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My dog has this very bad habit and I am not sure what to do. Whenever I come home he jumps on me - putting his paws on my back and if I happen to have something in my hair he will try to bite it out. He does this a few times and then neurotically has to grab something - anything- a hanging kitchen towel, something from the counter, and mostly anything on the dining room table and run with it. He only does the jumping on me, not my husband. And today, he even did the jumping thing for no reason - right in front of my husband. He will be 2 in October and I have tried EVERYTHING. I do not know what do - he is 100 pounds and it is really starting to hurt.
 

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Oh gosh, I've had this issue with Emma, she's a jumper too...But I've been working with her, by telling her to sit and putting my hand in her face and telling her NO when she starts to jump...Also have you tried using treats to reward good behavior? Goodluck!
 

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Jumping can be a hard issue, at least I think so. We have 2 very exuberant love everyone and anything gsds...they are about 2 yrs old. They will not jump on me or my husband, we have just had to over and over establish that we are calm and confident and that they will not get any positive reinforcement from doing so.

The hard part for us is that we have people over a lot and go over to other friends houses with our dogs and they will jump on other adults......these adults are usually saying their names in a high pitched voiced and acting excited...I laugh silently when they get a big muddy pawprint on their white shirt as I have tried to tell them to just ignore them and then when everything has calmed down then to give them attention.

I would think about the things, body language your husband gives towards the dog vs what you do. Even if it is a posture, eye contact, or tone of voice, some dogs will pick up on that and take advantage. Allie is notorious for taking every opportunity that someone gives her to place a paw on your lap and the eventually end up in your lap! She is so sweet and everyone knows that so people let her do it, then they can't believe when they end up muddy when she jumps up on them....hey they asked for it! Kelso is more aloof.

There is lots of techniques. Some people do the knee to the chest, others a spray bottle or a loud shaker can. That doesnt work with our dogs. They think it is all fun, or an invite to play. The best is simply ignoring for as long as it takes...as they love attention..either that or placing them in a platz stay for a ball/treat when guests come over and releasing them when they are calm. Or asking them to sit before they get attention.


Also, lots and lota of physical and mental stimulation will often wear a dog/pup out enough that they will not jump! I always make sure this is the case if we are having a group of friends and small children over. You can also give them something better to do, like a kong with treats or a nice raw bone ( a favorite here)

About the running away and taking things off the table, try to teach an off command and dont reinforce the taking of things. Sometimes if you just ignore them (as long as it is not valuable) they will drop it and realize there is no game to be played. But it is good to teach a drop it command in case it is something dangerous or important..you can do that by trading with another treat or toy.

here are some links

http://www.petplace.com/dogs/teaching-your-dog-not-to-jump/page1.aspx

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/jumps.htm

http://www.startribune.com/pet_central/11253586.html

there is many many more links out there if you google it!


good luck! hope that helps!
 

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I have found that the easiest way to fix jumping is to give the dog something else to do. The "off" command is a hard one to teach, especially a young dog. "Off" means "stand there, four feet on the floor." The young dog brain then thinks "and do what?"

A dog jumps because they want to be up near our face, where the action is. So we need to get down to their level and remove the temptation. But in my house, they have to earn that as a reward.

When a puppy jumps (or better yet, looks like he's ABOUT to jump), I tell him immediately, "sit" or "down" or "play dead" or any other command that I know he knows well. As soon as pup starts to execute the command (his bottom starts to hit the floor...) I pull out a treat that I have in my pocket (I always have treats when I'm near my puppy, right?!
) crouch down and reward the great Sit! Hooray! HUGE celebration! Big snacks!

If I'm coming home from work, I have cuzes, balls, frisbees, etc in my car. As soon as I get to the gate, if pup is jumping on the gate or standing there looking like he's reading to jump on me when I open it), I wordlessly toss the toy and yell "fetch!" Puppy takes off running. As soon as he picks up the toy, I yell "come!" He brings it back, I am in the crouched position (down at his level). I hand him a delicious snack, rub him down! Hooray! Good Come! I give him back his toy to carry.(If he dropped it for the snack. If he didn't, he misses out on the snack but he keeps the toy) and we go into the house.

He's forgotten about jumping up on me because I have 1. have gotten down to his level. 2. acknowledged him. 3. made a huge fuss over him. If he starts to jump on me again, I give him a sit command and we start all over until he has gotten the urge to jump out of his pores (sometimes, it takes several attempts, especially starting out).

From my perspective, I've won because I have 1. not gotten jumped on. 2. made our encounter positive. 3. trained/encouraged good behavior.

I have a small puppy. One of those little dogs that most people let jump on people their whole lives and everyone thinks it's cute. I don't let ANY of my dogs jump on people though. When Dh and I get home, or she meets someone, or she runs into the house after playing outside and wants attention, she immediately plops into a sit. If I don't notice her, or my hands are full, she drops into a down. Then a sit again. It's clear she's saying, "hey! PAY attention over here!" She's learned THAT is what gets her attention and treats. Jumping up gets her nothing.

My GSD was trained the same way. Ok, he vocalizes a little too. But from a sit!
 

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BTW, I should add, if your dog is incorrigible, and won't go into a sit, practice with a leash. Step on the leash to correct the jump and lead your dog into the sit. THEN reward the sit.

This works best with two adults. One should leave home, drive around the block. When that person comes home, the dog will be leashed and waiting to spring. Step on the leash. Or grab it, but don't touch the dog (touching is close enough to petting to be reinforcing). And don't talk to the dog, which is also reinforcing the jumping behavior you don't want.

"Fido, Sit." is all you need to say. Lead the dog into a sit, and go from there. Practice all weekend if you have a spouse, S/O, friend, or roommate that's there to help. Don't leave a leashed dog home alone. That's too dangerous. You'll need a friend to help you.

When you visit friends, leave your dogs on leash and do the same thing.

Pretty quickly your dog will realize that instead of lots of touching and talking, and even some of that fun screaming (which kind of sounds like a party!), the only thing he'll ever get when he greets you (and everyone else -- it's a conspiracy!) is one command. So, he might as well skip the command and get right to the good stuff. Your attention and the snacks.

It sounds too easy, I know. But it really does work.
 
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