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Cody is now 7 month and the center of our lives! He reached 70 pounds and has room to grow. I brought him to the vet to get him microshiped
with HomeAgain (would welcome feedback on HA and/or other options) and it didn't workout.

He was showing aggression toward the staff when they tried to restrain him so they called me and asked to help put a muzzle on him. Never tried that on him but now I know his limit! He was cornering the room avoiding me and did show that he was going to clearly bite if I were to proceed. So then the vet told me that he is afraid and does not trust them and potentially has fear/socialization issues. Suggestions was to consider fixing him now and do microship under sedative as well at a cost between $1, 160 low end and $1, 660 high end depending on exact (tbd) numbers of hours needed. ($80 is for microship, the rest goes toward the surgery cost -does this sounds right and is it covered by HP?)

Now, I d rather wait 1 y old to fix to give him chance to fully develop but he has shown difficulties being around other people/dogs so, in theory fixing him could mellow him down which might help with his behavior. He is going to training and his doing good but looking for advices on approach would work best.
 

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There’s no guarantee a neuter will fix his behaviour. Do you happen to have the ability to contact his breeder and ask about his parent’s disposition in those situations? If you do, it can help give you insight if this is a training issue or a genetic issue.

A good idea might be to ask your vet if you can do mini positive training sessions with him going there. You can start this at home by getting him accustomed to being touched all over and having his body moved around. Teaching him to allow his ears, paws, and mouth to be examined also help. I’m currently teaching my girl the “exam” command, where she has to lay on her side or back without moving. She knows “ears” and “mouth”, and it makes vet visits a breeze.

Once he’s comfortable being touched all over, then I’d start bringing him to the vet with the idea of positive reinforcement in mind. Go to the vet, get a high value treat. No appointment necessary. Just walk in, reward, calm and confident praise, reward for calm behaviour. Ask your vet about the possibility of training with them, and if it’s possible to bring him into an exam room. That way he can get used to being in there.

When Ryka was a pup, I brought loads of treats for every appointment. Any time the vet handled her, I was essentially free feeding her treats so it was all positive. She doesn’t love the vet office by any means, but she does adore the vet. And she’s a huugggeee drama queen, but allows them to poke and prod where necessary. Part of that is just self confidence, part of it is her looking at me knowing I’m not worried and that I’ve got all the goodies for when she’s on her best behaviour.
 

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That seems high for a neuter and micro chip. We only paid $40 for our Home Again chip with the 1st year full registration free from our vet. We didn't renew. The chip is still there and owner info is still available without the annual fee.

Neuters are general easier than a spay. We had a complicated spay, teeth cleaning, nail trim and micro chipping done for less than your quote.
 

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Put the muzzle on him and work on training ASAP! Not a good situation the dog is trying to bite you or the staff at the vet. Do a couple really short sessions each day working on handling your dog (touching/grabbing a foot or ear) in a calm manner and rewarding him! Start whatever your dogs comfortability is at & gradually work it up!
 

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Good God, $80 for a microchip?! What, like does it have tracking on it??? Lol. That's a little crazy. My dog's microchip costs $15. And neutering for more than $1k? That's just crazy. Usually it's $150-500 max. Behaviour-wise, the best thing to do with a fearful dog is to get a trainer who understand the situation. But first and foremost, you'll have to be able to earn his trust. A dog who respects and trusts its owner will allow the owner to touch any part of its body. I'd say get a trainer and try to learn what causes his anxiety and fear and take it from there, while he is still so young.
 

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I got maggie licensed, microchip, rabies 8$ for all. it was her 1st license so that was only free 1st time. most states or counties have programs via the spca. it was outside in a park. i took maggie to run the field 1st so she was very tired. it was done by staff not a vet in doc uniform..

can the vet do it in the parking lot? do u have a mobile vet who can come to your house?


pls let us know the outcome and process.... mags already gets mad at me and snaps and talks back when she doesnt want to do xyz...


maggie gets spayed the 20th why wait to alter if no intent on breeding? it will help calm him, but some animals just do not like the vet. my brother had a cat had to be last appt, wait til the place cleared out on top of valium....u know once they get excited so much the drug has 0 effect.
 

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My opinion - altering the pup can have the opposite effect of increased aggression on a fearful dog. Studies have been done showing this. I have a FA dog who proved this. Work on training before taking this step.

Begin now conditioning your pup to the use of a muzzle. Use a basket muzzle not the nylon muzzle they use at vet office - makes a world of difference. And simply because all dogs should be trained for a muzzle for that 'just in case' moment.

Reintroduce your pup to the vet office on the pup's terms. Take him to visit for scratches, pets, treats and leave. Caution the the staff to just ignore him, allow him to approach them, then calmly scratch side of head, side etc. Personally, I would find another vet. This vet appears to be taking advantage of the situation.
 

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My dog went to the vet when I had only had him for a week (rescue).
He growled at the tech and at the vet, ears flat.
They used a technique where they wrap a towel around his head/neck to do a quick (but not thorough exam).

He had improved a lot by his second visit (6 months later) but vet recommended that I still give him two trazodone pills about 1-2 hours before appointments.

I will muzzle train him, because I don't think he will ever be easy to handle by strangers...
my plan is to smear some peanut butter inside the muzzle, let him put his head in and lick it off, and when he's comfortable with that, attach the muzzle...and let him wear it around house a bit...repeat this until he's comfortable...
and then for the vet visit, my plan is to bring him to the vet, let him sniff around outside and put his muzzle on while we are still outside.
He won't be happy, but at least he won't be dangerous...

And yes, price sounds high!
The local shelters here seem to do microchip/neuter for really affordable prices.
But maybe it's your northern Cal location? Everything costs 5x as much there...
 

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Even with the location I feel like you should be able to find a place to neuter him for cheaper. I would get the microchip but I wouldn't neuter yet for the reasons others have given.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There’s no guarantee a neuter will fix his behaviour. Do you happen to have the ability to contact his breeder and ask about his parent’s disposition in those situations? If you do, it can help give you insight if this is a training issue or a genetic issue.

A good idea might be to ask your vet if you can do mini positive training sessions with him going there. You can start this at home by getting him accustomed to being touched all over and having his body moved around. Teaching him to allow his ears, paws, and mouth to be examined also help. I’m currently teaching my girl the “exam” command, where she has to lay on her side or back without moving. She knows “ears” and “mouth”, and it makes vet visits a breeze.

Once he’s comfortable being touched all over, then I’d start bringing him to the vet with the idea of positive reinforcement in mind. Go to the vet, get a high value treat. No appointment necessary. Just walk in, reward, calm and confident praise, reward for calm behaviour. Ask your vet about the possibility of training with them, and if it’s possible to bring him into an exam room. That way he can get used to being in there.

When Ryka was a pup, I brought loads of treats for every appointment. Any time the vet handled her, I was essentially free feeding her treats so it was all positive. She doesn’t love the vet office by any means, but she does adore the vet. And she’s a huugggeee drama queen, but allows them to poke and prod where necessary. Part of that is just self confidence, part of it is her looking at me knowing I’m not worried and that I’ve got all the goodies for when she’s on her best behaviour.

Thanks Femfa! I don't have access to his parent's history but he is comfortable with us touching him (we know he is not the cuddly type and respect that and his private space) and let us touch his food as well w/o complaining so he is a very good learner. Actually, this wasn't his first visit at this vet, he took his shots there before as well. Will keep in mind your approach once we made our decision to proceed.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks everyone for the awesome feedback! Cody has been in training for a month and 2 trainers recommended to proceed with the surgery as we don't intend to let him have offspring. Their reasoning was that it could help mellow him down a little but again no warranty and i agree with previous comments, if his behavior is due to the fact that he didn't gain enough "self-confidence"/maturity yet, neutering him at this point in time in his development won't probably help that.


I"m really conflicted about waiting cause i don't want to prevent him to fully develop into the magnificent companion he has already proved to be many times over. On the other hand, i understand that each dog is unique and what works for one might not on the other so trusting the judgement of both trainers+vet means some to me cause they can see/feel him interact with them and other and can observe hi m live.



I'll look into the cost as well, i was under the impression that those generic procedures should be cheaper as well, thanks for confirming that and would welcome recommendations to local vet that can be trusted by other parents on this forum!
 

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Thanks everyone for the awesome feedback! Cody has been in training for a month and 2 trainers recommended to proceed with the surgery as we don't intend to let him have offspring. Their reasoning was that it could help mellow him down a little but again no warranty and i agree with previous comments, if his behavior is due to the fact that he didn't gain enough "self-confidence"/maturity yet, neutering him at this point in time in his development won't probably help that.


I"m really conflicted about waiting cause i don't want to prevent him to fully develop into the magnificent companion he has already proved to be many times over. On the other hand, i understand that each dog is unique and what works for one might not on the other so trusting the judgement of both trainers+vet means some to me cause they can see/feel him interact with them and other and can observe hi m live.



I'll look into the cost as well, i was under the impression that those generic procedures should be cheaper as well, thanks for confirming that and would welcome recommendations to local vet that can be trusted by other parents on this forum!
A lot of the research on the effects of spaying and neutering is more recent. So a lot of people who don't stay up to date or are old school are going to keep their old opinions on it. There are also a lot of irresponsible owners which is a big reason spaying and neutering is pushed for at such a young age before they're able to breed. Even with the new research there are people I wouldn't tell to wait to spay/neuter simply because they aren't responsible enough or would decide to let their dog have puppies.

I also agree with others that sounds inordinately expensive for a neuter. I would work to find a low cost program or look into other vets and if you wait to neuter it gives you more time to look into it. In the meantime sounds like you have a good plan to work on muzzle training and other training. I wish you good luck with your pup!
 

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As well as the local animals shelters, some pet stores and places like Tractor Supply have vets that regularly come to their stores with mobile clinics to give shots and do microchips. Their prices are very reasonable and your dog might even be more comfortable in that type of situation instead of a vet's office.

You might also be able to find clinics that do only spaying and neutering, if you decide to go that route. Those are generally a lot less expensive than a local vet.

From what I have learned from reading the recent studies on spaying and neutering, like many here, I have chosen to keep my pets intact unless there is a serious medical reason for doing that surgery.
 

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Your vet is afraid of him and he knows it. The situation escalated. I had a similar issue with Deja. The vets were all about lovey-dovey treatment that works for most pet dogs and they suggested to sedate her for the titer blood draw but I decided to take her home instead. I had a talk with the vet and told her that all that sweet talk only riled Deja up. She is not so stupid as not to know that she will have to comply with something she doesn't want to. Deja is not afraid, just didn't want to put up with this. So it was agreed the next time I was going to handle her in a no-nonsense way from the time that I took her out of the car on a prong. No more treats and cooing; just making sure she cut the c**p. She never objected and was good since.
Forget about neutering to fix this; it won't. Find a non-nonsense vet.
 
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