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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
The answer is NO!

You have a seventeen year old cat that you should not even consider allowing a strange dog near it unsupervised and you are asking way too much from a new dog.

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A 17 year old cat can be easily killed. It would take very little. Hindsight is 20/20. Don't let it happen in the first place.
Thanks for the reply. I read up extensively last night until I fell asleep (literally). So I ended up putting Elsa in a crate by herself in another room, but with the room door open. I'm going to take her out on a leash so she can go potty and have some food/water. I'm wondering if she'll even be better after 2 weeks or not. Honestly, it's somewhat of a deal breaker if she can't be left unsupervised with the other animals.
 

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Things will improve. Try to follow the "shut down" as much as possible.
 

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Each dog is different and must be assessed individually. When I remarried, he had a rescue very dominant Rottweiler, I had five cats over ten. I knew coming in the door that I would never let this hard headed dominant dog alone with my cats.

I was wrong, the Rottie came to love and adore my cats and doted on them, but it took a lot of time and supervision.

Do not rush anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Things will improve. Try to follow the "shut down" as much as possible.
I talked to my neighbor, who is a vet tech, and he thinks a week might be long enough, but agreed that every dog is different. He suggested letting Aero and Sylvester come out (Sylvester insisted) but keep Elsa on a leash, even when outdoors. She sniffed Sylvester and that was it - Sylvester wasn't scared, but he seems to choose which dogs he is and isn't afraid of.

I picked up a crate from Walmart last night spur of the moment and am returning it in a few minutes, because it's a tad small.

I'm also noticing that Elsa has some dominance traits. She tried jumping on me, which got a stern NO, and wrapped her front legs around my right foot as if she wanted to hump it, and that got another NO and I took her off gently. Can this behavior be broken eventually?
 

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the length of time depends on the dog.
for my 20 year old cat, i crated my foster dog for a month, before i was sure he would be ok. after 2 weeks i'd let him hang out with us, watching tv out of his crate, but he would still be leashed to me. no way in h*ll am i risking my cats safety.
he was allowed to look at the cat, but if he stared at the cat he got a verbal correction.
i'd crate her for as long as you can, then i'd put the cats, with food, water and litter in their own room, and keep them in there until you get home. Once you get home, cats are released, and she immediately either goes on a leash in the house, that you hold, or she goes back in her crate.
like i said, my foster was crated, watching everyone (cats and dogs) interact. i went out of my way to get the cats on me, so i could pet them and have him see me interact with them.

as far as the dominant traits... it could be she's just happy. jumping up is excitement as well as trying to hump. just because a dog tries to hump something doesn't mean it's dominant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
the length of time depends on the dog.
for my 20 year old cat, i crated my foster dog for a month, before i was sure he would be ok. after 2 weeks i'd let him hang out with us, watching tv out of his crate, but he would still be leashed to me. no way in h*ll am i risking my cats safety.
he was allowed to look at the cat, but if he stared at the cat he got a verbal correction.
Aside from using the word NO, what commands should I be using when talking to her, besides her name obviously? I don't want to stress her out with too many new commands right away.

i'd crate her for as long as you can, then i'd put the cats, with food, water and litter in their own room, and keep them in there until you get home. Once you get home, cats are released, and she immediately either goes on a leash in the house, that you hold, or she goes back in her crate.
like i said, my foster was crated, watching everyone (cats and dogs) interact. i went out of my way to get the cats on me, so i could pet them and have him see me interact with them.
She hasn't really given much thought to Sylvester period.

So if I follow msvette's instructions, do I still need her on a leash while watching TV, or is that at my discretion whether she does good? She's still slightly hesitant to go in the crate without me putting in a treat, but she's doing far better now than before. Also, both Sylvester and Aero sleep in my room. Would it be better for her if she were in my room, so she could see everything that's going on? It's only a 2 bedroom house, so I don't have the luxury of every animal getting their own room, plus I plan on renting out my spare bedroom very soon anyways.

[/quote]
as far as the dominant traits... it could be she's just happy. jumping up is excitement as well as trying to hump. just because a dog tries to hump something doesn't mean it's dominant.[/QUOTE]

That's true, and she is young. I suppose it came as a surprise, because Aero never did that, but Aero is also an older dog, and he never did that.

As for recall - Aero has pretty good recall, and he can be trusted most of the time to be off-leash. With a young dog, is that substantially harder to do? We plan on going camping possibly next weekend, and both dogs will be off leash (but it's in the desert, so there's really nowhere to run for either).
 

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I talked to my neighbor, who is a vet tech, and he thinks a week might be long enough
Many people have never heard of a "two week shut down", and many still think you just bring the dog home and "let them work it out".

This gives the dog no idea who is the leader in the home, and can be disastrous.

If you don't "get" why there's a two week shut down recommended, then you'll not see the point of it, no.
 

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i use anything that will get the dogs attention, and get it looking away from the cat.

there's looking at the cat, then LOOKING at the cat.
you'll see a difference.
when i brought my foster in, he stared at my cats when they came out of my room (no dogs in my room, cats only), after some verbal corrections and time, he would glance at the cat, then go back to sleeping or resting or whatever he was doing.
THAT is when i opened his crate and let him out.
if he went towards the cat, he again got told to leave it. he understood then, fully, that they were above him in the pecking order, and not to be messed with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Many people have never heard of a "two week shut down", and many still think you just bring the dog home and "let them work it out".

This gives the dog no idea who is the leader in the home, and can be disastrous.

If you don't "get" why there's a two week shut down recommended, then you'll not see the point of it, no.
Trust me, I get it. I go with some of my neighbor's advice, but others, I take with a grain of salt. Like raw meat/bones - he warns about pancreitis - I'm aware of the risks. However, Aero gets raw stuff on a regular basis, has since I've got him, and hasn't had any problems. Add to the fact that his coat is almost as soft as the cat's (who is a Norwegian Forest Cat, also long haired) and is healthy otherwise.

She seems to be okay in the crate, and when she cried last night, it lasted only about 5 minutes, while I ignored her. Should I move the crate to my room after a week? I also have the door open to the room she's in, so the other animals can see what's going on and she can see them interact.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
i use anything that will get the dogs attention, and get it looking away from the cat.

there's looking at the cat, then LOOKING at the cat.
you'll see a difference.
when i brought my foster in, he stared at my cats when they came out of my room (no dogs in my room, cats only), after some verbal corrections and time, he would glance at the cat, then go back to sleeping or resting or whatever he was doing.
THAT is when i opened his crate and let him out.
if he went towards the cat, he again got told to leave it. he understood then, fully, that they were above him in the pecking order, and not to be messed with.
Thankfully, I never had that problem, aside from Aero LOOKING, but sniffing as well. He pretty much respected Sylvester from day 1, although there are a few times he might chase Sylvester, but the Sylvester comes back up to him. They only time Sylvester hisses at Aero is when Aero's wagging tail swipes him repeatedly in the face.

As for Elsa, she hasn't really done any LOOKING, but just looks at the cat and meanders on her business. Being that this breed has a high prey drive, I'm somewhat surprised.
 

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this isn't a great shot... but here's Del and Moose grabbing some sun together

 

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Kitty pics (Aero and Sylvester):
Can't wait for the day that my dog and cat can do that...Currently Tank and Babaganoush (cat) are tolerant of each other, they can be in the same room though sometimes Tank will just focus on the cat and I have to remind him that's not okay. Recently, they've been starting to touch noses and have physical contact where Tank will paw at the cat, cat willl paw back and bite Tank's paw, rinse and repeat...it's adorable.
 

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Even dogs that are known for being high prey and chasing cats can be taught not to, but it all depends on the individual dog. Most of our dogs do adjust well to the cats, and are good with them. Our past dogs were downright excellent with them, as you can see in these pictures.











 
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