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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
You rehomed a dog you couldn't keep in the house with you which is part of caring for a dog- shelter. You seem like a good person who loves dogs, but come on even you aren't sure. The cons of you getting a dog right now are that you may or may not have stable housing in a year, your schooling schedule may become demanding, you still live at home, you don't have a stable career, and you already rehomed one dog recently because you couldn't house her. What are the pros for you other than cute companionship?
She had shelter. She just wasn't in the house with us, but she had shelter.
 

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When I was younger I worked full time and went to school nights. Then I quit work for a year to go to school full time. School was much easier than working 40 hours a week. A fulltime load at school is only 15 hours a week and then you do your studying.

I waited until I was 49 to get a dog because I traveled a lot and wanted a house for a dog.
 

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I'm not trying to make you defensive just trying to make you really think this out in a nice way. Why could the female dog not live inside? Why did you chose to rehome her? You said you rehomed her because she could not live in your home so obviously she or you weren't happy with her living outside. Will this new dog have to live as an outdoor only dog too? Are you living at home with your parents and if so is this a long term arrangement, will they keep your dog if your going to live at university, and if your going to be moving anytime in the next 10 years can you guarantee you can find and afford dog friendly housing? I couldn't own a dog until I owned a home. My ex and I had a pitbull and paid almost $100 extra a month in rent to keep him there. It was a pain financially though totally worth it, but it's something you have to consider. When we split he moved back home with his dad and took our dog with him since his dad was retired and I had a newborn to care for. It was a hard choice for me, but with a new baby, limited funds, and my job being shaky I knew he was better off there with someone home to care for him all day who was more stable than me. Over the next 2 years I began to work from home purchasing a town home of my own, finishing one degree, and beginning another. I was in a place where money was decent because of an inheritance I got that allowed me to pay my home off and had a stable job. This is when I got my lab 8 years ago this month. I was still in school like you, but had the time, money, and permanent housing.
 

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If you have already won the lottery and are independently wealthy and are going to school just to improve your knowledge, than I can understand getting a puppy now.

Otherwise, there is that possibility that you might have to move back in with the folks, and the dog will not be welcome, or only welcome to share the grass outside, and not allowed in.

Until you have been out there, paying all the bills, and managing a household, I think it is a bad idea to get a dog. I think it would be better for you to be settled.

Settled is married or single and sufficiently managing all the household expenses, it is not having a BF or GR who is working and helping out.

Settled is having a steady job that covers the basics without OT.

Settled is having a house or appartment where dogs are allowed.

Settled is being out of your parents' home for good barring some major tragic accident.

I agree with the others now, I think you should wait until you are more settled.
 

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I won't tell you what to do, but I don't think there's anything wrong with getting a pup. Sure your life might not be completely settled, BUT if you're willing/determined to live with your dog for the REST of your life then I don't see the problem. I got my own dog, not a family dog, when I was just 19. I didn't have a stable life at that point; I was attending JC and planning on transferring soon to a 4 year university at which point I had no idea what I would do as far as housing went. What I DID know was that I would not, for whatever reason, abandon or rehome my dog (it did help that she's a 10 lb dog though). Two years later and my life is still not 'settled', but I wouldn't go back and change my decision! My dog helped me more then anything. One thing I will point out though, is that ALL of your extra time will be spent with your pup. You won't have much of a social life. That wasn't a big deal for me, but it may be for you. If you want the all-round 'college experience' then you should seriously reconsider.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
I'm taking a break from thinking of whether or not I should get a GSD or not when I move.

It's a very tough decision and each choice has its pros and cons. I may get one when I move, I may not. I may just see how the first semester is and go there. Who knows. But I know one thing: this is stressing me out. When something stresses me out, I leave it alone.

When I'm ready to start thinking and considering again, I'll weigh what my parents said, what you guys said, what my siblings said, and what I think and look at how I managed with my last dog and going to school.

It's a lot of things to look at, but I'm taking a break. I really appreciate you guys' input and I'm sorry I got defensive.
 

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Why don't you consider doing foster care for a rescue group? It would allow you to have a dog, have help with the vet bills, and help a dog out. When you know you are going to be busy with school, etc., put the fostering on hold until you have enough time again. It could be a win/win situation for you, the rescue and the dogs.
 

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Don't get a dog until you are moved out and there's no chance of you moving back in. I think you should wait a year and see how you feel about the situation. You come across as inconsistent and impatient, no dog will benefit from that. You're young, you have a lot of years to live. A few years of waiting is nothing. I mean, you wouldn't have a baby in your situation, would you?

I got a dog at 18 while working full time and living at home(at some point I worked full time and did school full time, now I just do school). It 'worked out', I guess. But I HATE this situation so much. I've been constantly stressed for years. I had too high of expectations for this dog, and not enough time, patience, or knowledge to help him live up to those expectations.

Right now, I want to throw him outside and never look at him again. My dad killed a deer and there's bones in the backyard for Chrono, and he has been whining constantly for the last 6 hours all because he wants to eat them. You DO NOT want to bring a puppy into a household where you don't have full control of how he is trained and full control of his environment.
 
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