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Discussion Starter #1
If a breeder chooses two (or more?) pups in a litter that are recommended to be suitable for you, what factors would you use to determine which one to take? At that point does it just come down to general appearance, or is there anything else to look for, maybe specific physical traits?
 

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Do you get to meet them first? Is gender an issue, or are they both the same?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This is more of a hypothetical question. But lets assume they are the same gender, and it is not possible to meet them first.
 

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I would have her choose the calmer dog, the dog who is more resilient under stress. Even for a high-level competition prospect, calm doesn't mean lazy.. think of an adult dog who can cope with changes associated with travel for competing, crowds. etc. For companion dogs-- same thing! Choose the calmer pup who is more resilient to stress.
 

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If by "suitable" you mean for a particular purpose (Schutzhund, or other competitive sport, SAR, or as a family companion), that would cover basic temperament, but not necessarily personality. Unless you're an expert on structure, which most people aren't, I would rely on the breeder's input there, and all things being roughly equal - nerves and drive, gender, and structure, I'd go with personality and looks to make my decision, which are subjective.

As Patti mentioned, calm is good. You may want a more aloof dog, or you may want a more social dog. You may prefer independent dogs, or you may love snuggly cuddle bugs. You may want less prey drive if you have a small dog or cats, or you might want a dog that goes crazy for balls and other moving objects, a spitfire or a more laid back dog. That's all personal preference, and much of that is apparent at a fairly young age. For example, Keefer was described by the breeder as being affectionate, outgoing, and first to the food bowl among his litter. She was absolutely dead on! He thrives on physical affection, is confident and social with people and other dogs, and will do back flips for food. Dena was chasing and retrieving balls that she could barely fit in her mouth at 9 weeks old. So that's the kind of thing I'd want to know about their personalities.

And lastly, there is nothing wrong with preferring certain looks. Sables, solid blacks, bi-colors, longcoats (my fav), go with whatever grabs you. I'd assume that even if you wouldn't be able to meet the puppies in advance you'd at least get to see pictures and maybe even videos, which would be especially good because you could see them interact with each other and their littermates.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for the interesting points. I am making note of all this! I still have lots of time to kill before I get my boy.
 

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I tend to think there is a big differance regarding the type of dog you want. For example, if you want a SCH dog, you and your breeder might select a pup that is very different then if you are leaning toward a companion dog.

Define what you want, and with the help of a good breeder go from there.
 

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I think all relies on personal preferences and purpose. You mentioned calm, but as long as the pup as good nerves I prefer the most active. My actual pup is more on the reflexive said and I confess I miss the activity of the previous dog I've raised. But I suppose after a Border Collie and a Belgian mix every pup is calmer.
 

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if the dogs are from a reputable breeder and a strong pedigree you should be ok, i think!!!! i bought my dog because he's blk&red an a German import. he comes from 5 or 6 generations of Schutzhund trained dogs. mine is a pet and he's becoming well trained. i think how you train them, how you are around them has alot to do with their personality. their living situation. we live in a small house with our 9 month old GSD and our 7 year old Grey Hound and they're pretty calm. the GSD puppy sits, stays, lays down, will bring you a ball, won't walk out the front door when it's open and that's with people calling him or people calling him with their dogs. they can walk up to our steps and let the dogs get nose to nose and he won't walk out of the house. well i have to go. the Shep next door is out and he wants to go and say hello.
 

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I would prefer the pup that balks at nothing new (within reason), the bold and curious pup, the active pup, the bitey pup, one that will retrieve anything I toss (or try to), the confident pup, the nosey pup (as far as sniffing out scents go), the pup that'll take roughhousing as an invitation to roughhouse harder, the pup that'll be focused on me and watching me, very toy crazy, food crazy helps too, one that will accept pets and cuddles.... black sable a plus!


This is assuming that the litter genetics are everything I want- high drive, high energy, rock solid on/off switch, known for being good house dogs, EXCELLENT nerves, high biddability, great tracking ability, and good versatility. Known kid lovers are a huge plus. I don't want a pure sport breeding bred to only win win win at the sport, I want a breeding that will do well in all sorts of venues like sport, SAR, PSD, etc. A true, well rounded GSD as it was meant to be!

Oh, and I really want a dog that will NOT peter out after only 45 minutes of fetch. If I'm going to the park for some fetch, that dog had darn well be ready for HOURS of hard fetch and training and toys and retrieving balls or logs, whatever I choose!
 

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isn't hours of hard fetching, training and retrieving a little much? we train for 5 to 10 minutes a session 3 or 4 times a day. fetching, i roll a ball in the house or toss it outside again just for short periods. in the summertime isn't hours of anything to much??? in the summer we do more things in the evening or early morning. in the winter i figure if i'm a bit cold then so is he and we call it quits.
 

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Quote: isn't hours of hard fetching, training and retrieving a little much? we train for 5 to 10 minutes a session 3 or 4 times a day. fetching, i roll a ball in the house or toss it outside again just for short periods. in the summertime isn't hours of anything to much???
You bring up a good point. Everyone has a different idea of the "perfect" dog for them. You (like me) don't really want a dog that wants to go all the time. Most days, my dog Luca is happy with a few minutes of hall ball or a walk around the neighborhood, then he's back on the couch! LOL.

But other people (like Diana) would be bored to sobs with a couch potato dog like mine!

GSDs come in lots of flavors...and that's why it's important to 1.) know yourself and 2.) know what you want in a dog before you go looking for one. And then find a breeder or rescue you trust enough to match you with the dog that will do best in your life--and be honest with them about what activity level you want.
 

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Originally Posted By: doggiedadisn't hours of hard fetching, training and retrieving a little much? we train for 5 to 10 minutes a session 3 or 4 times a day.
IT'S NEVER ENOUGH!!
I may come from working lines myself


I started with very, very small sesion, but if I have the time now we are training for 20-30 minutes (which means lots of play and tossing the ball and me bending over a little pup until my back hurts).

I believe in the philosophy that in training, as in any other discipline you need to train endurance and as long as you end always before the pup gets tired of bored you can sort of teach to keep motivation longer and longer if the dog has the genetics to.
 

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Then there's the best of both worlds. A dog that will work or play until their pads fall off on the field and can settle in with just a little exercise. My female is that to a tee. couch potato in the house and a land shark on the field. My male is not that far from that either. This is why I like the GSD so much. Very few other dogs can do the type of work that they can while remaining balanced in the real world.
 

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Originally Posted By: Luca_stlEveryone has a different idea of the "perfect" dog for them.
Exactly! The OP wasn't asking what WE were looking for in the "perfect" dog, she asked what factors SHE should look at to determine the right choice for HER. (Or him, sorry, not sure if you're male or female.
) Personality preferences are so subjective, and the OP brought up a theoretical situation where more than one pup would be suitable for whatever purpose she (or he) has in mind, making the decision more complicated.
 

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Quote:couch potato in the house and a land shark on the field.
That's more like it! I want a dog to be lazy with me and crazy with me.
I rest hard and play hard!

Cassidy's Mom is right, everything is subjective with the perfect puppy match, but maybe with all these experiences she can see "oh, that person wants that kind of pup but wants to do ALL THOSE THINGS, maybe that's way too much for me and that's not the sort of pup I want." Examples are good!

Honestly, if the breeder feels either pup would be the PERFECT match for me after giving the breeder everything I am looking for in a dog and says I can pick, I would then choose on cuteness/color, but ONLY then!
 

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In chosing it depends which you would like to have-if you'd like a calmer dog or if you'd like the more outgoing-" nothing phases it " type.And there is nothing wrong with choosing the puppy that "chooses" you.It's kind of like-which ever wins your heart.Now all this said -I am assuming that it is just for a companion pet.For other purposes their personalities would need to be considered quite a bit and the breeder could probably steer you in the right direction.All the best.
 

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i don't mind a dog that wants to be on the go all of the time i mean isn't hours of anything to much for a dog????
 

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No two puppies are exactly the same.

If breeder says there are two that might do for you, ask how breeder would describe each pup and how they behaved with litter mates etc... Then ask how breeder would expect each to mature.

Minor differences may make your choice easier.
 
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