German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I'm looking at bringing a long-haired GSD into my home and am getting mixed signals on whether or not my living situation would accommodate this. In short, I can dedicate 1-2 hours a day to exercise/walking/training, have housing that allows GSD breeds, live alone in the Pacific Northwest, can afford medical bills, and grew up with a GSD and a golden previously. The major downside here is that my place is a ~800 square foot 1 BR downtown. The counter to this downside is that, given I can train my doggo, I am encouraged to bring him to work. If this sounds fair, what should I look at in a breeder in terms of assuring temperament suitable to this kind of living situation?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,505 Posts
I don't see any reason why you couldn't have a GSD. I also have a small house, with a teeny tiny backyard, and have the option to take my dog(s) to work with me. I have no trouble at all having shepherds in this set up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,861 Posts
I think you'll do fine. A good GSD is always at your feet, no matter how big the house is. A plus is that you will be getting a lot of outdoor exercise as well!
Deja always tries to be with me, in the bathroom even. No problem for her that she can hardly move in there; as long as she is with me, she's happy and so am I.
One tip of unsolicited advice: get one from a calm temperamented line.
It is a myth that a large dog needs a large yard/house/farm. Many farm dogs would happily move in with you.
Good luck on finding a nice buddy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,893 Posts
We have a fairly small house, with a spacious yard. I can let the girls out, do some random chores, they'll still be sitting on the back porch waiting for me to go outside with them. So yes, as long as you make the effort, you'll be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Hi all,

I'm looking at bringing a long-haired GSD into my home and am getting mixed signals on whether or not my living situation would accommodate this. In short, I can dedicate 1-2 hours a day to exercise/walking/training, have housing that allows GSD breeds, live alone in the Pacific Northwest, can afford medical bills, and grew up with a GSD and a golden previously. The major downside here is that my place is a ~800 square foot 1 BR downtown. The counter to this downside is that, given I can train my doggo, I am encouraged to bring him to work. If this sounds fair, what should I look at in a breeder in terms of assuring temperament suitable to this kind of living situation?
We just got our first GSD, but we've had a few big dogs in the past. There's no reason you can't have a happy, healthy GSD in your situation. The important thing is exercise and working with them. Taking them to a park, running around a small yard and playing together, going down the street - whatever, as long as they're getting the activity, training and affection they need it doesn't matter how they get it. It's a complete myth that a big dog needs acres of land. Like has already been said, a good one is always at your feet anyway! A big dog needs a loving, responsible owner. You can have all the land in the world and let them roam it, doesn't mean they'll be happy, feel loved, or ever learn to behave. You can have an apartment and take the time every day to focus on them and their needs and you'll have the best and healthiest dog around.

For the breeder - This site is full of advice. It guided us to ours. A good breeder will be completely open, first of all. They won't just wave AKC papers in your face, name the bloodline and stick their hand out for your money. And they won't just have one sire and one dam on site cranking them out. They won't just start advertising at birth and have you come pick out your own on site the same day you reach out. When we contacted ours, the first thing he did was invite us to meet the dam and sire and decide whether or not we wanted to make a deposit and start down the road. He talked to us, told us this was her third litter coming up and we met two pups that stayed in the family. One from the first, one from the second. They lived on an adjacent farm owned by the breeder's son. he knew his dogs well. And after they were born, we spent a reasonable amount of time with the litter and with the dog he'd narrowed down for our situation. And so far as I can tell at this point, he was spot on. She's a gem.

From what I have read and learned, you want to avoid first time breeders. Folks who just happen to have a male and female GSD that get pregnant. Or any of the ones on craigslist offering deals. Not that there's anything wrong with the dogs by virtue of that alone, but they have no way to know the outcome and they don't know enough about breeding and adopting them out and you're much more likely to run into someone who doesn't care and is just out to make quick money rather than the primary concern being that both the pup and their forever home are a good match.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,381 Posts
If this puppy get to be with you all the time, what a lucky puppy! With the right exercise, training and management, you should be fine. Wish I'd had the option to take mine to work!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
My first GSD as an adult I lived in a efficiency apt 2 rooms. But it was a ground floor right next to a huge wild park with hundred of acres . And being in the city too, I had tons of sidewalks and other parks for great socialization and sniffing. I just was out with him for hours every day.

Now I have a couple of acres but I think my first dog had the best deal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,884 Posts
taking the GSD to work may or may not be a good idea.

good for your guilt about leaving the dog at home alone , but from the dog's perspective may never get rest , may not enjoy the mauling attention, may become territorial of your office and protective of you, may interfere with your ability to socialize after work or limit your going out for lunch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I don't think small house is a big issue. My boy and I live in a 760 sqft apartment, 3rd floor, with no backyard or what so ever.. He did get his own bedroom tho :) But we are so closed to everything, off leash hiking trail, dog park, nice neighborhood and a plaza with petco.

I took my boy to work once, he seemed pretty nervous and unsettled all the time, and I wasn't able to do anything that day because all I can think of is 'how is he doing.. is he getting bored? does he need water? why is he still asleep.. why is he still awake.. why why why...' Then I decided just work from home. it's easier for both of us, and my coworkers :) I now get to spend 4-5 hours with him everyday training, hiking and playing.. and he seems pretty happy without even thinking, why is my house so small :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,505 Posts
I've taken every puppy for the last 20 years to work with me. Every day. Scarlet, who just turned 6 months old, goes with me. She sleeps the vast majority of the day in a big crate. If she's not sleeping, she's chewing on her bully stick. She's not nervous (at all, lol). I take her to the park on the way home from work, then she plays with the adult dogs at home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,120 Posts
I don't think the size of your house matters much. You could have a mansion, and your GSD will be wherever you are. How nice that you can take your dog to work. I wish I had that option! I think that you sound like you will be a good and responsible owner. GSD puppies require training, structure, and boundaries, esp if you plan to take them into lots of public spaces where they will encounter new people and scenarios everyday. I, personally, chose not to get GSDs until I had a house with a yard. Sadly, I had to wait about 10 long years. I love to walk/hike, but I'm not a runner, so I wasn't sure how I could provide enough aerobic exercise for a GSD otherwise. Lots of people have successfully kept GSDs w/o yards though. I'm sure with planning you can make it work. I would try to come up with an exercise plan where the dog could get out and run, preferably off leash occasionally. And keep in mind that many, if not most, GSDs are not good dog park candidates. If you are renting, also have a plan for what to do if you have to move. I rented for years, and it was always hard to find a nice place that allowed my small breed...let alone a GSD. Most places that allowed pets stipulated no dogs over 30-lbs, and if they did allow larger dogs, they banned GSDs. I'm not trying to discourage you. I just wanted to mention some of the potential drawbacks, and I imagine you have already thought of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
taking the GSD to work may or may not be a good idea.

good for your guilt about leaving the dog at home alone , but from the dog's perspective may never get rest , may not enjoy the mauling attention, may become territorial of your office and protective of you, may interfere with your ability to socialize after work or limit your going out for lunch.
On the face of it being able to take our dogs to work is an attractive idea. We love them, they love us, we want to spend as much time as we can in each other's company. But depending on what work a person does it can be a disaster even beyond the obvious reasons of being territorial, hindering the ability to socialize or go out after work. I remember my grandmother having the sweetest little Chiweenie. A great little lap dog. She was retired so she rarely had to leave home day to day. When she did, Maisie (her dog) virtually always went along. The only exception really being doctor's visits or going to the grocery store. Anything else, she went. On the rare occasion my grandmother would travel or have to go to another city for an appointment and would be gone all day - she'd have us dog sit for her. Let me tell you, that dog had so many issues with separation anxiety. You couldn't leave her in a room for 2 minutes by herself without her literally screaming and panicking, clawing at the door and ultimately tearing stuff up if you were gone too long. When you were present even if not touching her, she was fine just so long as she could see you. She also had no confidence around other dogs or even children or strangers.

Dogs need independent alone time. They need to be crated sometimes, we need to leave them alone sometimes. They should be able to sleep in the dark in a crate all alone, we should be able to crate them when we leave home (or just leave them if you trust them not to tear up everything). It's fine to take them along places, it's amazing even. Heck, if my job allowed for me to take my dog to work she'd get to come along now and then too. Just don't forget to help them forge independence and confidence by not getting them to feel as if you're always there and they never have to be away from you. Because eventually a time will come when they have to be apart from you and next thing you know, you're out a couple grand in sofas or the legs of the table are gnawed off :laugh2:

I'm sure the OP is aware of all that, but I know some people aren't. My grandma never could understand why that little dog would tear up pillows and couch cushions when she'd have to leave her for more than a minute or two. It was from years of never having to be apart from her. And she'd never crate her. "It hurts her feelings, she just screams and cries!" (Because she never had to get used to it!)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,457 Posts
taking the GSD to work may or may not be a good idea.

good for your guilt about leaving the dog at home alone , but from the dog's perspective may never get rest , may not enjoy the mauling attention, may become territorial of your office and protective of you, may interfere with your ability to socialize after work or limit your going out for lunch.
On the face of it being able to take our dogs to work is an attractive idea. We love them, they love us, we want to spend as much time as we can in each other's company. But depending on what work a person does it can be a disaster even beyond the obvious reasons of being territorial, hindering the ability to socialize or go out after work.
It depends on the individual person's type of work, their position at the company, their stability in that position at the company, their coworkers, the typical weather/climate, and so on. It's not possible to generalize.

If:
You have your own office or designated work space,

The ownership is independent (not a chain or franchise - when a chain store changes policy and bans dogs, every location in the country follows suit and dogs are banned),

The coworkers like large dogs, no one has serious allergies (that could be a deal breaker and very unfair to someone else),

You are quick and diligent about cleaning up all messes (including barf, waste outdoors, take the initiative to vacuum your work space frequently on your own time so hair balls don't accumulate, bring the dog's mat/bed home regularly and wash it),

Your individual dog has a temperament conducive to being around people, both familiar coworkers and strange delivery men/customers,

The climate outdoors is reasonably conducive to crating the dog in the car when needed (when the floor cleaners come, if a fire inspector is afraid of dogs and needs to crawl around the office for an hour, if a particular client is allergic or afraid of dogs, and so on!)....

Bringing your dog to work can be awesome. I have at least one of my dogs (usually both) with me, every day, always have. My house is also very small, but I don't think it matters much... the dogs just eat and sleep there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
It depends on the individual person's type of work, their position at the company, their stability in that position at the company, their coworkers, the typical weather/climate, and so on. It's not possible to generalize.

If:
You have your own office or designated work space,

The ownership is independent (not a chain or franchise - when a chain store changes policy and bans dogs, every location in the country follows suit and dogs are banned),

The coworkers like large dogs, no one has serious allergies (that could be a deal breaker and very unfair to someone else),

You are quick and diligent about cleaning up all messes (including barf, waste outdoors, take the initiative to vacuum your work space frequently on your own time so hair balls don't accumulate, bring the dog's mat/bed home regularly and wash it),

Your individual dog has a temperament conducive to being around people, both familiar coworkers and strange delivery men/customers,

The climate outdoors is reasonably conducive to crating the dog in the car when needed (when the floor cleaners come, if a fire inspector is afraid of dogs and needs to crawl around the office for an hour, if a particular client is allergic or afraid of dogs, and so on!)....

Bringing your dog to work can be awesome. I have at least one of my dogs (usually both) with me, every day, always have. My house is also very small, but I don't think it matters much... the dogs just eat and sleep there.
Oh absolutely. If my work was a good environment for my dogs I'd definitely bring them from time to time. If I could every day I'd even be inclined to want to do that as well. There's nothing wrong with doing it, I didn't mean that. The point I was trying to make was just that people should also always get their dog used to being at home alone, in a crate alone, and all that. Sometimes very bad behaviors that are extremely difficult to break later develop when they don't have to be apart from their master at all.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,457 Posts
Oh absolutely. If my work was a good environment for my dogs I'd definitely bring them from time to time. If I could every day I'd even be inclined to want to do that as well. There's nothing wrong with doing it, I didn't mean that. The point I was trying to make was just that people should also always get their dog used to being at home alone, in a crate alone, and all that. Sometimes very bad behaviors that are extremely difficult to break later develop when they don't have to be apart from their master at all.
Agree, the dog also needs to be able to settle and chill at home alone. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
I can see carmspack's point but having brought my dog to work for the last 9.5 years, it's not necessarily like that. As a matter of fact, having Traveler here is so "commonplace" that he doesn't get near the attention you would think.

I will say that I did lay down some rules both for the dog and for my fellow employees:

1. no feeding the dog.
2. no pooping in the office

:grin2:


taking the GSD to work may or may not be a good idea.

good for your guilt about leaving the dog at home alone , but from the dog's perspective may never get rest , may not enjoy the mauling attention, may become territorial of your office and protective of you, may interfere with your ability to socialize after work or limit your going out for lunch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Wow thanks for the great and thoughtful responses everyone! Separation anxiety is something I am concerned about so it's good to hear people weigh in on having some days where I leave my GSD at home. The good news is that I live within a 3 minute walk of where I work so the commute isn't adding excessive time away from home. I've reached out to I-Guard International in WA for next steps :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
I can see carmspack's point but having brought my dog to work for the last 9.5 years, it's not necessarily like that. As a matter of fact, having Traveler here is so "commonplace" that he doesn't get near the attention you would think.

I will say that I did lay down some rules both for the dog and for my fellow employees:

1. no feeding the dog.
2. no pooping in the office

:grin2:

Does "number 2" apply to both dog and coworkers? :wink2:
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top