, using my knee, etc. Now, when he jumps and I tell him no or stop he urinates on the floor! With a dog that is 100 pounds, he is going to really hurt me or someone. Anyone have this problem or know what to do about it?

Thanks!
 

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One of the trainers I went to suggested having a stick, yard stick or mop/broom handle near the door. Bang it vertically(holding it near your body) on the floor near the dogs feet a few times. I haven't tried it but she swears that it works. Also by ignoring the dog for about 5 min. every time you arrive will lessen the excitement level of your dog. The Dog Listener written by Jan Fennell is a great book and deals with this. Maybe getting a crate is a good idea as well??
 

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I read that designating a specific spot for your dog to sit when you come home helps, but that sounds like it would take forever.
 

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I've had this problem with almost all of my adopted dogs and fosters. Here's what works for me. I ignore the dog when they're jumping. I simply turn my back to them and do something else. I effectively withdraw my energy from them (I know that sounds weird but it works). Because they are jumping to get attention they pretty quickly figure out that it is not working and so they try something else. In one case I trained a dog to lie down and then he could get attention and in another I trained the dog to get a toy and sit nicely and then he got attention. First I ignore them and then when they figure out they're being ignored I give them a specific command. Pretty soon they skip the jumping and go straight to the other thing.

Training them to stay off of other people is harder. I would recommend a leash for that one.

Also, the peeing is submissive peeing because the dog is getting negative attention from you. That will stop when you ignore them too. DO NOT TRY THAT BROOM THING MENTIONED ABOVE WITH A DOG THAT IS ALREADY SUBMISSIVE. I actually wouldn't do something like that with any dog but definitely not one who is submissive.

You will need to train yourself too. Resist getting upset and work on just ignoring the behavior and turning away from your dog. He will catch on pretty quickly.
 

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Thank you so much...I do need to work on not getting upset. I have tried the ignoring and turning my back, but he just jumps on my back. It is just frustrating because he is so intelligent and learns quickly - but telling him EVERYDAY not to jump seems to elude him?
 

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I have had this problem for three months, my puppy is now 25 weeks/five months old. I have watched numerous video's, read tons of books, paid for a few personal trainers, and she still jumps up, continuously. We ignore her, we turn away, we tell her "NO" "OFF", we distract her etc but she will just jump on our back, bite our sides, legs, our feet, or whatever. So really we have two major problems; jumping and biting.
Days before this past Christmas, she charged into me, (was being followed by another dog), and I have been on crutches, hopping and in a lot of pain, seeing doctors, physio therapists, and have been told this morning I should see a specialist. She unexpectedly jumped at me last night and knocked me over.
Seriously, attila 1012 and I need advise that works, please!
 

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Shadow, like any other high spirited GSD puppy was a serious jumper, especially where my husband is concerned. Now, when my husband comes home he completely ignores the dog while he puts his computer and clothes away, and takes care of any other chores he needs to. Finally, he will sit down in his chair and invite Shadow for a cuddle.

In the beginning, Shadow was all over him, mouthing and jumping. It took a while but eventually we began to notice Shadow was sitting on the floor waiting to be noticed. He will follow my husband around the place and sit, relatively quietly, in each place where my husband stops. When my husband finally sits down to invite Shadow for a cuddle, Shadow is one very happy but contained puppy.

Meanwhile, I have taught Shadow the 'off' command, but that's more for when I want him to get off the bed or the couch. The ignoring method does work. It just takes time. It is not a quick fix but it's a good one.
 

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Seems like everyone has it covered and I'm definitely not a trainer. I can only say that early on I taught my boys to turn their back and ignore the negative behavior, same thing with mouthing. When someone goes to pet and Rocky tries to mouth, we say no and pull our hand away. We then try it again and if he doesn't mouth we pet his head and tell him good boy, basically teaching him, if you want attention you will have to earn it by behaving. Probably 90% of the time he gets it. Greeting people at the door is something we are working on, getting him to sit and I inform company coming over what I would like them to do so that it is consistent and that Rocky knows expectations. I don't know about the clicker training concept but that might be a way to reinforce positive behavior. I know there is a lot of controversy over remote collar, we have one but rarely have to use it and when it is on him the level is turned so low that I put my own finger to it and you just feel the poke, can't say that it is any crueler than a choke or prong collar. It might be the quickest way for your GSD to understand the expectations of greeting or jumping on people and when it is reinforced, it will be engrained good vs bad behavior and you won't even need it anymore. You might want to read some articles on the "alpha dog" stuff, who's in charge, etc....GSD's are a special breed and understanding them better might be helpful.
 
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