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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Brilliant people!


Okay - so Keeva who we acquired by crazy random happenstance is really a good dog but like all things she has some issues.

I have been making steady progress on most of these. She is no longer peeing in the house, she knows some basic commands (sit, down, wait), she is walking on a leash nicely instead of trying to drag me down the street.

The problem that we have that I really need to nip in the bud as quickly as possible is jumping. She jumps on people - which is a problem as I have a disability that causes me balance issues. Also we have an eight year old and a six year old and she jumps up and knocks them over. Now the whole "giving her a stern look and turning your back on her" thing will not do the trick in this instance as she is just as likely to run full tilt at you from behind and jump on your back as she is to jump on your front.

She seems to not want her front feet on the ground most days! she will also jump up on desks, counters, the table - really anything she can reach with her front feet.

I realise that jumping on people and jumping on things are two different behaviors - and right now I am more concerned with the jumping on people.

I have been trying to get her to understand that she'll only get attention if her butt is parked on the ground but this jumping thing is really proving to be a big deal - if I cannot get it under control we probably will not be keeping her.

Tips would be very much appreciated - because other than this one behavior she is a great dog. But both I and the kids have been knocked over numerous times now.

Bea
 

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Fiona has this problem too. Especially if I leave her alone for more than 10 minutes. The trainer said to connect your knee to her chest every time she jumps up. I am too gentle because of the balance thing I can't knee her to hard. So practice. I have even put my hand on her chest and pushed.


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I have even put my hand on her chest and pushed.
That can actually make the problem worse. Dogs will paw at each other to initiate play, so imagine how your dog is going to interpret you pawing at her, which is basically what you're doing by pushing her away with your hand. You're telling her no, stop, but your body language is doing the exact opposite.
 

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Oh gosh - young crazy working line dogs can be rough but they do mature into very nice dogs.

All I can say is lots of obedience and prompting a sit/reward before the jump. Any grabbing the collar, paws etc will just bring on more.

Limited freedom in the house off lead. Always under control. Drag lead. An indestructable bed and the "place" command has saved my sanity. They can be such a handful. They really do grow up into wonderful dogs. She would be your daughters' best friend in due time...but can mature very slowly.
 

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Puzzled here. Emma has this issue to, but not to bad, just when I come home or when she is wound up. She will jump on command when I pat my chest and say up.

So the old school knee to the chest to knock her back and saying OFF is not the thing to do? What should I do?

Being old is tough, especially when the world of training has past you by :D
However, keeping up with Emma makes me feel young again;):):):):wild::wub:

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for the suggestions! We have been putting a lot of them into practice over the past few days.

Keeva is showing improvement - we have also upped her daily exercise which has made a marked difference in her calming down in the house.

We have started putting her "nose" into practice as she was very interested in my Fila's tracking practice. So now she is getting into the game herself. We are also trying to get her interested in moving goats around but so far she finds them pretty intimidating. Then again they are quite a bit bigger than she is.

She really is a great dog - I am just hoping I will be successful in fixing all of the things that should have been done with her as a puppy. She needs a lot more socialization and not just with people but with strange things!

I think she'll settle into have a very steady temperament as she gets older.

Bea & Crew
 

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For what its worth I'll throw my two cents worth in. Lots have been saying it, bringing the knee into the chest with a stern No at the same time. Xena is 9 months old and gets really excited when I come out of the house. At times my fore arms looked like they had been through a cheese grater with all scratch marks, but now she is getting better. We still have moments and it takes time, but I think consistancy and repeated ques is the answer cause they are smart dogs (Sometimes too smart me thinks)
 

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I watched a video once where the trainer would enter the house, and immediately as she entered, she would click and put the treat on the floor before the dog jumped. It had to be FAST before the dog's feet left the floor. She would continue to click, treat, click, treat, always placing the treat on the floor. Her philosophy was if the treat was on the floor, the dog learned to associate the floor with a treat, and having all four paws on the floor to get a treat. We tried this with our dog and had great success. You slow the clicking and treating down gradually, so the dog starts to see that they need to stay on the floor. Eventually, I faded this method out and used the "ignore till their butt is on the floor" method. If he hasn't been worked though, he still will hop off his front feet ever so slightly at first, and then sit. He never puts any weight on me when he jumps anymore though, which to me is the more important part.

If I had more time an energy right now, I would spend time training this every day, and he would be much more solid with it. I will add though, the knee trick didn't work as well for our pup. He definitely is more of a positive-reinforcement learner.

Good luck with whatever method you choose!!!
 
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