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Discussion Starter #21
It can correct to some extent because it usually comes from the shoulders. My girl is easty-westy and it is her conformation in her shoulders, verified by a PT. The shoulders pull the elbows in and push the feet out. I would not count on it correcting itself. There are exercises you can do to help it and loosen the shoulders with stretching exercises and you can help the pasterns with targeting exercises as well.

I've heard that when the dog's chest deepens in maturity, it will correct to some extent. Mild cases appear to correct to 100%.

It is considered a fault by the SV. it is not disqualifying. My girl has a G rating in her young dog class.

Throwing a dog out of a breeding program for a fault that does not affect health, working ability or temperament is not intelligent breeding. Is it a desirable trait? No. But I wouldn't throw the dog out because of it if the dog was bringing other traits.

As far as showing - if you have a WGSL, they won't do well in an AKC ring. An ASL won't do well in an SV ring. You might try UKC. that seems to be a fairer, less biased, circuit.

Thank you for this info! Very helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
No one has asked why the OP wants to breed in the first place, even if his dog was without fault.

"He just turned 6 months and weighs 70 lbs."

He's going to be a big boy too.
I’ve always been in love with the breed. I want to be dedicated and research as much as possible before doing so. I’ve heard not breeding a dog with bad hips/elbows (makes sense) but never heard of not breeding because the feet aren’t 100% straight. I still have a ways to go if I decide to after he’s cleared with his health tests. Yes, he’s a big boned boy.
 
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