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So my dog bhaaloo is about 28.5’’ to 29” (last time I checked him he was 28” and 9 months)and I just weighed him today and he came in at 93lbs. He actually just turned 1 year and 7 months old today! I know the average is suppose to be 88lbs but he is also a couple inches taller than the average so just wanted to see what you guys thought.
 

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I don't think it matters how tall and how much it weighs. You're not showing the dog. As long as your dog's not overweight, you're fine. Also, my opinion...underweight is better than overweight....less stress on the joints.
 

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so my dog bhaaloo is about 28.5’’ to 29” (last time i checked him he was 28” and 9 months)and i just weighed him today and he came in at 93lbs. He actually just turned 1 year and 7 months old today! I know the average is suppose to be 88lbs but he is also a couple inches taller than the average so just wanted to see what you guys thought.
no !!!!!
 

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Hard to say from these pictures. You need one directly looking at his side and then looking directly down on top of him taken from the back.

If he's truly that tall, then I doubt he is but you can post better pictures for people to look at.
 

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I don't think it matters how tall and how much it weighs. You're not showing the dog. As long as your dog's not overweight, you're fine. Also, my opinion...underweight is better than overweight....less stress on the joints.
Underweight has health issues associated with it because it means the dog is not getting the nutrients it gets to live a healthy life. Saying it's better because there is no stress on the joints is ridiculous because it is stress on every system in the body. Muscle, organs, brain function. Same as being overweight can affect function. Honestly I'd rather my dog be a tad overweight (not obese) than under. At least it means she has body stores in the case of an illness. And as seen in nature a tad overweight seems more favored than under. But ideally you keep your dog at a good level for it neither under or over weight.

To the OP averages are just that, averages. Individual dog and it's body structure will make things different. I agree with others that you need different angled pictures to get an actual idea.
 

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Underweight has health issues associated with it because it means the dog is not getting the nutrients it gets to live a healthy life. Saying it's better because there is no stress on the joints is ridiculous because it is stress on every system in the body. Muscle, organs, brain function. Same as being overweight can affect function. Honestly I'd rather my dog be a tad overweight (not obese) than under. At least it means she has body stores in the case of an illness. And as seen in nature a tad overweight seems more favored than under. But ideally you keep your dog at a good level for it neither under or over weight.

To the OP averages are just that, averages. Individual dog and it's body structure will make things different. I agree with others that you need different angled pictures to get an actual idea.
That's great. That's why we have these forums. People state their own opinions...even if they're "ridiculous" as you put it...and then decisions are made based on the different opinions. I'd rather my dog be a tad underweight than a tad overweight. We're not talking about a starving dog with ribs and bones showing. We're looking at pictures that the OP provided and to make a judgement on them. And, I can go on and on about the problems of an overweight dog but I'm sure I won't change your mind about it since my opinion is ridiculous.
 

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My dog doesn’t hunt for his dinner, it’s always there on time, sometimes even before he’s truly hungry. I don’t think he needs extra fat stores any more than I do. Like people, dogs can be overweight and undernourished. Extra fat doesn’t mean the dog is getting all the nutrients required, only that an excess of energy is being consumed.

And apparently dogs can be underfed (by accepted standards), underweight (by accepted standards) and still be well-nourished. This question has been studied over the years - quick and dirty search found the 2 citations below, among a few others. Seems in these groups *slightly* ‘underfed’ skinny dogs lived longer than their ‘normally’ fed counterparts, as long as nutritional needs were met. And their quality of life was better in their senior years.

https://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/abs/10.2460/javma.2002.220.1315

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/17411081
 

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Underweight has health issues associated with it because it means the dog is not getting the nutrients it gets to live a healthy life. Saying it's better because there is no stress on the joints is ridiculous because it is stress on every system in the body. Muscle, organs, brain function. Same as being overweight can affect function. Honestly I'd rather my dog be a tad overweight (not obese) than under. At least it means she has body stores in the case of an illness. And as seen in nature a tad overweight seems more favored than under. But ideally you keep your dog at a good level for it neither under or over weight.

To the OP averages are just that, averages. Individual dog and it's body structure will make things different. I agree with others that you need different angled pictures to get an actual idea.

The only animals who's bodies are designed to handle excess weight are those who hibernate or deep sleep through parts of the year, which no members of the canine family do. Most predators have evolved with systems equipped to handle a gorge and fast system. Many domestic dogs still exhibit this behavior and it is the root cause of many supposed picky eaters. Grazing animals in some climates may store a bit of fat in anticipation of lack of food, but it is not a great deal, imagine a fat gazelle trying to escape anything. Predators don't practice this since excess weight would be a hindrance, picture a fat coyote running after a rabbit. A dog would have to be thin to the point of emaciation for a prolonged period to have negative consequences from being underweight, whereas excess fat quickly plays havoc on organs and joints. I am not opposed to a bit of pudge on a pup, but it is much harder to get weight off a dog then put it on.
 

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88 pounds is not average for a male shepherd, it's actually the top of the breed standard, which goes from approximately 66 pounds to approximately 88 pounds (30-40 kgs). I don't know how you'd even calculate an average size or weight.

That being said, many shepherds are larger than the breed standard, and a dog with a bigger frame can weigh more and still be an appropriate weight for his size, which is already several inches taller than the standard.

Most of the time when people ask if their dog is overweight or underweight (both of which are VERY common questions here) what they really seem to be asking is if their dog is big or small, which is not the same thing. A smaller dog can be overweight and a larger dog can be underweight. If he's a good weight, there should be a discernible "waist" when looking down on him from above and a tuck up at the abdomen when viewed from the side. When you run your hand down his side, you should easily feel his ribs but they should not protrude. Without photos showing those angles, it's impossible for us to tell.
 

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Speaking of height/weight ration, the standard height for males are 24-26". Logically speaking if we talk standards, the 26" dogs are those who hit the heaviest weight (88lb.) Therefore if your dog is taller than the standards, then some extra pounds are not a problem. 5 pounds heavier, with a 2,5" dog, don't think it would classify as 'overweight.' Which means your dog is most likely absolutely fine.
 

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Side view and a view with him standing and you above looking directly down on him. Want to see the break where his ribs end.



 

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Can't see the GSD well to notice body weight. The little guy, though, seems a bit too heavy; can't see the hourglass shape from above. Healthy weight is just as important for the small dogs as well.
 

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Here’s a quick example of my girl. She’s 26” and about 73lbs, give or take. These are the kind of angles we need to assess weight - I would say my dog is lean, though needs more muscle, which will come with age.

Top shot:



Natural but awful stack (side view):



And I find with lean, but healthy GSDs, it’s pretty easy to see their last few ribs, especially when active:



Otherwise, to us, your dog could just be an overweight pink unicorn slug if we don’t see the right angles.

 

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A structurally sound dog will have no joint issues from a couple of pounds.
I'm not sure who said only animals that hibernate get overweight, but that's wrong.
Wild animals weight fluctuates with the weather, season, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all the info guys, I really appreciate it! So I took a couple more pics so I hope these help. Also I did a dna test on him and I have the results. So apparently he is not full German Shepherd which may explain the bigger size.
 

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He's all GSD, don't worry about the DNA.

His weight does look good, you may want to muscle him up a bit :) but he looks great otherwise! :)
 
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Awesome! That’s great to hear! Any recommendations on exercises to muscle him up? We have been just doing been doing walks and short runs. He also wrestles with his older brother (chihuahua/corgi) quite a bit. Also he’s limited to catch to just one day a week when I take them to my parent’s house since my backyard is not exactly big enough to play.
 
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