German Shepherds Forum banner
21 - 32 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,893 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Originally Posted By: 4dognightI said I believed ...sorry I was wrong so any one could have a dog that helps them and be considered a service dog if they have a disability so to speak.? I find that amazing so that is probably how show dogs get passed off as service dogs and get to fly in cabin. So interesting. Just did not want a problem with her beautiful dog. So I have a question do you need to present to anyone in order to get paper work to have your dog go into stores etc. Or just a vest.? I am very curious I need to look at the service dog sites posted here. Thanks
"Disability so to speak?"
My dog is niether a show dog nor am I "trying" to pass her off as a fake SD. I have a special note from my physiatrist if people are questioning my service dog. And she does wear a vest that clearly states that she's a SD. And if you didn't read in my OP post, I clearly stated many of the commands she is trained to do.
She sleeps through anything and is very calm. One time I went to the theatre and wathced the Resident Evil 3 movie and I screamed in one of the parts and she slept through the whole thing. At restaurants, she sleeps under the table in tight ball under my feet. She's polite and does her job very well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,442 Posts
Missy, I don't think that post was directed at you, it was more of a general question about how someone could "get away with" passing a dog off with how the laws are written now.

The show dogs comment is in reference to another post in this section of the board, about dog show people who have been passing their show dogs off as service dogs so they could take them in the cabin during plane trips to shows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,271 Posts
Missy,

Looks like you have done a great job with Isa, and she does a great job for you, she is beautiful as well
Congrats!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
It is interesting that sdit are not allowed in the same places as SD's because I would think (I am thinking) that they would need the same exposure to be able to perform certain tasks. My therapy dog is often mistaken as a SD and folks won't approach him. I do have a therapy dog vest now (which he hates) but it has stopped parents from saying no you cannot see the doggie he is working
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,025 Posts
Quote: I would think (I am thinking) that they would need the same exposure to be able to perform certain tasks.
A dog does not need to have "Public Access" in order to learn its trained tasks. There are three basic steps in the training of a SD.
1) Obedience
2 & 3) Public Access & Tasks

When taking a dog out into the community (such as a shopping mall or other store) is not the time to train a task. You train the dog in a quiet area and then when it knows what you want in your home, in your yard, etc. then you begin what is known as proofing in places such as a parking lot or on a walk.

Unless your state acknowleges SDITs you can not take your dog anywhere that any pet dog is not allowed. Even with this people still manage to OT their dogs. A dog does not need to walk through a grocery store to keep it from sniffing at food. You work with it in your home, you take it to a friend's house, you have people help you out in the community.

Florida allows OT and also gives trainers of SDs public access rights to take a dog while training into any place that a SD is allowed to go. But you don't go to this level until the dog already knows his stuff
.

Before that, I like working in places like parking lots where we practice getting in and out of a car properly, standing nicely while equipment is being put on, walking nicely up to the sidewalk, and walking around people without requesting attention.

The last pup that I took we also had the opportunity to stop and listen to a young girl sitting on a stool in front of a store playing a saxaphone. We went to the fire station and checked out the equipment and firefighters. We went to a daytrip to a farm where the dog saw goats, horses, cows, pigs, rabbits, chickens, ducks, etc. This dog was then made to walk nicely by everything and to "leave it". Good proofing.

When training a SD at home, you spend many meals with the dog curled up under the table while you eat, you then visit a friend for lunch, and then work your way up eating somewhere outside. Walking into a restaurant is not the place to train a dog to go "under", to lay nice, and not to eat any food dropped on the floor.

By the time a SDIT does start going into priviledged places it should have perfect manners. If the dog acts up in the least little bit you must be ready to leave at that instant not 5 minutes later. You then go back and work on what the dog did incorrectly and proof it and make sure the problem is taken care of before you ever try again.

Many groups and organizations have tests to take before a dog starts with Public Access. The dog is tested on walking up and down stairs, walking across various surfaces, walking through and around traffic, coming when called off-leash, ignoring food dropped on the dog, staying in place while different types of distractions are going on, having strange people approach the dog and touch it, having a stranger approach the handler in a loud manner, and many other things that a dog will come across while out and about.

Before a dog goes out in the community under the handler's Public Access rights, it should have passed (or able to pass) a CGC and a temperament test such as the ATTS and this is in addition to the Public Access test that I had just spoke about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,893 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I didn't really think it was directed towards me, but I wasn't sure... We had Isa get her CGC before I started training her, around when she was a year. We also went through the test for SD to make sure she had good manners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
Thank you for the information. This is so interesting. I have done many of these things with my therapy dog ( he is not a GSD but a herding breed also) I have had some issues with him trying to finish breakfast ( especially scrambled eggs) if left in a residents lap when he is told to put his head in their lap so they can pet him. I use a leave it command but would like him just to ignore it. We are working on that so this info is useful to me. Because he is bred to herd we had a hard time getting him to focus on me when there were dozens of kids running all around but he does well at that now. I suppose there are many similarities in SD and TD. There is abuse in both areas We now have to have dates on our ID and wear the id badges at all times because folks were taking un registered dogs in to places claiming to be a TD but indeed were not. So that is why I wondered what ID etc was needed for a SD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,767 Posts
Generally, partners of therapy dogs are trained not to go into dining rooms or client's/resident's rooms when while meals are being eaten. If that training is followed, your therapy dog won't be able to eat anyone's eggs.



OP -
Isa is a gorgeous dog and you've done a great job training her. Skye would never had such good manners and attention at 3.

Thanks for the pictures of her working - I'm glad your hard work paid off and you have more independance now that you get out with Isa.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,025 Posts
Quote: Generally, partners of therapy dogs are trained not to go into dining rooms or client's/resident's rooms when while meals are being eaten.
I read it differently, more like maybe the person had breakfast and had dropped some eggs in their lap that had gone unnoticed before the dog came in. (Like maybe the person was in a wheelchair).

I know there were times when I would take Karl visiting and people had food hidden in their hands, in their pockets, or in some things they were carrying around with them.

Seems like there was always something to keep you on your toes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,767 Posts
TJ-

You are right. I went back and re-read the post. For some reason, I read it as a small dog that was on someone's lap. Now I see the dog's head was in the lap and food probably dropped earlier from breakfast.

My apology to the poster. Thank you for pointing that out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
Yes it is food from breakfast
We are not allowed in dining areas or when meals are being served. He is a 92 lb OES. Most of the time a leave it command is good but when he puts his head in someones lap and there are eggs etc it is just too good to miss. No apology needed. I need to work with him more he passed testing fine and does a wonderful job.

Isa is a beautiful dog and I have learned a lot from your posting. Good thoughts to you both. Thank you
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top