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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve noticed my boy is easty westy and it looks pretty dramatic to me. His pasterns aren’t really weak but his two from feet point outwards when sitting and standing. Flat footed I would say... my question is will it correct itself as he grows? He just turned 6 months and weighs 70 lbs.
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i have not seen east-west front feet “correct” themselves.
 

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I'm a chicken with this kind of stuff. Take him to a vet and even do x-rays, just to make sure. But as long as he's not in distress, then not sure what can be done.

By the way, purdy puppy.
 

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I agree with Fodder. That looks like his conformation and I doubt it will change. He seems to turn out from the pastern, not the entire leg, so I think that's the way he will be. If the whole leg turned out and his legs were straight to the ground, it might get better as his chest widens with age, but that doesn't seem to be the case here. There is a noticeable bend at the pasterns. That won't straighten, in my opinion.

And, as Cadfael stated, take him to the vet and get a professional opinion.
 

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I agree with Fodder. That looks like his conformation and I doubt it will change. He seems to turn out from the pastern, not the entire leg, so I think that's the way he will be. If the whole leg turned out and his legs were straight to the ground, it might get better as his chest widens with age, but that doesn't seem to be the case here. There is a noticeable bend at the pasterns. That won't straighten, in my opinion.

And, as Cadfael stated, take him to the vet and get a professional opinion.
So is this something that shouldn’t be bred? I do plan on getting him health tested for hips and elbows. I’ve just seen well bred dogs have easty westy feet before so I’m not sure if it’s genetic. His parents feet were not like that.
 

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Personally, I would not breed that dog. That looks like a genetic issue to me.

I'm not a breeder. Hopefully one of the breeders here will chime in and give their opinion. But why breed a dog with a known conformation problem? That's just asking for trouble in my book.

Also, are you planning to title your dog in some field? He should have to prove he is worthy of producing offspring by his performance.
 

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Personally, I would not breed that dog. That looks like a genetic issue to me.

I'm not a breeder. Hopefully one of the breeders here will chime in and give their opinion. But why breed a dog with a known conformation problem? That's just asking for trouble in my book.

Also, are you planning to title your dog in some field? He should have to prove he is worthy of producing offspring by his performance.
He can’t be shown considering long coat is a fault... his parents didn’t have feet like that so I’m not sure how it’s genetic. I love the breed and his temperament is great. Supposedly his easty westy feet are pretty common from what I’ve seen on here with other puppies and adult dogs, even with dogs that are titled and bred.
 

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There are plenty of ways to title a dog other than showing. You really need to do a lot more research about these dogs before you consider breeding. And you need to learn about genetics. Just because the parents don't have a trait that your dog has, doesn't mean that he didn't inherit it from a grandparent, or great grandparent, or even farther back.

I'm not trying to be harsh here, just being truthful.

Think of it this way. If you had a really nice female and were looking for a stud for her, would you choose a dog with legs like your dog's, or a dog with straight legs to breed to?

Why is your dog better to breed to than the hundreds of thousands of other male GSD's out there? What is the point in breeding less than the best in conformation, temperament, and proven ability?

I love my dog. He's perfect to me and he has not been neutered. Would I breed him? Never. He's not of that quality even though I find no fault with him at all. He's just not breed worthy in my opinion and he isn't titled. He will do nothing to improve the breed. He's exceptional to me, but he's not a breeding dog.

I'm sure your pup is a wonderful dog and that you are happy to have him, as you should be. Enjoy him, train him, find a sport that he and you can excel in, get his health testing done for diseases and x-rays. You have years yet to see if his legs will improve. In my opinion, they are what you see.

Take him to your vet and ask him. Get his professional opinion. Talk to breeders and see what they think. Study, study and study some more and find a breeder who will mentor you. Breeding is not something you should pursue on your own.
 

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Just because you love your dog, doesn't mean he needs to be bred. I would never chose a stud with a confirmation flaw like that. It will not improve the breed, quite the opposite. Also, he could have inherited this problem from generations down. Take him to an orthopedic vet so you know what's going on. Please do not breed him. He is a fun looking perky pup though. Just enjoy him as your dog. By the way if you forgo of breeding, he doesn't need to be neutered as long as you don't give him the opportunity. Or you could decide for a vasectomy to leave him intact without being fertile.
 

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I’ve heard they do and it tends to be an awkward puppy thing.
well, a couple of things...
if you’ve heard that it corrects itself and is just a part of the awkward puppy phase, then what’s your question / concern?
again, if it corrects itself, then what’s to be said for these well bred titled adult dogs you’ve seen?
lastly, long coats can be shown...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
well, a couple of things...
if you’ve heard that it corrects itself and is just a part of the awkward puppy phase, then what’s your question / concern?
again, if it corrects itself, then what’s to be said for these well bred titled adult dogs you’ve seen?
lastly, long coats can be shown...
From what I’ve heard they can’t be shown in AKC
 

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Fodder is saying that there are other places to show and compete with your dog. Do your research and find out what is available. AKC is not the only option by any means.
 

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Just because you love your dog, doesn't mean he needs to be bred. I would never chose a stud with a confirmation flaw like that. It will not improve the breed, quite the opposite. Also, he could have inherited this problem from generations down. Take him to an orthopedic vet so you know what's going on. Please do not breed him. He is a fun looking perky pup though. Just enjoy him as your dog. By the way if you forgo of breeding, he doesn't need to be neutered as long as you don't give him the opportunity. Or you could decide for a vasectomy to leave him intact without being fertile.
Fodder is saying that there are other places to show and compete with your dog. Do your research and find out what is available. AKC is not the only option by any means.
I know that but if I were to ever show a dog I would want it to obviously be in AKC.
 

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trends, faults and disqualifications are not the same. do what you’d like with that info.
 
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It can correct to some extent because it usually comes from the shoulders. My girl is easty-westy and it is her conformation in her shoulders, verified by a PT. The shoulders pull the elbows in and push the feet out. I would not count on it correcting itself. There are exercises you can do to help it and loosen the shoulders with stretching exercises and you can help the pasterns with targeting exercises as well.

I've heard that when the dog's chest deepens in maturity, it will correct to some extent. Mild cases appear to correct to 100%.

It is considered a fault by the SV. it is not disqualifying. My girl has a G rating in her young dog class.

Throwing a dog out of a breeding program for a fault that does not affect health, working ability or temperament is not intelligent breeding. Is it a desirable trait? No. But I wouldn't throw the dog out because of it if the dog was bringing other traits.

As far as showing - if you have a WGSL, they won't do well in an AKC ring. An ASL won't do well in an SV ring. You might try UKC. that seems to be a fairer, less biased, circuit.

 

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It can correct to some extent because it usually comes from the shoulders. My girl is easty-westy and it is her conformation in her shoulders, verified by a PT. The shoulders pull the elbows in and push the feet out. I would not count on it correcting itself. There are exercises you can do to help it and loosen the shoulders with stretching exercises and you can help the pasterns with targeting exercises as well.

I've heard that when the dog's chest deepens in maturity, it will correct to some extent. Mild cases appear to correct to 100%.

It is considered a fault by the SV. it is not disqualifying. My girl has a G rating in her young dog class.

Throwing a dog out of a breeding program for a fault that does not affect health, working ability or temperament is not intelligent breeding. Is it a desirable trait? No. But I wouldn't throw the dog out because of it if the dog was bringing other traits.

As far as showing - if you have a WGSL, they won't do well in an AKC ring. An ASL won't do well in an SV ring. You might try UKC. that seems to be a fairer, less biased, circuit.

Excellent information!

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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My champion girl started out east-westy. Not as extreme as the OP’s puppy, but it was definitely noticeable. Once she got older, her chest dropped and it went away.

You can show a long coat in AKC. It’s not a disqualification. Do they do well? Sometimes. As for UKC, I’ll be honest, I am not a fan. Everyone touts it as being fair and family friendly, but that has not been my experience. Maybe if you have a GSL, the experience is different. Someday I’ll post the story of my last (very last, lol) experience at a UKC show with Scarlet.

Anyway, OP, let your puppy grow up. OFA after 2. Train and see what she can do. Breeding should not be in your brain right now. I have a lovely GSD that I show. She wins. She has a Group placement. I’m not going to breed her. I don’t need to breed her. I can get an equally lovely puppy from my breeder friends.
 
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No one has asked why the OP wants to breed in the first place, even if his dog was without fault.

"He just turned 6 months and weighs 70 lbs."

He's going to be a big boy too.
 
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