German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So we’re moving to a new place (rental) with some acres in which our GSD can roam freely.

The downfall to this new place is that it’s off a main road and there is no fencing besides a small cornered area in the back of the house enclosing the detached garage and creating a courtyard type backyard. Our husband and I love the idea and space our boy can run in the front of the home but with the lack of fencing and being near the main road, and some goats for neighbors, having a lost or injured dog is far great in the scenario.

Building a fence on a home we’ll be renting is way over budget for the amount we have to put up so my husband is deciding on wanting to use a shock collar and creating a border (invisible fence) with it.

I’m somewhat against the idea of an e-collar but I am open to it if it be a last resort for us. So I’m hoping to get some ideas/alternatives/tips anyone has even pros/cons on types of e-collars/fences. If we had the budget for it, I’d be all for a fence but it’s just too much money to spend on somewhere we’ll be living for a short while.
Worse case scenario is our boy needing to always being supervised when out in front of the home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
I personally use an e-fence so I can't say I dislike them in some situations. However, a lot of people do have a big problem with them, and I can understand why. For us it works good, we live on a large acreage quite far from a road. I do keep a pretty good eye on my dogs though, I do not like them being out of sight, I worry about stray dogs, we have coyotes, hunters in nearby properties, etc.

That being said, I would not use them if I lived in a subdivision or right near a busy road. I would also be worried about the possibility of theft, depending on how friendly your dog was. For example, just yesterday I saw my female blow through the e-fence chasing a squirrel with her shock collar on. She hates being shocked, and she understands the fence boundary completely, but in full prey mode she can be through the fence in an instant. In this case I didn't have her collar on tight enough, my bad. Sometimes I have seen her blow through without blinking an eye, other times I have seen her react to the shock (her body slightly curls / jumps), so I know she has felt it, but she just keeps running - scary! It does takes some time to fully train your dog and get the right settings on the level of the shock etc also, mistakes will happen and you will need to readjust things on your fence or collar to make it work as it should (which takes time and the possibility of mistakes), which is going to be difficult and worrisome if you are so close to a road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,889 Posts
The issue with underground fences is that the dog will go thru the fence while in drive chasing something but when they try to come back in, they are not in drive so the shock will keep them out.

Your solutions are invisible fence with collar and train the dog very, very well so she never goes past the beeper, solid fence or supervision. Personally, my dogs are not allowed to run loose without me and they are not allowed to be out wtihout a drag line until their recall is solid. I live right on a road too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
We had to have a chain link fence and an e-fence at one time.. digging under and bolting out to the neighbors pond... it was crazy .. guess what breed was it?!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Now, just 3 separate areas of chain link fence. And don’t blame me.. we have a regular coons and possums and what not coming and I hand feed them, some of them and they are in the front yard, dogs never meet them.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,423 Posts
The “goats for neighbors” detail is a game changer.

I flat out would not trust a buried electric fence to keep an unattended and untrained GSD away from goats.

An e-collar with you controlling the remote, and training, is an option.

A long line is another option, and you can phase it out with training.

No matter which choice of tool you make, from Day 1 you need to make it crystal clear to your dog that any interest in the goats next door is a hard no. No staring, no lunging, no stalking, and absolutely no chasing - including dashing back and forth along the outside of their fence. It’s much easier to teach a dog “NEVER, EVER” than try and do damage control after the dog realizes they are fun to chase.

If it’s an adult dog without any training around livestock, I’d start with the dog on a prong collar and a long line. Any interest in the goats or attempts to lunge at them = NO [correction] - LEAVE IT.

It sounds like a nice big piece of property, hopefully the move goes smoothly and you have good neighbors!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
Since you're renting the place, did you get permission from the land owner for any kind of work, whether fencing or underground invisible fencing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
I would build a 6' high chain link run to the size you can afford and think is practical. It will need a good doghouse. It is not at all difficult and doing it yourself will save a lot of money. The corner and line post don't have to bet set in concrete since you won't be there for a long time and then you can take the fencing with you or sell it when you move. If chain link is too expensive, 6' welded wire fence attached to 4" x 4" pressure treated posts, 8' long will work. A run is the most reliable way to increase the odds of keeping your dog safe. You can use a long line and an e-collar on low stim to teach boundaries and a reliable recall. I would start off with positive approaches at first to teach what behaviors you want and then proof those behaviors with the long line and e-collar at low stim. Using high stim with an e-collar or electric fence, especially when the dog has no idea what is expected of him, will create issues that are easily avoided.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
It's only having that nice big property available that makes it so tempting. I'm not anti-ecollar, but if you don't want to use one, and don't want the expense of fencing, you don't need a fence. Walk your dog three times a day, healthy adult dogs do fine on scheduled potty breaks. Train and play with your dog, use a long line if you must and do structured activities, tug, fetch, obedience, tricks, whatever, with a focus on action, so that you can give your dog mental physical stimulation. People have gsd's in apartments or small city properties, and do fine, they train/play/work their dogs. So you can try that. You can install a small fenced run off the back door (small is cheap) for easy on the human potty breaks, and block off or avoid the view of those goats.
If you train an awesome recall (and this is some I use an ecollar for) you can enjoy the full property, supervised together.

Pretty much what @WIBackpacker already said, but I'm in a chatty mood.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top