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Happened to come across this list of "dominant dog behaviors" and was surprised that Jupiter does many of them. Is it generally agreed that these are problematic behaviors?

Dominant Dogs

The ones he does are running through doors, trying to be taller than me (sometimes), running into me during play (he ran through me one time), holding bone against me while chewing, barking when it's lunch time and we're getting his food, jumping on me while I'm in a chair, mouthing me.
 

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Happened to come across this list of "dominant dog behaviors" and was surprised that Jupiter does many of them. Is it generally agreed that these are problematic behaviors?

Dominant Dogs

The ones he does are running through doors, trying to be taller than me (sometimes), running into me during play (he ran through me one time), holding bone against me while chewing, barking when it's lunch time and we're getting his food, jumping on me while I'm in a chair, mouthing me.
According to the article, my dog has some dominant behaviors off that list too.
 

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I don't know, I think you'd be hard pressed to find ANY young dog that wouldn't display several of the items listed. It seems to me that many of the things on that list are more learned or practiced behaviors, than they are indications of dominance. Does it really matter who eats first in the grand scheme of things?

My dog does - or did - many of these things as a puppy. The ones I didn't like were extinguished, but some I just like. Like barking or growling at me sometimes, whether playing or in protest. Like coming up and engaging me with a toy. Like biting me while playing. I'd miss them all if she quit!

But she's very bidable and focused, and by no stretch of the imagination a "dominant" dog! A truly dominant dog is a rare thing...
 

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Not dominant behavior. A behaviorist called a dog like this a "social climber". He is just being rude due to lack of structure and leadership. Time to reel in the boy.
 

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I don't know, I think you'd be hard pressed to find ANY young dog that wouldn't display several of the items listed. It seems to me that many of the things on that list are more learned or practiced behaviors, than they are indications of dominance. Does it really matter who eats first in the grand scheme of things?

My dog does - or did - many of these things as a puppy. The ones I didn't like were extinguished, but some I just like. Like barking or growling at me sometimes, whether playing or in protest. Like coming up and engaging me with a toy. Like biting me while playing. I'd miss them all if she quit!

But she's very bidable and focused, and by no stretch of the imagination a "dominant" dog! A truly dominant dog is a rare thing...
You like it when your dog bites you while playing?
 

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I think most of that list is just stupid. These are training issues. Dogs dont know any better until we teach them.

And, my two boys do or have done a LOT of that and I am absolutely certain neither is anything close to a dominant dog.

Dogs can be rude, pushy and obnoxious because they have not had boundaries, exercise training, whatever, and it does not make them dominant
 

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You like it when your dog bites you while playing?
I do, we play rough. But she also is very careful and doesn't hurt me or rip clothing. And she will stop immediately if I say stop. Doesn't everyone do that?

ETA: But to be more clear, I like that when it's appropriate, she doesn't bite or bite at me when we're playing fetch, for example. She doesn't attack me when I run (which at my age isn't often anyway)! She and I have a look that we give each other that means "game on"! We've refined and practiced it since she was a small puppy, and yes, I can't imagine having a dog and not play fighting with them...
 

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"Firm, not rough, body shoving. Physically forcing the dog to move away or out of your way. This can be done while paying no apparent attention to the dog. Or it may be done with eye contact and a threatening body posture if needed to make the dog move. Body shoving can be used when sitting down by the dog. Sitting partially on the dog if they are in a spot you want can be effective also."

This is dangerous advise.
 

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Pushing through doors, inside or outside, before you.

-----my dogs all go out doors before me unless they are told otherwise...

Jumping or reaching for food or treat before it is put down or in reach.

-----my lab does this but I did teach him to jump up to take treats, so I guess does not count as it is a trained behavior

Putting his or her feet on you, standing on or pawing at you.
-----both my boys but also a trained behavior and when I trained the on I also trained the off.

Barking at you when told to do something or when he or she wants something.
------my one is very vocal and we have whole conversations about stuff. Every once in a blue moon he will sass me. If he is legit out of line he might get me to tell him to knock it off and go settle down.

Trying to be physically taller than you.


Getting on furniture before you or before being given permission.
-----my dogs get on the furniture whenever they want

Reluctance to move from a spot you want to sit on, walk through or put something in.
---if they are comfortable I don't oust them from wherever, unless it's my spot in the bed and I'm coming to bed

Reluctance to release food or toys.
-----my girl is a snapping turtle with a toy....

Staring at you; prolonged eye contact except when you ask for it in a training or working situation.
------duh my shepherds stare at me all the time

Reluctance to obey simple, normal commands such as sit, go-out, get-off, etc. May be a refusal or slow compliance.

Marking (urinating or defecating) in house, marking your personal belongings or bed.
-----both my boys were totally housebroken prior to hitting "puberty" and getting obsessed with marking, at which time both had incidents of marking stuff they should not have, and I could see it was totally hormonal. Both got corrected for inappropriate marking and it stopped.

Running into you or jumping on you hard during play. This is a display of physical superiority and rights.
-------both my boys did this once...being stupid puppies who weren't paying attention. They both got a talking to for it because I ain't as young as I used to be. They got wild and had an accident, it was not about "rights"

Growling or barking at you during play.
-------ummm....

Sexual behaviors, such as mounting, with an inappropriate partner.
------any dog who tries to mount or hump me will suffer the consequences. Mine have never dreamed of it thank god

Putting her or his head on or over your head or shoulders.
------in the act of hugging or snuggling this happens.

Holding chews or toys against you while chewing or playing with toy.
-----mine brings it to me and asks me to hold it for him to chew and i do LOL

Any attempt to shove you out of the way when walking, sitting with, moving past or laying with you.

Mouthing you at any time, any placing of her or his mouth on you whether in protest, during play or during petting.
------I agree this is a no no.

Eating before you.
------they eat first a lot of the time...because I feed them first....because my husband isn't home yet so we can eat dinner and I can feed them and clean up before he gets home. I really don't think they read into it

Not accepting petting or touching on top of his or her head or body.
-----neither of my boys like straight on over head petting. Both will tolerate it but neither is a fan.

Getting playful or cute instead of obeying when told to do things. The dog may obey briefly and immediately resume previous behavior.
------yep this happens sometimes because I laugh. Can't say it's their fault and I shouldn't laugh

Guarding food, toys or locations that they see as theirs.
--No guarders here anymore.
 

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Shadow does most of those things, Bud did some, Lex did a few, call it bad manners, call it playing, call it whatever you like.
Most of my dogs smash into me on a recall, it's a by product of how I teach it. Sometimes I clean it up, sometimes they do. Sabi left bruises on my hip bones and stomach from slamming her front paws into me to stop on recall. She always barked at me on a down, just once. Bud near knocked me flat coming into heel. Lex always came up on her back legs for a quick kiss before sitting on the recall. Shadow slides into me like a reining horse.
Sabi used to wake me up by standing on my hair, washing my face and then yanking the blankets off me and pushing me off the bed. Lex liked to lay on top off me and rub her face against mine. Shadow stands on top of me and then does a somersault into my head. Lol.
Getting smacked in the head with a toy is just life in my world. It's an invite to play.
Bud marked everything, rotten beast, had nothing to do with dominance and everything to do with being a jerk. Training was successful while I was watching. Boys are gross.
Sabi preceded me through doors always. It was her job.
One of my favorite memories of Sabi was an argument over pizza bones that took place across the coffee table one night. I had just left my husband and had next to no furniture in my new house. I was sitting on the floor eating at the coffee table and a dispute arose over whether or not she needed to wait for the pizza bones. She barked and grumbled, I conversed and rationalized. It was awesome, still makes me chuckle.
Lots of people don't like dogs that act up or get out of line. I do. It has nothing at all to do with anything other then training. No dominance.
Shadow is always on the furniture and sleeps with me. She moves if I ask, sometimes just to roll over for belly tickles, she will happily surrender food and toys and she will hush and go to her bed when asked.
I think what the article should have said was that a dominant dog may sometimes use these behaviors.
 

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My dogs do some of these things on and off. Even my gal-dog who is not dominant at all. She shoves toys into me and I reward it (except it does get my pants dirty).

Both of my dogs know that I am "she who must be obeyed", the benevolent dictator! But if you watch dogs play, there is a give and take of power. One has the upper hand and then the other. That is how our household goes. Just like in play when my big-boy rolls onto his back to let my gal-dog nom-nom on his neck, he is giving her the illusion of power. I do the same. There are times on walks when my dogs might get so distracted I have to do something to break their focus, like walk them around in circles. That is when they get the speech "hey there, remember me? the one holding the other side of the leash?" If they are on furniture they have to get down and stay down. It took my boy awhile to learn that when he was a pup. They wait when I go out the door and they can't come. I make them stop at the top of outdoor stairs simply because I don't want to be pulled down them. Some rules are more safety than being the boss. Since I am the boss I expect them to comply. I eat when I want to, not before or after them. They can come up to me and remind me it is getting close to dinner time but know that I'll get up and fix it when I chose, not them. The dogs have some freedom and some power, life for them would be flat and suck otherwise. But they understand I decide when they eat, when they go outside to pee, where they sleep, when they get to come places with me, when we'll play games together outside, etc.

I do agree that stubborn dogs need more restrictions. They need to earn privileges. I also agree that it is better to add consequences as matter of fact as possible. Displaying anger has to be saved as a trump card if ever needed, for instance if a dog turns to chase another dog out into traffic kind of emergency.
 

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Yes, once you have earned the leader role it's OK to be flexible. I have seen that many times between dogs (pack mates) whose roles were clear. I love my relationship with Deja, she is not a robot and sometimes she is smarter in her decisions than I am and I can honor that without her taking advantage of it.
 

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I feel like a lot of these are lack of manners/training/respect than dominant behaviors. If you watch dogs they'll often avoid running into other dogs when playing or giving space. But I haven't noticed them naturally doing that with people. I've had to train my dogs that they can't do that as it's a good way for them to injure somebody, but I haven't noticed it as a dominant behavior.

Many dogs are just pushy and rude if they aren't properly trained. But it's more a lack of training than them trying to say oh I'm the big boss. In general of course.

Some of that stuff sounds more like somebody on a power trip.
 
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