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hi guys, I’m new to this site. I was thinking about getting a GSD, but I already have 2 small female dogs. is it a good idea to get an almost newborn female GSD, or should I get a male?
 

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Before answering, how well do your little dogs get along with other dogs? What experience do you have with German shepherds? They are very different than raising a small dog. What line do you want? What do you plan to do with the dog? What kind of training?
 

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What do you mean by "an almost newborn"? Stay away from breeders who sell the pups before they are 8 weeks old. 9 - 10 weeks is even better. I wanted a GSD for decades and that's how long it took to find a good one. But that was before this forum. Please take the time to research the posts here before you jump into a GSD.
 

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What do you mean by "an almost newborn"? Stay away from breeders who sell the pups before they are 8 weeks old. 9 - 10 weeks is even better. I wanted a GSD for decades and that's how long it took to find a good one. But that was before this forum. Please take the time to research the posts here before you jump into a GSD.
hi, so it is not actually a breeder. my friend’s GSD is pregnant and he said he couldnt keep every pup, and since he knows me and my family well, he thought it was a good option in case a pup wasnt adopted.
 

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Before answering, how well do your little dogs get along with other dogs? What experience do you have with German shepherds? They are very different than raising a small dog. What line do you want? What do you plan to do with the dog? What kind of training?
both of them are super lovely and playful. I once had a bigger dog and all of them got along really well. I have never had any german shepherd, but for almost ten years I was neighbor to this guy that had three. it is supposed to be a companion dog and since I am at home most of the time I believe it would be okay, I know they need to be around their tutor. I didn’t make much research about training yet.
 

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Not to be mean, but I purposely try stay away from immature dogs. The GS we have now was mis-labeled by the shelter. To them, he was a 2 year old 90 lb male GS. But in reality he was - as the vet who looked in his mouth noted, 'MUCH younger'. Puppies and young dogs are a handful. Until they calm down its almost impossible to walk without them pulling you every which way. A mature dog generally likes to just walk along with you. You also have to deal with housebreaking a younger dog and with a GS that can take a year of random 'accidents'. That's a kind way of saying the dog is asserting dominance by showing you who is in charge of housebreaking. Little fluffy dogs are nice as pets but GS's are smart, smarter than you and they know it. We had one who made it very clear we were not walking him - he was showing off his human status symbol attached to him by a leash. I would advise you to adopt your first dog from a shelter and go for a mature dog. Start by visiting and meeting a variety of dogs. It will help you decide which dog is right for you. A shelter will ask you to bring any dogs you already have to make sure everyone gets along before allowing you to adopt. And don't shy away from a sweetheart because he's 6 years old or a lady who's 5 to 8 as ours have been. They are much better companions. It will also help you avoid medical problems that do not show up until the dog is full grown. You also have to consider the kinds of restrictions that come with a large, intelligent dog, for example, will you be able to provide an outdoor area with 6' fence? Perhaps if you told us a little more about the qualities you are seeking in a companion? And what kind of home you can offer?
 

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hi, so it is not actually a breeder. my friend’s GSD is pregnant and he said he couldnt keep every pup, and since he knows me and my family well, he thought it was a good option in case a pup wasnt adopted.
I don't want to be mean but someone who knows very little about the breed and a breeder who is a friend with a pregnant dog could be a recipe for disaster. GSD puppies are ROUGH! They don't play nice and are unlikely to be mindful of your small dogs. For an experienced person it could work fine. Inexperienced? Unlikely to end well.
And whether your friend is a breeder or not puppies belong with their moms for at least 8 weeks. This breed also has some not insignificant health issues and I doubt the parents have been screened for them.
If you really want a puppy then do your homework.
 

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I don't want to be mean but someone who knows very little about the breed and a breeder who is a friend with a pregnant dog could be a recipe for disaster. GSD puppies are ROUGH! They don't play nice and are unlikely to be mindful of your small dogs. For an experienced person it could work fine. Inexperienced? Unlikely to end well.
And whether your friend is a breeder or not puppies belong with their moms for at least 8 weeks. This breed also has some not insignificant health issues and I doubt the parents have been screened for them.
If you really want a puppy then do your homework.
you are definitely not mean! I want honest opinions because I don’t want to get into a situation where the dogs could be hurt. I will do more research and I just wanted to ask this forum because I thought it would be great to seek help from people that are experienced with GSD’s. thank you :D
 

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Not to be mean, but I purposely try stay away from immature dogs. The GS we have now was mis-labeled by the shelter. To them, he was a 2 year old 90 lb male GS. But in reality he was - as the vet who looked in his mouth noted, 'MUCH younger'. Puppies and young dogs are a handful. Until they calm down its almost impossible to walk without them pulling you every which way. A mature dog generally likes to just walk along with you. You also have to deal with housebreaking a younger dog and with a GS that can take a year of random 'accidents'. That's a kind way of saying the dog is asserting dominance by showing you who is in charge of housebreaking. Little fluffy dogs are nice as pets but GS's are smart, smarter than you and they know it. We had one who made it very clear we were not walking him - he was showing off his human status symbol attached to him by a leash. I would advise you to adopt your first dog from a shelter and go for a mature dog. Start by visiting and meeting a variety of dogs. It will help you decide which dog is right for you. A shelter will ask you to bring any dogs you already have to make sure everyone gets along before allowing you to adopt. And don't shy away from a sweetheart because he's 6 years old or a lady who's 5 to 8 as ours have been. They are much better companions. It will also help you avoid medical problems that do not show up until the dog is full grown. You also have to consider the kinds of restrictions that come with a large, intelligent dog, for example, will you be able to provide an outdoor area with 6' fence? Perhaps if you told us a little more about the qualities you are seeking in a companion? And what kind of home you can offer?
I would never ignore an older dog. Most of my gods were rescued by an older age (around 5 to 8 years) so I am very used to older dogs. The puppy thing is because of my friend’s GSD, she is pregnant and we were offered to take care of a puppy if they dont get adopted. anyways, we live in a big house with a really big outdoor area (a front and backyard). we already had some big dogs but not a GSD (actually, our last dog was a mix between a GSD and a non-breed), so I am definitely doing my best before going and adopting a german shepherd.
 

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you are definitely not mean! I want honest opinions because I don’t want to get into a situation where the dogs could be hurt. I will do more research and I just wanted to ask this forum because I thought it would be great to seek help from people that are experienced with GSD’s. thank you :D
If you stick around and ask questions there are a lot of really helpful people here who know GSD's. We have several members who came here to learn and plan for a future pup.
 

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Curious to know if your neighbor had a pregnant Lab or Poodle or Schnauzer, would you want one of those pups if you had the same offer? Do you just want a puppy, or do you specifically want a GSD and no other?
 

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I would never ignore an older dog. Most of my gods were rescued by an older age (around 5 to 8 years) so I am very used to older dogs. The puppy thing is because of my friend’s GSD, she is pregnant and we were offered to take care of a puppy if they dont get adopted. anyways, we live in a big house with a really big outdoor area (a front and backyard). we already had some big dogs but not a GSD (actually, our last dog was a mix between a GSD and a non-breed), so I am definitely doing my best before going and adopting a german shepherd.
This comment tells me that you are relying on the mixed breed puppy to have a GSD temperament and traits. What if the puppy you choose takes after the unknown sire's behavioral traits? A mixed breed puppy can also bring the worst traits from both sides.
 

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Not to be mean, but I purposely try stay away from immature dogs. The GS we have now was mis-labeled by the shelter. To them, he was a 2 year old 90 lb male GS. But in reality he was - as the vet who looked in his mouth noted, 'MUCH younger'. Puppies and young dogs are a handful. Until they calm down its almost impossible to walk without them pulling you every which way. A mature dog generally likes to just walk along with you. You also have to deal with housebreaking a younger dog and with a GS that can take a year of random 'accidents'. That's a kind way of saying the dog is asserting dominance by showing you who is in charge of housebreaking. Little fluffy dogs are nice as pets but GS's are smart, smarter than you and they know it. We had one who made it very clear we were not walking him - he was showing off his human status symbol attached to him by a leash. I would advise you to adopt your first dog from a shelter and go for a mature dog. Start by visiting and meeting a variety of dogs. It will help you decide which dog is right for you. A shelter will ask you to bring any dogs you already have to make sure everyone gets along before allowing you to adopt. And don't shy away from a sweetheart because he's 6 years old or a lady who's 5 to 8 as ours have been. They are much better companions. It will also help you avoid medical problems that do not show up until the dog is full grown. You also have to consider the kinds of restrictions that come with a large, intelligent dog, for example, will you be able to provide an outdoor area with 6' fence? Perhaps if you told us a little more about the qualities you are seeking in a companion? And what kind of home you can offer?
"You also have to deal with housebreaking a younger dog and with a GS that can take a year of random 'accidents'. That's a kind way of saying the dog is asserting dominance by showing you who is in charge of housebreaking."

Why a year of "random accidents"? All my 6 GSD have been fully housebroken by 3 months and zero accidents in the house or crate by then including my current 6 month old. And they're not crated during the day, which I wouldn't recommend for most actually.

And a 6' fence? Great for real security but I have no fence front or back and haven't had a dog go off the property by itself in 40 years ....GSD are awesome when trained properly but respectfully, 90% of owners don't understand the commitment that takes.
 

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Some are problematic when it comes to housebreaking. All our dogs have been shelter dogs and each comes with baggage. Sometimes they arrive housebroken, other times it's a long, tiring process. Duke has been a difficult 5 months. Over the weekend he lifted his leg on the shop vac and the dryer. Strange choices, I admit. The coyotes are not interested in either.
We were turned away at 2 shelters because we do not have a 6 foot fence. I agree, they are not always necessary and because we do not live with neighbors for us it seems silly, but some - shall we say 'controlling' - animal behaviorists believe all GS's need 6' fences. Frankly, I think they are in the wrong line of work. I don't think fences are all that important either. We have yet to have a dog run away. Lead us on a merry chase around the property - yes! but actually make a run for it - no. But it is something to consider, although some of us find the nicest companions at the shelter who were runaways.
 
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