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Less than 48 hours ago I lost my girl Cedar. Cedar was an amazing girl, but she was a challenging dog. My boy Titan is also challenging, but in different ways. Don't get me wrong, they are both very well behaved compared to the average dog, they just have their challenges.

Before GSD's, I had huskies. They were such difficult dogs and so difficult to train I would never recommend huskies to the average person.

As my dogs got older (Titan is now 8.5) I started to say to myself that I might go a while without dogs once the unthinkable happened. I've basically always had dogs and always had working dogs. I just felt like it might be a nice break to be dog free for maybe a couple years.

Now that I've lost my girl Cedar, I feel like there's a huge hole in my life. I miss Cedar so much. Almost immediately after the fact I started getting the urge to get another dog. I'm just worried I'm getting a dog for the wrong reasons, although if I get a dog, it's for life. Even if I don't get it for the right reasons, that dog will be loved, will be trained and will be cared for.

Anyone else get these urges while in the same boat I'm in? Anyone else get another dog very shortly after losing one?
 

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Shaner.

Guilty here. I’ve put down four in almost thirty years of owning GSD’s and have had a replacement, usually within 60 days. That’s an arbitrary time frame, but I like having multiple Shepherds. Period.

The greatest compliment, I believe, is being so impressed with this breed allows me to want to continue on with it.

Recognize, the new pup will not be a substitute for Cedar, but a replacement. A new chapter. It’ll be different with different highs and lows. Different. Never compare, though, right? Comparison is the enemy of joy.

I’ve never worried about “time to grieve” and all those colloquialisms, labels, definitions, etc. Definitions are for the definers, not the defined.

I internalize the grief, sure, but I don’t quantify the grief.

You do what’s good for you, but if you really want another GSD, go get one. Don’t let the fear in your mind, extinguish the fire in your heart.

I wish you the best of luck in whatever choice you make.
 

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I have went through the same thought process several times. Lost my Basset Hound 8 years ago to cancer and within 2 weeks we got a Cocker Spaniel. Lost out Australian Cattle dog 3 months ago and had my GSD picked out within 2 weeks and had him within 5 weeks.
 

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Only you can answer this question of when you are ready in your heart. Everyone grieves differently. We've always had multiple dogs and some considerations for us were tge more practical spacing and life events. Storm is 8, Harley is almost 4 and we will get a new pup this summer. I like spacing them so in theory they can all play with each other and I will always have a dog in the house. I'm not a big fan of bringing in a wild puppy when your geriatric dog just wants to relax and enjoy their time. I also considered upcoming life changes such as having kids or moving and having to find a rental for a temporary military move. Easier for 1-2 dogs versus 3. Is now a good economic time for you with everything going on? When we reopen, do you have a job that will demand more time and make it harder or are you retired and it doesn't matter if you go the puppy route? I have a friend who's an intensive care doctor. She was planning on getting a puppy this summer for her family. She's now looking with her husband at rescue dogs 2+ years. As mentioned in other threads, some breeders have pups on the ground or coming and others are holding off. Are there possible breeders you want your next dog from? When will they have pups? Many people are also adding dogs now that they are home, but what will happen in 6 months? Shelters may become full with returns or relinquished pets due to families making tough economic choices. That may be a good time if you want to rescue.

Your heart and your head will let you know when the time is right. Plus Titan may just pick out his sister too!
 

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There is no ideal time. Everyone grieves in his own way. As long as you know what you are getting and not getting the first dog from Craigslist, although a neighbor ended up with a great dog like that. My breeder had a litter soon after my WD died and since I knew his dogs and loved everything about them, I had a new pup soon after.
 

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Your post struck me because we lost our all time best dog to hemangio in October. We got an early diagnosis, so she went about 5 1/2 months on chemo with mostly pretty good quality of life, sometimes very good. But we knew sooner or later, the end was coming. So when she passed, we got a new puppy within a month. For us, it was the only thing that helped. I am 56, and maybe as a younger person I would have gone longer. But loss has made me conscious of shortness of time in general.
As you surely know and other posters have said, there is no replacing or substituting for the friend you lost. The girl we lost was a rescue, and made a great companion, as I say, our best dog ever, so that might be an option if you are not up for trials of puppyhood right now.
 

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That's really something only you can answer. All our dogs are shelter dogs so we look until we find one that fits our needs. We depend on them for security so we usually start looking fairly soon. We've also had a male that grieved something awful until we found him a new girl hastening our decision to look. And when we lost Buck in September, Elke went out and sat at the top of driveway waiting for him to come back every day. However it took 4 months to find a young, large, male that was suitable disposition wise. We had no problem finding females, vicious ones, small ones and ones that didn't like Elke. Duke is not the brightest crayon in the box, but he definitely is the sweetest.
 

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As long as you don’t rush into a mistake, you should get another dog when you are ready. be sure of what you want and don’t settle for anything other than the dog, temperament, age, etc that you want. Don’t just grab another puppy because it’s available right now.
 

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My second last dog was almost 14 and wasn't going to enjoy the cold of another Winter so we had the time to plan to put her down before she suffered. We prepared the kids and my vet came to the house and I buried her in the woods out back and still walk by her every morning. I have never gone more than a few weeks between dogs over 40 years; a home without a dog is just a house...

It may seem weird but I had already bought a new pup and brought him home the same day and he's now almost 6. There's no time to be sad when you have a new 8 week old looking up at you and needs you. It worked for us.
 

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Honestly I’d say wait, but it’s your life. If you are ready and can give the puppy your full attention go for it
 

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I knew when I lost my very special female GSD, that I'd eventually want another. I waited a little while til I found myself shopping the rescues online.
Then one day our county shelter advertised a plain jane GSD puppy online. I went to see him but he was gone before
I got there.
Out of about 200 pit mixes, they had one bedraggled, underweight, just had puppies weaned, GSD (mix ??) female.
Sweet, while in her pod, but wild and crazy when we brought her out. Dumb and uneducated but she really needed
an upgrade in her life. She was due for some good things to happen to her.
Took her home with me and I swear this dog had lived in a closet. Knew nothing of the outside world, knew no commands, unmannered and dog reactive, but boy was she a sweetie with people.
I have a farm and I decided her job would be to protect the farm animals and property. Well Heidi immediately took
her job seriously and each morning she would run all the fences and even tried to herd the horses into their feeding shelters. I stopped that immediately for safety reasons. But she has overcome her reactivity to most other dogs,
my house/barn cats, the horses and has just become the nicest girl.
She was an anxious dog initially and took a while to settle in and be comfortable. But it was fun teaching her so much.

My adult son had 2 large husky/gsd mixes who were getting elderly and infirm so he started coming once or twice a week to take Heidi on fun doggy outings or her "Disney World trips" as he calls them. She loved the florida beach,
many hiking trails, going to 4-5 different Dog Parks, walking the towns around here and the stores that allow dogs.
To say this wallflower dog has gotten an education is an understatement.

So my advice would be to get your next girl as soon as you want. It's the only way to fill that hole. And I'm sure Cedar
would want you to be happy and she would want another lucky dog to have as great a life as she had. Go for it!!
 
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