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Fonzie, German Shepherd
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I gave my dog over 2 hours of exercise, he's 5 months old. I trained him for 15 mins, then a 30 min walk. After, I took him for an hour's walk with some flirt poll action and some socialization. He slept one hour after and then ran all over the house. Then I trained him 30 more mins at night with another 30-minute walk, which he was not tired! Is this normal to have so much energy and not be tired? I know gsds have insane levels of energy, especially puppies, but mine never gets tired.
 

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If all of the time spent together is active and exciting it becomes habitual. Just hanging out not doing much of anything teaches pups to settle. It's good to be boring sometimes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If all of the time spent together is active and exciting it becomes habitual. Just hanging out not doing much of anything teaches pups to settle. It's good to be boring sometimes.

after a walk or train session, I will sit on the couch and relax, however he can not relax
 

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If he's crate trained schedule his down time just like you schedule his other activities. Give him something safe to chew,a stuffed frozen Kong perhaps.What I used to do with puppies is play/train right before meals.Then potty break and nap time while their tummy is full and they are calmed down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If he's crate trained schedule his down time just like you schedule his other activities. Give him something safe to chew,a stuffed frozen Kong perhaps.What I used to do with puppies is play/train right before meals.Then potty break and nap time while their tummy is full and they are calmed down.

i normally train him with his food, since he has a very high food drive. People made me think that putting him in his crate for a nap is wrong after exercise...
 

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Being calm and having good manners is a manner of habit. Training is simply developing habits that are mutually beneficial to the dog and handler.

Set the dog up for success with mental and physical exercise and then instill thr habit of being calm. A crate, bed, couch, air conditioning vent, whatever, can be made a habit. Control excitement inside the home. Train a crate or place command. Help the dog learn to take his emotional cues from you.

Basically, watch a minimum of 43 Stonnie Dennis videos and do your best to emulate him.
 
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Fonzie, German Shepherd
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Try sitting down with him outside, mix it into your walk or play session. Sit next to tree or on grass hill and just chill and checkout the world.
Being calm and having good manners is a manner of habit. Training is simply developing habits that are mutually beneficial to the dog and handler.

Set the dog up for success with mental and physical exercise and then instill thr habit of being calm. A crate, bed, couch, air conditioning vent, whatever, can be made a habit. Control excitement inside the home. Train a crate or place command. Help the dog learn to take his emotional cues from you.

Basically, watch a minimum of 43 Stonnie Dennis videos and do your best to emulate him.

should I reward him for being calm all day?
 

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Fonzie, German Shepherd
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
At first I would, reward small successes. Like if he sits next to you, reward the sit.

he will sometimes chill out, but he wants to play all day with our older dog and our older dog corrects him all time time and goes back even more. He never leaves him alone, when he does i reward him. Thank you for your help! :)
 

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I found that with my pup an on-leash walk did almost nothing to tire him out. His natural pace was so much faster than my pace. He needed frequent long off-leash hikes where he could run and explore.

The other thing that help was lots of socialization adventures. Seeing and experiencing new things seemed to help reduce his mental energy.

He needed lots of chew toys. He relaxed best if he had something to carry around and chew on when he laid down.

The number one rule of german Shepherd puppies is, "A tired dog is a good dog."

At 14 months, my boy is still very energetic. He is starting to manage himself better... but if we go a day without a hike, he becomes nippy the next day.
 

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I will second the idea to teach a “place” command. I have a service dog in training and we also participate in Schutzhund. Though I wouldn’t call him a high energy dog, he has a great level of drive. I have yet to find the end to his want to work and given he works for a good portion of the day, he’s on standby (usually in place) for hours at a time.
A solid place command gives him a ‘stand by’ gear that has been extremely helpful with teaching his off switch. Of course, he’d rather be outside playing endless fetch but while in “place” he knows that just isn’t going to happen.

I started with a cheap bathmat and only took it out for “place” work. Get him down on it and try to reach one minute, regularly treating. Lengthen the duration and interval between treats. Baby steps. It soon becomes an activity that works the mind.
 

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Fonzie, German Shepherd
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I found that with my pup an on-leash walk did almost nothing to tire him out. His natural pace was so much faster than my pace. He needed frequent long off-leash hikes where he could run and explore.

The other thing that help was lots of socialization adventures. Seeing and experiencing new things seemed to help reduce his mental energy.

He needed lots of chew toys. He relaxed best if he had something to carry around and chew on when he laid down.

The number one rule of german Shepherd puppies is, "A tired dog is a good dog."

At 14 months, my boy is still very energetic. He is starting to manage himself better... but if we go a day without a hike, he becomes nippy the next day.

how can I make him explore when I live in the city?
 

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how can I make him explore when I live in the city?
City parks, Provincial parks, big box home centers are all "new & exciting" places for a pup to explore. Set up a small obstacle course with household items in your yard or living room. Play scent & nosework games in your house- hide & seek with a toy. 2-ball fetch is a time and space efficient way to introduce "retrieves" and tire him out. Let him listen to & watch people, dogs, birds and traffic go by.
 
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+1 to stores. We have a couple of stores in the area which are pet friendly. Empty sidewalks and busy sidewalks. Foot traffic, bike traffic, car, traffic, and everything in between. One of our favorite places was wandering around the local university. There is no shortage of people doing unexpected things around a school.

We walked on all sorts of surfaces; grass, roads, muddy trails, even rickety old bridges.

We heard all sorts of sounds.

Basically, anything that exposes pup to new situations and stimulated his senses. When my pup was between 4-8 months a 60-minute adventure would cause him to sleep like a log for several hours.

Mental stimulation is as important as physical stimulation in wearing a pup out.

I also used a 30 ft lead. I was able to walk along normally, while pup sniffed and explored everything in the radius of the leash. It does take a bit of practice to manage a 30-foot leash!
 
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