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I'm not very familiar with the SV naming system other than having the alphabatized litters followed by the kennel name. So can anybody tell me what is the difference between vom, von, van, and der inbetween the dog name and the kennel name? What do those translate out to? Also, if the stud and bitch are from different kennels, does the name contain the stud's kennel name or the bitch's kennel name?
 

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me neither
All I care about is my pooch is happy and healthy
 

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"Von" means from, "vom" from(the), and "der" and "den" mean "the." Unlike Americans, who can name a dog "Mystical Melody Maker's WhisperWind NightSong of Idyllmyst Acres," or "Just All That Jazz of SassySwing's Toe-Tappin' Jam-bo-ree Bandstand," these German name may translate to indicate where the kennel is: "Gleisdreieck" just means "railroad track triangle," "Kirschental" is "cherry valley," and of course my favorite...... "Bösen Nachbarschaft" is "the nasty neighborhood!!"
Can you imagine he founded his kennel name because the neighbors complained about the barking?
I think there may also be "Bösen Brüderschaft" (the nasty brotherhood LOL) and "Rauen Sitten" (rough/brutal ways).
 

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LMAO over here
 

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which word is used in the name, von/vom/van/der, will most likely depend on the usage. von/vam both can mean 'of' or 'from'; van may be from the dutch - it's not really german. 'der' can be 'that', 'the', 'which'....
I spent a year (well, 10 months) in Germany as an exchange student in college, and my friend's host family was in the same town as the university. When they would refer to him, it was invariably "der Michael" - as in, translated, "where is the Michael?"
 

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Let's get the "van" out of the way first - that's the Dutch version of the German "von/vom".

In German, whether you use "von" or "vom" depends on the gender of the noun that follows it. While English only has one definite article, "the", German assigns genders to its nouns: masculine, feminine, and neuter.

For example, the English "the dog" is "der Hund" (masculine), the English "the cat" is "die Katze" (feminine); and the English "the car" is "das Auto" (neuter) in German.

In order to say "from" (as in kennel name or from a specific house or family - not from as in from a city) or "of" (of a specific house or family), you use the word von. How you use the word von depends on the gender of the noun that follows. If the noun that follows is feminine, it is "von der"; if the noun that follows is masculine or neuter, it is "vom" (which is short for "von dem").

So, for example ...

if your kennel name is Haus Mueller, which would be the "house Mueller" - most likely named after your surname - then the dogs would be, Ajax vom Haus Mueller or Anna vom Haus Mueller. "Haus" (house) is neuter - "das Haus".

if your kennel name is "Gruene Aue", which means "green meadow" in German, then your dogs would be named, Ajax von der Gruenen Aue or Anna von der Gruenen Aue. "Aue" (meadow) is feminine - "die Aue".

if your kennel name is "Stolzer Hund", which means "proud dog" in German, then your dogs would be named, Ajax vom Stolzen Hund" or "Anna vom Stolzen Hund". "Hund" (dog) is masculine - "der Hund".

It's the gender of the noun that follows the word "von" that determines whether it is von or vom, not the gender of the dog - just in case that's not clear.


German is a confusing language, ain't it?
 

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Originally Posted By: Historian

German is a confusing language, ain't it?
This is quite true--but your <u>explanation</u> was very clear!

Vielen Dank, Chris!
 

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Chris did a great job explaining the vom/von thing.

To answer this question:
Originally Posted By: shepherdmom12
Also, if the stud and bitch are from different kennels, does the name contain the stud's kennel name or the bitch's kennel name?
The puppy carries the kennel name of the breeder, which is usually the owner of the dam (who may or may not also own the sire). The sire and dam will carry the kennel names of THEIR breeder. If the pup's breeder also bred the sire or dam, the pup would carry the same kennel name. If the pup's breeder did not breed the sire or dam, pup and parents will have different kennel names.
 

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another thread to sticky? Great info
 

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Oh I love German!! So NOT confusing compared to English!!

I believe the von/vom is also a shortened "von den" (fem)/"von dem" (neut and masc)? In Dutch that would be "van den" or "van het" (my mom's maiden name is Van't Hof which is van het Hof). Gosh it's been sooo long! I was going to audit conversational German last semester just for this dog stuff but it didn't work out with my schedule.
 

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Quote:I believe the von/vom is also a shortened "von den" (fem)/"von dem" (neut and masc)?
"vom" is the shortened version of "von dem".

"von den" is used with plurals. For example, if your kennel name is Blaue Berge (blue mountains), it would be Ajax von den Blauen Bergen, since its plural. You can't use "vom" in that situation, though.

It's always "von den" for Plural since everything becomes feminine in the plural - die Maenner (the men), die Frauen (the women), die Hunde (the dogs) - even if the word in the singular is masculine or neuter.
 
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