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I will be picking up the newest GSD addition to my family in the following month from Von Datschiburg, a breeder in Port Colborn kennels, out of Ivo x Inca. High drive, intelligent pups are to be expected.

I intend to do Shutzhund/IPO with the possibility of Agility competitions if time allows me to do both. This will be my first dog that I will title and compete with, and I am extremely excited and cannot wait to dedicate some serious effort. With my previous Shepherd, whom I did not compete with - she knew a LOT of tricks. I also trained her when she hit 5 years old to scent for marijuana in the house or on guests for a kick... I just have a passion to train and I am able to do it easily in old and young dogs.

Is it possible to train a dog to do too much? I would also like to train my future pup in scent detection (most likely a drug), not to sell as a detection dog or anything, just for the heck. Schutzhund, agility and scent detection - is this all too much?:help:
 

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I think it depends on the dog. In my view, no matter how good the trainer, the dog still needs ability and drive to do the task. So, congrats on your pup, and I suggest you start slow and see where you pup's natural abilities are and build on that.
 

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Train consistently and be fair, whatever you do. I train almost every day, but give my dog a day or two off.
A young puppy will have 'burps' so don't push or get discouraged, but enjoy the puppyhood.
I wouldn't put pressure early on either, it will eventually backfire. Set a nice strong foundation in whatever venues you decide to train in. And I would not do it all at once but build upon your goals. Nosework is great, but if you are doing IPO tracking, you need to decide how your dog will indicate in a scent discrimination class. Too much obedience early on can inhibit a pup in the protection phase. So decide what you want to do first... and build from there. Get with a good club first and foremost!!
The team bond is most important. If it isn't enjoyable for your puppy, you'll get frustrated and that won't bode well.
 

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Is it possible to train a dog to do too much?
I don't think so.

It's possible to oversaturate a dog in any single training session, sure. And if you want to progress to titling/competing with your dog, you may find that it gets pretty expensive and time-consuming to be active in multiple sports at once. And there are some sports/skills that tend to be a little incompatible with others -- you can eventually train past most such issues, but you do need to be patient, realistic, and clear in your communications... and it helps a LOT if you have a smart dog. It takes a pretty special team to hit the top in multiple sports.

But if you and your dog have it in you to get an OTCH/MACH/ARCHMX/SchH3 combination, hey, go for it.
 

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Yes I realize during the 'puppyhood' things cannot be done too quickly, or too forcefully. The main thing I will focus on is just properly socializing the little guy and making sure he isn't afraid of anything. Right now I'm just looking in to the best trainers in my area, sucks because in the Mississauga/Brampton area there are nearly none.

Has anyone trained dogs in multiple disciplines? IPO will be the first thing that I will start working on, any advice is helpful.
 

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Has anyone trained dogs in multiple disciplines?
Yep, lots of people. At my club, training in a single sport is very much the exception, not the rule. :)

It's hard to give advice before you get started, though. My only suggestion at this point is to find a good sport fundamentals class and enroll in that (if there's nothing in your area, enroll online. Home - agility-u.com and Fenzi Dog Sports Academy - Home are two good options, and Fenzi Dog Sports has a Performance Puppy class starting in August). Find a good puppy socialization class and enroll in that, too. Pick up a copy of Leslie McDevitt's Control Unleashed: The Puppy Program and read it.
 
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