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Discussion Starter #1
So, here's the situation.

In August 2011, I will start classes at Mississippi State University. I have looked around the area and most apartments and rentals allow dogs, including German Shepherds.

I had a dog in March or April, a puppy. However, I couldn't keep her inside so I kept her outside. After talking and thinking a lot, I came to the conclusion that it would be best if I get a dog, to keep him or her inside the house. I couldn't give that to her, so I thought it best for her to rehome her. i rehomed her.

I told my mother my plans and she seems doubtful a bit. She thinks that I "put the cart before the horse". She is a very important person to me, so her opinion counts a lot.

I talked to my breeder and she knows the situation, and she thinks it's fine, especially since after I finish community college I'll have two months to spend with my puppy before classes at MSU start.

I have doubts because my mother has doubts. If my mother hadn't of told me her opinion, I'd feel %100 confident.

I feel like I wish I had some support. I feel like she doesn't have to do anything with the dog, but I just want to know that she is behind me, know what I mean?

I feel sad right now, I feel like crying. I miss my dog that I rehomed, I loved her so much. I believe in myself and believe that if I want this to work, it'll work.

I just need some advice. I want someone to tell me that the decisions I am making make sense.

I just want someone to tell me it's okay. That I'm doing a good job. When I mess up, people love to jump down my throat. But I never know when I'm doing good because no one tells me I'm doing good. And so I always feel like the decisions I make are bad.

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Sounds as though you made the best decision for your dog to find it a home. I can see how that experience might be influencing your mother's opinion now. She probably just doesn't want to see you get into the same situation again which would be very sad for you and another dog. But if you've checked into gsd friendly housing, have two months to spend with the pup before school starts and plan on training, it sounds like you have all the bases covered. Maybe if you line up a doggie day care or dog walker just in case it's necessary your mom might see that you're planning well in advance and are considering every option. Let's face it, there's rarely a perfect time to get a puppy, so many things we think we plan for come along and surprise us, but it sounds as though you're doing a job good job of anticipating the needs and requirements of your new pup.
 

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If your breeder is close to you, how about helping her socialize litters, and train and work with her breeding stock?

I worry a little bit about your breeder, knowing that you rehomed a puppy because you were unable to give the puppy indoor accomadations, they are ready to place another puppy with you at this time. I find that reckless on their part, not necessarily yours.

It is extremely hard to put off what we want badly. But my advice to you would be to wait until you are out of college before getting a puppy. Wait until you have six months in a job after you finish college and you are settled in the home you will be living in for a while.

If you cannot live without a dog, get a senior from a pound that is not too picky where the dog is going to. That way, you will be giving an older dog a new lease on life, you will learn a lot from the dog, vet bills might be tough, but there is no guarantee that that will not happen with a pup either.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If your breeder is close to you, how about helping her socialize litters, and train and work with her breeding stock?

I worry a little bit about your breeder, knowing that you rehomed a puppy because you were unable to give the puppy indoor accomadations, they are ready to place another puppy with you at this time. I find that reckless on their part, not necessarily yours.

It is extremely hard to put off what we want badly. But my advice to you would be to wait until you are out of college before getting a puppy. Wait until you have six months in a job after you finish college and you are settled in the home you will be living in for a while.

If you cannot live without a dog, get a senior from a pound that is not too picky where the dog is going to. That way, you will be giving an older dog a new lease on life, you will learn a lot from the dog, vet bills might be tough, but there is no guarantee that that will not happen with a pup either.
No, no, she's not going to place a puppy with me right now. She's placing her with me next year when I'll have moved out.

6 more years of college . . .

2 for the B.S.
4 for vet school
 

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Are you independently wealthy?

I mean, I know vet school is not cheap, and you must be sponsored and all. Living off campus costs a fortune as does living on campus.

You have not lived on your own before? If not, you really do not have the entire picture of what that will cost, where all the hidden expenses are?

Are you going to have to work and go to school.

See, to me, that is a terrible time to get a puppy. And doggy daycare is nice but money for that does not grow on trees.

So if you are independently wealthy, ignore everything I mentioned and buy the pup when you move out. Having classes here and there, with plenty of time for pup training and playtime. Of course going to school full time is usually more demanding that working full time, but chances are your presence will be able to be in the vacinity of the puppy for more time than the full-time job.

If you will have to work to help make your expenses, or if you will be on a very tight budget, than forget it for now.

Good luck.
 

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Because you don't have other dogs, fostering may be an option? Or at least helping with a shelter or rescue.
You'd be able to help in ways that are too numerous to point out here, and in your state, there is such a need for helping with rescue.
 

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i would suggest not getting a puppy until you're settled. Vet school and internships can take a lot of time away from time you would need to do training. I would also suggest if you really want another dog, rescue an older one from the shelter. You can still train (and will probably have to re-housetrain) but the dog wont be nearly as demanding on your time as a pup would be. Props for school though! I cant go back until my kids are in school themselves.
 

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Sounds like you've been through a lot trying to make the right choices for your dog and your future. I know how it feels to really yearn for a pup -- right now, I'm going to college in downtown LA, and live in non-pet-friendly housing with four roommates, so my puppy plans are on hold, but I can certainly relate.

Honestly, if you are just starting at a new school, consider waiting on a puppy, even if you feel you have worked out a good schedule, living arrangement, etc for the puppy. I'm not saying that as a reflection of you or your dog ownership -- I'm suggesting it as something you can do for yourself. College can be emotionally, intellectually, and financially overwhelming, especially if you're looking to go to grad school. No matter how responsible you are or how much you've got figured out (and it sounds like you've done a lot of thinking in that department), starting college with a pup would be tough.

My advice would be to focus on yourself, meeting people, getting involved, and most importantly your academics. If you're doing it right, it is a lot more time consuming than you might imagine. If you find after a semester or so that you've got it all together, then go for it, but you owe it to yourself to do college the right way for you and your future.

In the meantime, find a nearby rescue, and establish a relationship with the manager that allows you to drop in and walk, train and help care for the dogs there. That's what I've done here, and I get my "fur fix" and go home knowing that I'm making a difference to some shelter dogs in need of a little love too.

Of course, this loooong post is all just my own personal experience, as a fellow collegiate GSD lover. :) Either way, I hope you can make a decision you feel good about, and I wish you lots of luck with school!
 

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I just need some advice. I want someone to tell me that the decisions I am making make sense.

I just want someone to tell me it's okay. That I'm doing a good job. When I mess up, people love to jump down my throat. But I never know when I'm doing good because no one tells me I'm doing good. And so I always feel like the decisions I make are bad.
I think you need to learn to look within yourself to find these reassurances. You sound younger than you say you are many times, and this is one of those times. You will find that in life there are going to be many disappointments if you have to rely on others to tell you that you're doing good, that everything is going to be ok, and you'll sometimes be hard pressed to find people who point out the good and not the bad. Other than a close friend, that's just not how the world works unfortunately.
 

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The problem with your first two statement, "I want some advice. I want someone to tell me that the decisions I am making make sense." well they do not work properly together.

Wanting advice, and wanting to be told that you are making the right choice are two separate things. You are qualifying the advice you are asking for.

In fact, you are saying, I want advice from people who agree with me. Or, you are saying, I want you to tell me what I want to hear.

I think you are not alone. I think a lot of people, if they are totally honest, only want people to agree with them, and tell them what they want to hear.

But people who disagree with you can either do so, or take the hint to shut up. The problem with that, is how does that serve the future puppy?

If you are going to get a pup when you move out regardless, maybe a hoard of faceless internet junkies are not going to sway your mind at all. And by the sound of it, we are now supposedly at fault for DRIVING you to your decision. But we are giving our advice from our personal and shared experience, and that may not be what you want to hear.

If you go to the internet site for advice, the chances are that if you look hard enough, you will find SOME babe-chick to tell you to go ahead and breed your six month old dog-aggressive rescue puppy with no papers and severe separation anxiety.
 

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When you've completed college you'll have a lot more confidence too.
 
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