German Shepherds Forum banner

121 - 140 of 147 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,582 Posts
I gave him the tiniest little correction just to get him back close to my leg. This Car slammed on its brakes, women got out her car , blocking the road, screaming and shouting , traffic starting to back up.

It's stupid be a lot of people see corrections as dog abuse and act like but jobs. Seen it a few times.
SMH... honestly!! :mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,965 Posts
Your dog gets over aroused, lunges / bodyslams your female, and unloads his frustration on your female. This is self rewarding. It is a similar pattern to their offleash play. No wonder he is conflicted.

You need to stop him from becoming over aroused, look for what is the catalyst for his over arousal and change the environment to eliminate it. Is it pent up energy? Another dog? A jogger? Boredom? The leash?

Next you need to stop the behavior by teaching and reinforcing another or incompatible behavior, like a down, when he has been triggered. I would keep the other behavior simple, something easy to train. Set him up for success.

Lastly, you need to remove access to his reinforcer, your female dog, and replace it with a new reinforcer to his replacement behavior, (the down). Either have your girlfriend take the other dog home, walk behind you, or walk in another direction while you reinforce the other / incompatible behavior. This really doesn't need physical aversives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
561 Posts
Your dog gets over aroused, lunges / bodyslams your female, and unloads his frustration on your female. This is self rewarding. It is a similar pattern to their offleash play. No wonder he is conflicted.

You need to stop him from becoming over aroused, look for what is the catalyst for his over arousal and change the environment to eliminate it. Is it pent up energy? Another dog? A jogger? Boredom? The leash?

Next you need to stop the behavior by teaching and reinforcing another or incompatible behavior, like a down, when he has been triggered. I would keep the other behavior simple, something easy to train. Set him up for success.

Lastly, you need to remove access to his reinforcer, your female dog, and replace it with a new reinforcer to his replacement behavior, (the down). Either have your girlfriend take the other dog home, walk behind you, or walk in another direction while you reinforce the other / incompatible behavior. This really doesn't need physical aversives.
Well stated plan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
IT sounds like he is putting both YOU and the other dog at risk of serious injury when he does this, so why SHOULDN' there be consequences?? You want to wait until you or the other dog gets seriously bitten??

The all-positive mindset REALLY makes me shake my head sometimes! If this were my dog, he'd be left with NO doubt in his mind whatsoever that he messed up BIG TIME!

There HAVE to be consequences sometimes. Look at it this way: someone's kid is about to hit your kid over the head with a stick. You don't just offer them some candy! You take the stick away, and tell them off!
shock collar then might help? he needs Cesar Milan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #125 (Edited)
Lots of things to think about and I've got a decent idea what I should be doing moving forward.

I do think what what's been suggested, that I need to build more enthusiasm towards me is correct. I have struggled to find that thing that makes him super enthusiastic playing with me . I previously said I needed to find how to excite him , increase drive, when I said that I was referred having excitement for play with me.

What happened is I couldn't find anything he loved doing , so I assumed he wasn't interested / is a calm dog. Also either dog will whine and cry if I give the other a lot of individual play and attention. So in the house I've not been doing it as much as I should.

So excited play with me has definitely been neglected, I suppose our relationship is a bit like to him "do this, this and this" . It's possible it could be the cause of the habit of using Evie as an outlet to let off steam.

So definitely something I'm going to work on. I'm going to really work on developing a tug/play and trying to avoid him getting type of fun from Evie. Also as suggested it's probably a good idea to cut back on constantly trying to teach obedience (quality over quantity as suggested) . So yeah I've probably been really boring .

Also as suggested a fresh start may be good, Even if it's just for me. So I might buy that book mentioned by workingline , or consider any other structured programs to follow. Everyone's thoughts on books/video courses, and a list of recommendations please?



As with offleash stuff with Evie . It was suggested to keep him on leash while she's off or put him on leash and remove him from her if things get out of hand. I don't feel like this is the solution , the reason being is if he can't get to Evie or he's removed from ever Finn gets 100 times worse. He goes from hard to control to completely uncontrollable, it's a pretty dangrous state for him to be in.

As for being off leash with Evie not decided if I should stop it or not, they have to be either on leash together or offleash together (at the moment) . He will slam into her BUT he does have a good recall and I can call him back in mid chase and he immediately comes back in to sit and he's immediately calm. This excited behaviour is unique to Evie and NOT other dogs , in the presents of other dogs on/off leash, he's always calm , listens and never rough , he's actually really polite.

This is definitely not the solution but it may help understand why he's doing it. What completely cuts off his excited behaviour around Evie is him having a ball, he doesn't need to be playing with the ball just have one.

When he has a ball his excitement towards Evie instantly shuts off . If he's holding a ball on a walk or has a ball off leash the behaviour will not happen. Zero rough play, no jumping on her, no pulling towards her, no chasing, no lunging. The bad behaviour is completely illuminated.

I posted a few the videos with him on and off leash with a ball to show this . You can see he's calm when he has it . Always having a ball is definitely NOT the solution but I think it's key to understanding his bad behaviour. Why can a ball completely shut down his bad behaviour and prevent it taking place in the first place?

Should I continue to keep using a ball to manage his bad behaviour and prevent it from happening until I make enough progress to fix the issue, get to a point I don't need it to mange?

I can't decide what's best as the problem. Use it or not. When he has a ball he's not interested in Evie and he won't carry out bad behaviour but the negative is when he has a ball he isn't focused on me either.

As for managing him while he looses it . At some point along the line I'm going to screw up and I'm probably going to be in the situation where he looses it again.

I need certainly how to deal with it. I need a way to snap him out of it and regain control. I've lost a lot of confidence in my ability to deal with him in these situations. When he's, pulling , lunging , braking , trying to get to Evie to attack her, I need absolute clarity on exactly what I should do.

Right now I'm conflicted / unsure about what to do. I think being able to deal with the situation effectively will boost my confidence about dealing with him a lot. I think it will be a huge step for us .

As it stands removing him from Evie in this situation makes it 100 times worse (he goes mental), half assed corrections and him choking himself trying to get to her is probably aggravating and amping him up and making him worse.

So yeah I desperately need clarity on exactly what I need to do when it happens .

A video, description, or whatever.

I'm not against harsh corrections and will do them if it's honestly what's best for him, but I need to see exactly what it looks like and I need to be absolutely certain it's nessesary.


Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,965 Posts
1) You don't want to create excitement in this dog. He's a pet. Calm is good.

2) Pick one plan and stick to it. Picking bits and pieces from different advice and trying to meld those pieces together is only setting your dog up for failure. There is a reason that things are done and in what particular order.

3) Try off leash hiking with your male dog only. NO OBEDIENCE. You may want to try a little Nosework with him.

4) I hope you didn't come to this forum looking for support and encouragement for using physical aversives and a guide on how to do it. If you did, you just wasted a lot of people's time and set the groundwork in the future for a cacophony of 20 posts saying hire a trainer with no advice given for the next person that comes here looking for help. The problem you presented is not a dog problem. It's an owner problem and there won't be any effective or long term results by using physical aversives on the dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,582 Posts
It's possible it could be the cause of the habit of using Evie as an outlet to let off steam.
Yes, I think that's quite possible. And I think the ball calming him down may show he uses playing ball with you to let off steam. Maybe even just holding it makes him think he's going to get to play?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #128 (Edited)
"1) You don't want to create excitement in this dog. He's a pet. Calm is good."

It was pointed out my dog has no enthusiasm for playing or paying attention with me. It was suggested to really get into games like tug to build that enthusiasm with playful interaction .

So you don't believe building his enthusiasm for playing with me is not helpful . So I should be just focusing on calm?

2) Pick one plan and stick to it. Picking bits and pieces from different advice and trying to meld those pieces together is only setting your dog up for failure. There is a reason that things are done and in what particular order.

I'm trying to find a plan that will work.

Lots of conflicting information and it's hard to be sure or exactly which advice to follow . I've not put anything into action yet.

I'm simply trying to formulate a plan with the information presented to me . It's the reason I asked opinions on book/video course recommendations.

You're right I do need a certain plan to follow in a particular order. At the moment it's all about finding that plan.

3) Try off leash hiking with your male dog only. NO OBEDIENCE. You may want to try a little Nosework with him.

Yes that's a great idea. We do that quite often , the hiking but not the nose work.

Maybe I should do more as I know my dog enjoys it more than traveling to the city for walks. The main reason I've been going to the city is to get him comfortable in different environments.

4) I hope you didn't come to this forum looking for support and encouragement for using physical aversives and a guide on how to do it. If you did, you just wasted a lot of people's time and set the groundwork in the future for a cacophony of 20 posts saying hire a trainer with no advice given for the next person that comes here looking for help. The problem you presented is not a dog problem. It's an owner problem and there won't be any effective or long term results by using physical aversives on the dog.


Definitely not. It's just been suggested my corrections are not harsh enough.

It's doesn't happen often but it can happen. I find myself in a situation where Finn is on the leash wanting to hurt Evie. It might not be true aggression but he is going to hurt her if not stopped.

It's impossible to remove him from the situation as it amps him up and he gets much worse. He then becomes a danger to himself .

Please give you your opinion on what I need to do in this situation to keep both dogs safe . Telling me what not to do isn't helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #129
Yes, I think that's quite possible. And I think the ball calming him down may show he uses playing ball with you to let off steam. Maybe even just holding it makes him think he's going to get to play?
It's a weird one. He's not even excited about have the ball.

It's like a pacifier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,582 Posts
I find myself in a situation where Finn is on the leash wanting to hurt Evie. It might not be true aggression but he is going to hurt her if not stopped.

It's impossible to remove him from the situation as it amps him up and he gets much worse. He then becomes a danger to himself .

Please give you your opinion on what I need to do in this situation to keep both dogs safe . Telling me what not to do isn't helpful.
If you don't want to go the aversive route, WL's solution about having him lie down when he goes after Evie sounds like a good one. A dog should be in a calmer frame of mind when lying down. I would keep him in the down until he calms. Go back and watch the video David posted, where the dog is just out of its mind when it sees another dog, but eventually calms. I've been in training situations like that, where BOTH dogs were dog-reactive, and by the end of the class, the trainer had them lying in a down about 8 feet apart!

My dog was the better of the two, as I'd already done a lot of work with her with the 'look at me' exercise I described previously.

The other solution is to just stop walking them together. He's become fixated on Evie as his source of entertainment, and that's got to stop. He should not be body-slamming her when they are playing off leash, either.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,557 Posts
Here's what I would do if the dogs were here with me.

I would put a slip lead on Finn and work leash pressure until he respected the leash. No movement, just standing still. No commands. Just leash pressure. I would add Evie and work closer to her using just leash pressure and social pressure. When that is successful, we would go for a walk. Same techniques. Respect the leash and maintain sanity.

The other work, without Evie present, would be tug. The dog needs to learn impulse control and that's not going to happen practicing calm. He doesn't have a calm problem, he has an impulse control problem. OB in drive is the only way I see to actually address the issue that will stick. The dog needs to learn when it is appropriate to be in that state of mind. I don't believe that going for a hike is going to satisfy his need to get amped up and wrestle. He needs to learn to control himself or he will be controlled. The outlet happens after compliance.

Then I would practice OB and impulse control in the walk situation after a long tug session.


I have absolutely no idea how to explain these steps to someone over the internet. The learning curve is steep.


This is just my opinion and many other approaches may be better than mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,965 Posts
"1) You don't want to create excitement in this dog. He's a pet. Calm is good."

It was pointed out my dog has no enthusiasm for playing or paying attention with me. It was suggested to really get into games like tug to build that enthusiasm with playful interaction .

So you don't believe building his enthusiasm for playing with me is not helpful . So I should be just focusing on calm?

2) Pick one plan and stick to it. Picking bits and pieces from different advice and trying to meld those pieces together is only setting your dog up for failure. There is a reason that things are done and in what particular order.

I'm trying to find a plan that will work.

Lots of conflicting information and it's hard to be sure or exactly which advice to follow . I've not put anything into action yet.

I'm simply trying to formulate a plan with the information presented to me . It's the reason I asked opinions on book/video course recommendations.

You're right I do need a certain plan to follow in a particular order. At the moment it's all about finding that plan.

3) Try off leash hiking with your male dog only. NO OBEDIENCE. You may want to try a little Nosework with him.

Yes that's a great idea. We do that quite often , the hiking but not the nose work.

Maybe I should do more as I know my dog enjoys it more than traveling to the city for walks. The main reason I've been going to the city is to get him comfortable in different environments.

4) I hope you didn't come to this forum looking for support and encouragement for using physical aversives and a guide on how to do it. If you did, you just wasted a lot of people's time and set the groundwork in the future for a cacophony of 20 posts saying hire a trainer with no advice given for the next person that comes here looking for help. The problem you presented is not a dog problem. It's an owner problem and there won't be any effective or long term results by using physical aversives on the dog.


Definitely not. It's just been suggested my corrections are not harsh enough.

It's doesn't happen often but it can happen. I find myself in a situation where Finn is on the leash wanting to hurt Evie. It might not be true aggression but he is going to hurt her if not stopped.

It's impossible to remove him from the situation as it amps him up and he gets much worse. He then becomes a danger to himself .

Please give you your opinion on what I need to do in this situation to keep both dogs safe . Telling me what not to do isn't helpful.
1) You are here because of your dog's unruly behavior. You do not need to teach excitement to create calm behavior. It's counterproductive. I will give you major kudos for when you played ball freely with your dog to take the edge off (create calm) in order to teach calm (sit and wait to fetch the ball). THIS IS WHAT IT IS ALL ABOUT!
When you start creating excitement and building drive, you are opening a whole other can of worms. I see nothing whatsoever concerning in any of the videos that you posted or in anything that you have said. I see your dog as a nice, calm, softer pup. That's a bonus! Work with it! Don't create something that you are ill prepared to handle. Remember, you are having major issues with a soft puppy. Why would you want to ramp him up? Just a sneaking suspicion but I think when your puppy acts out, deep down inside I am speculating that either you or your SO don't trust your ability to handle him especially if this escalates with age or maybe you fear that this puppy may redirect to yourselves. I could be wrong but I do see an over concern with this minor behavior.

2) Just stop. You are here because you have failed at formulating a plan that works. Pick advice from people who are experienced AND successful with their dogs that use training methods that align with training methods that you prefer.

3) You don't even realize how many tools you have at your disposal but are failing to make use of them. "It was pointed out my dog has no enthusiasm for playing or paying attention with me." "Maybe I should do more as I know my dog enjoys it more than traveling to the city for walks." The latter is known as adventure training. It is one of the best foundational bond builders. DO IT!!! Just you and him. Don't have to do it all of the time or for long periods of time. Once a week for an hour or two should help you build a powerful bond full of engagement.

4) ALWAYS start with the least aversive method possible and work your way up. You have been given plenty of advice for aversion free solutions. Pick one method and apply it. It will take time and commitment on your part. I think I gave a fairly detailed outline of what I would do in a prior post. If you have questions or need more specifics, please ask. I don't believe I suggested removing him from a situation but removing your female dog. More importantly, what do you mean that he amps up and "is a danger to himself"? Why are you relinquishing your control of this puppy to him? He doesn't call the shots. You do. His life depends on YOU taking control of the situation. Out of curiosity, does your sliplead have a tab on it? Just where is it positioned on his neck?

Most importantly, have a clear picture of what exactly is the terminal response that you hope to achieve. Is it realistic? Keep coming back and adjusting this picture if necessary as you progress. Be willing to put in time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #133
1) You are here because of your dog's unruly behavior. You do not need to teach excitement to create calm behavior. It's counterproductive. I will give you major kudos for when you played ball freely with your dog to take the edge off (create calm) in order to teach calm (sit and wait to fetch the ball). THIS IS WHAT IT IS ALL ABOUT!
When you start creating excitement and building drive, you are opening a whole other can of worms. I see nothing whatsoever concerning in any of the videos that you posted or in anything that you have said. I see your dog as a nice, calm, softer pup. That's a bonus! Work with it! Don't create something that you are ill prepared to handle. Remember, you are having major issues with a soft puppy. Why would you want to ramp him up? Just a sneaking suspicion but I think when your puppy acts out, deep down inside I am speculating that either you or your SO don't trust your ability to handle him especially if this escalates with age or maybe you fear that this puppy may redirect to yourselves. I could be wrong but I do see an over concern with this minor behavior.

2) Just stop. You are here because you have failed at formulating a plan that works. Pick advice from people who are experienced AND successful with their dogs that use training methods that align with training methods that you prefer.

3) You don't even realize how many tools you have at your disposal but are failing to make use of them. "It was pointed out my dog has no enthusiasm for playing or paying attention with me." "Maybe I should do more as I know my dog enjoys it more than traveling to the city for walks." The latter is known as adventure training. It is one of the best foundational bond builders. DO IT!!! Just you and him. Don't have to do it all of the time or for long periods of time. Once a week for an hour or two should help you build a powerful bond full of engagement.

4) ALWAYS start with the least aversive method possible and work your way up. You have been given plenty of advice for aversion free solutions. Pick one method and apply it. It will take time and commitment on your part. I think I gave a fairly detailed outline of what I would do in a prior post. If you have questions or need more specifics, please ask. I don't believe I suggested removing him from a situation but removing your female dog. More importantly, what do you mean that he amps up and "is a danger to himself"? Why are you relinquishing your control of this puppy to him? He doesn't call the shots. You do. His life depends on YOU taking control of the situation. Out of curiosity, does your sliplead have a tab on it? Just where is it positioned on his neck?

Most importantly, have a clear picture of what exactly is the terminal response that you hope to achieve. Is it realistic? Keep coming back and adjusting this picture if necessary as you progress. Be willing to put in time.
1) You are here because of your dog's unruly behavior. You do not need to teach excitement to create calm behavior. It's counterproductive. I will give you major kudos for when you played ball freely with your dog to take the edge off (create calm) in order to teach calm (sit and wait to fetch the ball). THIS IS WHAT IT IS ALL ABOUT!
When you start creating excitement and building drive, you are opening a whole other can of worms. I see nothing whatsoever concerning in any of the videos that you posted or in anything that you have said. I see your dog as a nice, calm, softer pup. That's a bonus! Work with it! Don't create something that you are ill prepared to handle. Remember, you are having major issues with a soft puppy. Why would you want to ramp him up? Just a sneaking suspicion but I think when your puppy acts out, deep down inside I am speculating that either you or your SO don't trust your ability to handle him especially if this escalates with age or maybe you fear that this puppy may redirect to yourselves. I could be wrong but I do see an over concern with this minor behavior.



This is exactly what I mean by amping him, getting his drive up and leaning how to control and calm him. Below is an example of me introducing this.

"I will give you major kudos for when you played ball freely with your dog to take the edge off (create calm) in order to teach calm (sit and wait to fetch the ball). THIS IS WHAT IT IS ALL ABOUT! "

I got him all amped up, full of drive and excitement for retrieving the ball. Then I introduced calm and control. Instead of him acting like a maniac, he had to sit , stay and then go.

Would this over time not build impulse control ? Get him all amped up and excited , get him good at holding that that excitement , for example while in a sit or down . Then release him to focus that built up energy in say a ball/tug.

Would it not transfer over to Evie? If he learns impulse control when really excited
and amped up in games and learns to steady and what to be released .


2) Just stop. You are here because you have failed at formulating a plan that works. Pick advice from people who are experienced AND successful with their dogs that use training methods that align with training methods that you prefer.

What I mean is I'm deciding who's advise to follow and need a plan to follow that advise.

3) You don't even realize how many tools you have at your disposal but are failing to make use of them. "It was pointed out my dog has no enthusiasm for playing or paying attention with me." "Maybe I should do more as I know my dog enjoys it more than traveling to the city for walks." The latter is known as adventure training. It is one of the best foundational bond builders. DO IT!!! Just you and him. Don't have to do it all of the time or for long periods of time. Once a week for an hour or two should help you build a powerful bond full of engagement.

I live in he county side. So Finn regularly has these walks off leash. At a guess probably for an hour around 5 times a week , coupled with these "adventure" walks he has at least one structured walk each day with a goal in mind , cities. Challenging environments e.t.c. So the two daily walks are just me and Finn.

3rd and Final walk will be a joint walk with Evie.


4) ALWAYS start with the least aversive method possible and work your way up. You have been given plenty of advice for aversion free solutions. Pick one method and apply it. It will take time and commitment on your part. I think I gave a fairly detailed outline of what I would do in a prior post. If you have questions or need more specifics, please ask. I don't believe I suggested removing him from a situation but removing your female dog. More importantly, what do you mean that he amps up and "is a danger to himself"? Why are you relinquishing your control of this puppy to him? He doesn't call the shots. You do. His life depends on YOU taking control of the situation. Out of curiosity, does your sliplead have a tab on it? Just where is it positioned on his neck?

I completely agree with this statement and it's what I do...

"ALWAYS start with the least aversive method possible and work your way up. "

As for removing Evie , it's s massive trigger and it will amp him up into the worst state possible. There is nothing that will trigger him as much as this.






Most importantly, have a clear picture of what exactly is the terminal response that you hope to achieve. Is it realistic? Keep coming back and adjusting this picture if necessary as you progress. Be willing to put in time.

Finn is pretty much where I want him at the moment. He's great apart from one thing my other dog . He needs to learn to turn off his excitement when he's on a walk with Evie or redirect at something appropriate, balls, games , whatever.

My only expection at the moment is for Finn to treat my own dog with the same respect he treats other dogs out and about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #134 (Edited)
Here's what I would do if the dogs were here with me.

I would put a slip lead on Finn and work leash pressure until he respected the leash. No movement, just standing still. No commands. Just leash pressure. I would add Evie and work closer to her using just leash pressure and social pressure. When that is successful, we would go for a walk. Same techniques. Respect the leash and maintain sanity.

The other work, without Evie present, would be tug. The dog needs to learn impulse control and that's not going to happen practicing calm. He doesn't have a calm problem, he has an impulse control problem. OB in drive is the only way I see to actually address the issue that will stick. The dog needs to learn when it is appropriate to be in that state of mind. I don't believe that going for a hike is going to satisfy his need to get amped up and wrestle. He needs to learn to control himself or he will be controlled. The outlet happens after compliance.

Then I would practice OB and impulse control in the walk situation after a long tug session.


I have absolutely no idea how to explain these steps to someone over the internet. The learning curve is steep.


This is just my opinion and many other approaches may be better than mine.
I feel this will work with Finn.

For the time being it's just about managing Finn when he's in that state .

I think the key to solving this is, as you said is learning impulse control. When he's excited and slowly building it up.

Lots of learning to do and finding a resource with clear steps to follow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #135 (Edited)
If you don't want to go the aversive route, WL's solution about having him lie down when he goes after Evie sounds like a good one. A dog should be in a calmer frame of mind when lying down. I would keep him in the down until he calms. Go back and watch the video David posted, where the dog is just out of its mind when it sees another dog, but eventually calms. I've been in training situations like that, where BOTH dogs were dog-reactive, and by the end of the class, the trainer had them lying in a down about 8 feet apart!

My dog was the better of the two, as I'd already done a lot of work with her with the 'look at me' exercise I described previously.

The other solution is to just stop walking them together. He's become fixated on Evie as his source of entertainment, and that's got to stop. He should not be body-slamming her when they are playing off leash, either.

Thanks. I would love to be able to be able to put him in a down when he's getting amped up and have him to be able to control his impulses and calm .

I think it will probably solve the issue completely. I just I need knowledge how to build upto this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,965 Posts
This is all well and good. David Winners is the best of the best and you can't go wrong taking his advice.

I think you have made some good decisions but let me suggest something. Take him somewhere new and exciting for his adventure training, different parks and different trails. Monotony is boring and comes at a price of disengagement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #137
This is all well and good. David Winners is the best of the best and you can't go wrong taking his advice.

I think you have made some good decisions but let me suggest something. Take him somewhere new and exciting for his adventure training, different parks and different trails. Monotony is boring and comes at a price of disengagement.

Of course, I live in Scotland. I have an no shortage of new and wonderful places to explore around me.

Although most days i stay local as I don't like taking one dog out much than an hour and a half. I always feel guilty about that , when I have one dog home alone. .

It's not really an issue are lots to places to go to that's within s 15 to 20 min drive.

I can't wait until the problem gets better and me and the two dogs can explore the whole of Scotland together. Will be great not having time constraints and not constantly watching the clock, thinking it's time to get home for the other dog.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,557 Posts
I will look for some decent video resources. I wish I had a dog here with these issues right now to shoot some video.

Best of the best is a heck of a stretch there MAWL.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Loki.777

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #139
I will look for some decent video resources. I wish I had a dog here with these issues right now to shoot some video.

Best of the best is a heck of a stretch there MAWL.
Haha take mine !!!

Thank you , any resources and a point in the right direction would be great.

So have I've got, power of tug , the videos you and others have recommended and I'm also really interested in the book MAWL suggested .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,965 Posts
I will look for some decent video resources. I wish I had a dog here with these issues right now to shoot some video.

Best of the best is a heck of a stretch there MAWL.
David, if I ever get stumped, you would be one of my first go-to people if the small potatoes can't figure it out. Besides, I am still planning on sending the boy to you so that you can teach him those forward somersaults. 😁

Screenshot_20200822-142810_Chrome.jpg
 
121 - 140 of 147 Posts
Top