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Discussion Starter #1
But I want to do my research first because I have heard they are prone to certian medical problems? I just love the bread, we had a corgi/shephard mix (we were told he was a husky/corgi mix but I don't think so) and he was the best dog ever, he passed away in oct 10. I want to do my research early cause right now I am in an apt and would not bring a gs into that lol. So just some questions were, what kind of medical problems if any are they prone to? Are they hard to train? And a wierd question, are they good with cats lol? Just any info I can get is awesome! Below is a picture of my dog Bowie who passed, I see alot more shephard than husky, but I could be wrong.

 

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Corgi is close to GSD. I see corgi.

Hip and elbow problems, easily upset stomach, bloating

Highly intelligent and can be easily trained

Most are high energy and needs lots of exercise

I thought the same thing about GSD as to apartments. I live in condo on second floor. Fiona does great. The breeder says GSD are fine in apartments or condos. Just have to take them out.

When thinking about getting from a breeder or shelter, think pros and cons. The expense, knowing parent's background and health, saving a dog from death, having a resource that know GSD really well.


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Welcome to the Forums!

Cheyanna is correct: Hip and Elbow problems can pop up, but you can reduce those chances by going to a reputable breeder who does OFA scores and allergies can also be a big thing with GSDs.

GSDs are easier to train than most breeds.

Apartments aren't bad for GSDs if you are willing to put in the time and energy to exercise them outside of the apartment. The only issue you might have is if the apartment will allow the dog; lots of apartments have gone the way of breed bans and our beloved GSD is usually at the top of the list next to "Bully Breeds" and Rotties. Our GSD grew up in a 900 sq. foot duplex and we had a 20'x15' yard that we split in half to share with our neighbor. He just got lots of walks and puppy park play time.
 

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I had two GSDs in an apartment for 2 years. No issues. They got a lot of exercise and did fine.

All my dogs have gotten along fine with our cats and those of various family members when we visit.

Easily trained. Very intelligent dogs. Need boundaries and rules from the start. Much happier. If they get bored, they're entertain themselves and it will very likely be something that wont be good for them (chewing things they shouldn't is one example) or getting into something.

Fun dogs.
 

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Thanks! And another reason I don't want to have one in an apt is cause I am not sure of my work schedule and would feel bad, when I move in nov I will be moving into a duplex that my mom is buying so she can doggy sit :) Plus my apt does not allow dogs lol. I want to rescue but then I don't really know the background and all that.
 

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Thanks! And another reason I don't want to have one in an apt is cause I am not sure of my work schedule and would feel bad, when I move in nov I will be moving into a duplex that my mom is buying so she can doggy sit :) Plus my apt does not allow dogs lol. I want to rescue but then I don't really know the background and all that.

If you rescue, I'd recommend finding a reputable rescue that has the dogs in fosters home for at least a month so they can give you a better idea of the dogs temperament and help find the best fit for you. Especially if you're concerned about how the dog will be with cats.

If you decide to buy, look for a reputable breeder. We can recommend good breeders to look into if you ask.
 

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One advantage of a puppy is that if raised with cats it will probably accept them. An adult dog is always an unknown regarding coexistence with other pets. That said, being experienced with cats, they are more problematic with accepting other pets then dogs are. The real question is if the above mentioned cats will accept a new dog into the household.
 

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One advantage of a puppy is that if raised with cats it will probably accept them. An adult dog is always an unknown regarding coexistence with other pets. That said, being experienced with cats, they are more problematic with accepting other pets then dogs are. The real question is if the above mentioned cats will accept a new dog into the household.
And that is one reason I want a puppy so he can grow up around Karma (my cat), but I know she will be fine because she has been around dogs before. I just like rescue not better but better, I don't know how to say it lol.. But that is how we got Bowie.
 
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