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Good story on the negative impacts of processed food on dogs.

It also makes some good points that you could use as ammunition when having discussions with uninformed people about raw feeding. I was glad to see the article was clear to mention that many Veterinarians have no clue about this either.

‘You only need to look at David Attenborough programmes to know that wild dogs eat carcasses. They catch live animals or scavenge carrion; they don’t attack wheat fields, they don’t dig up potatoes, they don’t cook, they don’t add preservatives or flavour enhancers . . . if it doesn’t happen in the wild we shouldn’t be doing it for them.’

This quote makes it seem so simple and gave me a laugh. I can see our dogs digging but not for potatoes. Attacking a wheat field. :laugh:

Is pet food poisoning our dogs? | Mail Online
 

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This quote makes it seem so simple and gave me a laugh. I can see our dogs digging but not for potatoes. Attacking a wheat field.
Mine dig for leftover treats in the dog park...

They dig to roll themselves in something smelly

They dig in the cut grass and they fouler it is they more they eat it.
 

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I'm not against raw feeding but we feed TOTW kibble.
One important thing to keep in mind is, as much as the whole "wild dogs and wolves do this and that" argument in theory sounds pretty nice, that is, indeed, a very romantic idea. Dogs have been by human's side for waaaaay too long and their metabolism adapted in such a way (becoming omnivores) that almost all of the crucial biochemistry studies that established the biochemical metabolic pathways we know today were done in...dogs! That's how close they are from humans, metabolically speaking. Feed raw if you wish, but there is nothing wrong with good quality kibble.
Cheers,
Ana
 

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My female, Kiya, was diagnosed in November 2005 with idiopatic epilepsy. I was absolutely devastated, she was only about 18 months old. I had no clue dogs could get epilepsy. We are "blessed" and I'll say that because she has great control with meds. I went out of my mind trying to figure out why. Then began no chemicals on the lawn, no chemicals to clean the house, no fabric softners, it went on & on. If she got worse one of the first things I was going to do was change food. I certainly believe the horror stories about commercial food. I have just swiched to a 3 star kibble. I would like to switch to raw, but feeding 3 dogs and a full time job, kibble is easier. It's not that I dont love my dogs, I love them more than life itself.
I know they have prepared raw diets available, but I've been told you have to watch out for that too. My husband gets mad at me for giving them raw marrow bones, he'd flip seeing raw chicken on the floor.
 

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I've fed raw to 4 dogs(one senior, one pup weaned onto raw) for over 3 years and have not had any problems.
I use the same precautions as I do for my own food prep.

Dogs have enzymes that break down bacteria, salmonella etc. I don't have raw chicken on my floor, it is either in the dogs mouth or they are outside eating the larger RMB's.
I still feel raw is safer than kibble, at least I can control all the extra's they put into it.
Though much of the meat I feed is not from organic sources so I have some fear of the mass produced grocery store meat and what it may contain.
 

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I recently started researching dog foods, it took me a long time and a love of readying, i think i found one that i have not had anyone say was bad for the dogs besides high in protein but my pups are active, i feed them blue buffalo wilderness. does anyone have any input on this brand?
 

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‘You only need to look at David Attenborough programmes to know that wild dogs eat carcasses. They catch live animals or scavenge carrion; they don’t attack wheat fields, they don’t dig up potatoes, they don’t cook, they don’t add preservatives or flavour enhancers . . . if it doesn’t happen in the wild we shouldn’t be doing it for them.’
Mine steals tomatoes, blueberries, peppers and potatoes...sorry folks...they do eat fruits and veges. :)

ohhh...and apples...out of my lap.
 

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I recently started researching dog foods, it took me a long time and a love of readying, i think i found one that i have not had anyone say was bad for the dogs besides high in protein but my pups are active, i feed them blue buffalo wilderness. does anyone have any input on this brand?
Its a good food but I would not feed it to a growing pup. Calcium levels are too high. http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/feeding-our-puppy/141757-7-months-young-wilderness.html
 

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My dogs love fruits and veggies too,lol They get 3-4 cups of Orijen a day and a cup of home cooked rice or pasta, a protein , and fruits and veggies mixed in with their evening meal. I'll also bake and puree sweet potatoes on occasion and they are a huge hit here. Dogs are not strict carnivores, they are not wolves, and unless your feeding Ol'Roy you are probably not killing your dog:)
 

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Blue Buffalo...yes, I have used it and it took forever to get the Wilderness. I like it a lot, and so do the dogs.

What I have found over the years and through all my dogs (I have 8 GSDs) is that some do just fine on quality kibbles (I was floored to find out that P&G bought out Natura and I will no longer feed that), and others need a cooked meal and others do best on raw. Dogs are individuals and its important that we do what works best for our particular dogs. There are parameters, however that I do try to stand by.

The first is that any kibble I consider must not have corn, by-products, grains if possible, no ethoxyquin, BHA, BHT, salt, and I want a protein content of more than 40% if possible. I want to see a whole meat as the first ingredient.

In raw foods, I do try to buy one that is analyzed. I had a horrible disaster when I did a raw diet that I put together with one of my puppies and it did not include enough calcium. I will NEVER do that again.

But, I do have dogs that do so much better on raw. And I have one that is currently on cooked for a specific health issue. For my group, if I could afford raw for 8 GSDs, I would do it. But, it is just out of my reality to do so. I do see fewer health problems with my dogs on raw.

The point being is that there is no "right" way that is going to fit every dog out there. Just like in dog training. There are a multitude of ways to train AND to feed your dog. The trick is to do what works best for your dogs and for YOU. Do what you feel good about, do what you can afford and do what your dog is healthy on.

I have been through the epileptic dog, too and she did SO much better on a homemade cooked meal. She did not do well on raw. But, kibble definitely increased her seizures, so did lawn sprays, and household toxins.

I have dogs with IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease) that I could control on a raw diet. I have had dogs with cancer that had amazing results in fighting the cancer spreading feeding raw/cancer starving diets. I have one dog that had kidney disease that should have died 5 years ago because of a malpractice and he is on raw and STILL doing well! I have one that was a parvo puppy and had a spinal embolism and has been raw fed about half of her life and is now 12. No one thought she would live this long. I have seen allergies disappear on a balanced raw diet. But, I have also had one dog that did not do well on raw and her food had to be cooked. Dogs with pancreatisits that after being switched to raw never had pancreatitis again. Dogs with chronic sloppy stools no matter what kibble I fed, then raw cleared it up. You name it. Raw seemed to help.

So, yes, I believe in raw, but again, it doesn't work for every dog or is in everybody's budget. And another option is to feed raw a couple days a week or even once a week. My dogs have gone from raw to kibble without any problem even from day to day.
 

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While what food works best for the appropriate situation, don't forget that exercise and mental stimulation and just being part of the pack (belonging) is part of the equation too. We can feed to the extreme right or to the extreme left and maybe in the middle, but if we leave out the rest our dogs are not getting all they need to thrive as happy members of our families.
 

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I recently read somewhere that dogs have no physiologic need for carbohydrates.

If that is true, then though they can eat them, it would appear they don't require them?
 

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I recently read somewhere that dogs have no physiologic need for carbohydrates.

If that is true, then though they can eat them, it would appear they don't require them?
It is really glucose that is required.

According to the Waltham Book of Dog and Cat Nutrition, 1988 "There is no known minimum dietary carbohydrate requirement for either the dog or the cat. Based on investigations in the dog and with other species it is likely that dogs and cats can be maintained without carbohydrates if the diet supplies enough fat or protein from which the metabolic requirement for glucose is derived." Keywords are minimum and no known.

That is why many dry food diets are very concerned with using appropriate carb sources (you will need them for kibble) to keep glucose levels in check. While not popular in many circles, field corn used in dog food is the lowest in sugar and doesn't promote the spike in glucose levels when balanced of course with the rest of the diet.

As long as a dog obtains the appropriate amount of glucose from the raw diet, then the dog needs no other glucose sources.

So while field corn may be considered a filler by some, it does provide an energy source and oils for the dogs skin and coat. It is not just a filler. Might not be the most expensive compared to a meat source, but it does play a role, like rice, potatoes, peas, pea fiber, etc.... and corn gluten meal can be used as a plant based form of protein to complement the meat in the diet. Corn and Corn meal does provide some protein but not as much as meat or Corn Gluten Meal. As an FYI - Corn Gluten Meal (not the same as corn or corn meal) is normally used to help reduce ash levels in some cat food to help with Urinary Tract Health and according to a Canadian study - cats digested Corn Gluten Meal just fine - they saw it as a protein.
 
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