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Hi all,
I have a 10 month old female GSD. She is in good health but I live in the south where temperature and humidity can get pretty high.
Summer is coming up and I'm wondering if anyone can recommend a good room temperature setting for our GSD.
I thought a room temp of about 72 or 73 degrees during the day and night would be ok for her, but husband likes it warmer at 75 or 76 degrees.
I think this is too hot for her, especially with her coat (but she's not a long hair GSD).

She also seems to be drinking a lot more water now, especially at night, which makes me think the temperature is too high for her.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
Annie
 

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I bet your husband likes the warmer temp in Summer because it keeps the AC bill lower; he probably likes it cooler in the Winter if the furnace is on. The age old thermostat battle lol.

A GSD will seek out the cool floor in the Summer, if you have any, every time. 75-76 is pretty warm to sleep in even for us as the nights are hot and humid. Some of them like a fan on.
 

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My current pup and my past two GSDs didn't like warm house temps, which worked fine since my husband and I prefer it cooler too. We keep the daytime temps around 72 in summer and 68-70 in the winter. We prefer temps in the 60s for sleeping at night. After a big storm last week, our power was off for the night and much of the day. Luca, my 8 month old pup, apparently doesn't understand electricity and AC and kept coming and nudging me in the night to make it less hot.😆
 

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I would keep it at what the humans are comfortable. The dog will be fine. I use a ceiling fan plus large box fan for my dog when he's crated and can't move around as much and then he decides where he wants to lie when we're home (we keep it at 76 during the day and 74 at night .. cause we live in TX and don't want to spend $400 trying to cool the house down further). I have a solid black GSD and he's fine with those temps.
 

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panting, seeking out cool spots, drinking more water are all normal not severe responses to being warm, therefore do not need to be catered to. your dog will eventually acclimate and once her adult coat comes in fully - it will also help with insulation (protection from both cold and heat).

for the most part, temperatures in my area stay between 40-80° at all times of year.... i don’t take any special or unusual precautions until outside of that range and my animals learn to manage.

i agree with the person above... keep the house at a temperature that’s comfortable for humans.
 

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My dogs deal with whatever temp I like my house at lol. Never had any issues, they get accustomed to the temperature they regularly live with
 

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It’s not healthy for dogs to be inside a home that is cooled extremely low with AC because of the differential between going outside to extreme heat and inside to extreme cold.
 

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My dog copes better with low humidity and a higher temperature, than high humidity and a lower temperature. I live in a sub tropical climate and in summer I exercise him at dawn, the coolest part of the day, usually 73 degrees. If he needs to lie down and pant on our walks, I'm happy to wait for him to recover. I also carry water for him.
 

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It’s not healthy for dogs to be inside a home that is cooled extremely low with AC because of the differential between going outside to extreme heat and inside to extreme cold.
Got sources?
 
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I keep it at a temperature I prefer. I would also never have it at 77 in my home. The dog will be fine at those temperatures though maybe less active. Temperatures above 80 are usually when I start seeing trainings be canceled. The exact temperature varies from place to place though.
 

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Experienced dog owners.
So the 8 degrees between 75 and 67 is going to be detrimental to the health of the dog?

What about different climates?

If you're in Louisiana or Florida or Arizona or..., you can't take your dog outside?

I'm sorry but this makes no sense whatsoever. As long as the dog has adequate water and shade available, they will self regulate. Cooler indoor temps help dump core temperature.

Some dogs will be less likely to work in higher temperatures if they are accustomed to AC, but I totally disagree with it being unhealthy.
 

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I don’t have any studies to back that up since I’ve never looked that far into, but I do know airlines don’t like to fly dogs between places with extreme temperature differences. I don have any real data on it.
I've flown a lot with dogs. The temperature regulations have to do with potential time on the runway between the plane and cargo terminal. They sit stationary for long periods sometimes due to aircraft movement. Blacktop plus sun equals high temps.
 
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So the 8 degrees between 75 and 67 is going to be detrimental to the health of the dog?

What about different climates?

If you're in Louisiana or Florida or Arizona or..., you can't take your dog outside?

I'm sorry but this makes no sense whatsoever. As long as the dog has adequate water and shade available, they will self regulate. Cooler indoor temps help dump core temperature.

Some dogs will be less likely to work in higher temperatures if they are accustomed to AC, but I totally disagree with it being unhealthy.
well, not exactly...
she did say extreme heat to extreme cold. i understood this to mean 60’s to 100’s, not 8 degrees.
i don’t have sources and i don’t know if unhealthy was the most accurate choice of words but we do instruct our clients to avoid frequent extreme temperature changes if possible and when unavoidable, allow a bit of time for the dog to acclimate (mainly cold to hot) before working. (“work” being subjective - speed, distance, duration, etc are all factors)
 

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I live in East TN. I think we only turned the AC on twice last year and maybe 10 times the year before. The dogs are used to the weather. I'm in the woods so almost everywhere is shaded. They have a kiddie pool outside and always plenty of water. I keep chill pads in the freezer I can wrap in a towel and put on the floor for them to lay on if they want. They have fans at night also. They do fine with it and still run around like nuts, lol! We also go swimming at the creek/river multiple times a week.

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