German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,300 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It's been a while since I decided not to get a dog, at least til I'm in a better situation. I think I'm doing good on controling my want for a dog since I've come this far.

But anyway, I just wanted to know what is the process of purchasing a puppy, particularly a German Shepherd puppy? Does it go something like this:

1. Research the breed. Find out if the breed is right for you.
2. If the breed fits what you look for in a dog, then find out what kind of GSD fits you. (The bloodlines)
3. Find a breeder that produces the bloodline and what you are looking for in a GSD.
4.Decide on a breeder and put a reserve down for a breeding that will produce what you are looking for.

Of course, I won't even look at getting a dog til I have more permanent and stable living arrangements and more income. Right now, when I go to MSU in the fall I will be living in the dorms. I'm not sure yet whether or not I'll be living in the dorms during vet school (if I make it).

When is it too early to start looking into getting a dog?

I'm trying my best to be patient, but I'm a little jealous of people who have dogs right now.

The girl with the wolf hybrid just got accepted to vet school and has two dogs, the wolf hybrid and a pit mix. I'm very jealous of her. Her grades are excellent and she was able to do it with not one, but two dogs. However, her situation is apparently different from mine and we're not the same person.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,725 Posts
I don't think it's too early to do your research. You can get as far along in your list as finding your breeder, and making contact. You can develop a relationship with the breeder, and when you are ready for a litter, the breeder will know you very well and be able to help you pick out your perfect match.

Keep on being patient. A long wait will only make getting your heart's desire that much sweeter.
 

·
Administrator & Alpha Bitch of the Wild Bunch
Joined
·
13,571 Posts
I think it's a very good step by step process, but when to contact breeders depends on how long #1 and #2 take. I remember in a previous thread where people were pointing out that proper research cannot be done via books and internet alone and requires getting out and meeting and interacting with the dogs, lots and lots of dogs, that you said this wasn't something that would be feasible in your current situation and might have to be put off a year or more.

There is no point in moving onto contacting breeders, or even knowing what breeders to contact, until you can determine if a GSD is even right for you, and then get a clear picture of what exactly you want in a dog. And that comes from the research. Until that research can be done properly, moving past step 2 is premature.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,124 Posts
Yeah, I can see how it would be hard to wait, but you have to think about the breeder also, who is kind of running a business, and needs to be placing current puppies. You can definately try to get to know one and see what kind of dogs they produce, but how do you know what breeding pair they are going to have 2-3 years from now. I don't even think breeders think that far in advance. Probably looking at lines, and studying pedigrees would be a good start just so that you can know later on what lines you want your dog to possess.
 

·
Administrator & Alpha Bitch of the Wild Bunch
Joined
·
13,571 Posts
The good ones do.
I guess I know a whole lot of bad breeders then. :shrug:

Yes, most good breeders have a long term breeding plan, and thus an idea of what direction they will head with the next litter and even next generation, and that will certainly include an idea of some specific bloodlines, and perhaps have them already investigating specific dogs.

But I don't know any breeder who can regularly say definitively "In spring of 2014 I will be breeding Bitch A to Dog B". And I don't think that's bad at all. It's called keeping options open. In the next 2-3 years anything could happen. Dog B might not even be alive, or fertile. Bitch A might not either. And that time could bring a more knowledge about Dog B and his production, good or bad, and Bitch A's production, good or bad, that would impact whether it would be the right match. Or Dog C might come on scene and offer even more to the breeding.

Keeping options open, keeping researching, and keeping evaluating production during that timeframe makes for much more educated breeding than trying to lay out a written in stone road map. A good breeder knows where they want to go and has a strong idea of the best way to get there, but isn't necessarily planning every single rest stop along the way years in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,132 Posts
I guess I know a whole lot of bad breeders then. :shrug:

Yes, most good breeders have a long term breeding plan, and thus an idea of what direction they will head with the next litter and even next generation, and that will certainly include an idea of some specific bloodlines, and perhaps have them already investigating specific dogs.

But I don't know any breeder who can regularly say definitively "In spring of 2014 I will be breeding Bitch A to Dog B". And I don't think that's bad at all. It's called keeping options open. In the next 2-3 years anything could happen. Dog B might not even be alive, or fertile. Bitch A might not either. And that time could bring a more knowledge about Dog B and his production, good or bad, and Bitch A's production, good or bad, that would impact whether it would be the right match. Or Dog C might come on scene and offer even more to the breeding.

Keeping options open, keeping researching, and keeping evaluating production during that timeframe makes for much more educated breeding than trying to lay out a written in stone road map. A good breeder knows where they want to go and has a strong idea of the best way to get there, but isn't planning every single reststop along the way years in advance.

I was referring more to a long-term breeding plan, as well as considering what dogs they want to purchase or import to add to their program. When Martinmchick said "breeders don't think that far in advance" I didn't want people getting the impression that dogs are being haphazardly thrown together. Individual matings may not be planned years in advance, but I would hope that the direction of the program is. And to me that's much more important when choosing a breeder than what specific dogs are being bred.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,834 Posts
GSD Fan when you start college in the fall there might be a dog park near campus. If there is spend some time there, you might run into some people with GSD's that you can talk to. If nothing else, you'll get more exposure to dogs in general.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,124 Posts
I was definately not talking about the direction of the program, but I know that a lot of people think about the actual breeding pair when they pick a pup so I just mentioned it. I guess Chris would be better at answering this question, but in my opinion, if I was a breeder, I wouldn't really want to be bothered by someone that isn't close to being ready to purchase a dog within the next year or so. Don't get me wrong, it would show initiative and the fact that you are going to be a good dog owner, but it would be like going to a car dealer and telling them you're going to buy a car in 2 years but you'd like them to spend time with you now talking about your different options. This person might end up being a customer down the line, but right now they aren't important, plus if you are a good, reputable, breeder, I'm sure you have no shortage of people that want your pups as soon as a breeding is announced. I know dogs aren't just thrown together, but in 2 years, the sire you wanted might not be used, and one of his pups will be, same with the bitch. That's why I said the line matters.

It was just my opinion, I know that I wouldn't want to be bothered by someone that's planning on purchasing so far down the line. And I guess a 5-10 minute conversation never hurt anyone, but is either party going to remember it when it comes time to purchase?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,300 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I think it's a very good step by step process, but when to contact breeders depends on how long #1 and #2 take. I remember in a previous thread where people were pointing out that proper research cannot be done via books and internet alone and requires getting out and meeting and interacting with the dogs, lots and lots of dogs, that you said this wasn't something that would be feasible in your current situation and might have to be put off a year or more.
:(

Sadly this is 100% true. Sure I'm going to volunteer at a vet clinic this summer and just might be able to volunteer at the shelter for a week, but as far as meeting purebred GSDs, that's out.

I just wanted to know the steps one should do to getting a GSD and I wanted to kinda voice my feelings about my wait.

But Chris Wild and everyone answered the question.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top