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My 11 week old puppy is a smart fellow but he doesn't seem to respond to NO! I read an article on leerburg about teaching command No and it recommended me to pull the skin of my puppies neck until they scream "This requires a shaking that is strong enough to put him into avoidance. His scream should have some fear in it." Now my pup screamed and avoided me. When I caught him chewing the carpet, I gave a loud NO! and the pup growled and barked at me. I know this is my fault but I went closer to the challenging pup and he bit me hard on the finger that I had to smack him away or I would have lose a nail. After that I realized I made a big mistake following that article and now I want to regain back my boy's trust. I played with him for a little bit with a bone and he still follows me when I get up and move but I still know he has the unsure feeling with me. How can I quickly regain my boy's trust ASAP? I hope the members on the board forgive me aswell. :headbang:
 

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We've all messed up; you know what you've done wrong, so don't beat yourself up about it. Best way to regain trust/build a bond, is just to do stuff with them. Things that engage them in you (play sessions, training sessions) work really well. I know he's a baby but it's never too early to work stuff like, "watch me" or "sit" short training sessions many times a day with lots of yummy treats, and only positive attention (ignore your pup's mistakes until he's older and you know he really knows what you are asking) will get you back on track in no time.
 

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Welcome to you!

Change your method now and quit fighting with your puppy.
Engage him,play tug~use a flirtpole, fetch. Praise him when you see him doing wonderful behaviors. Carry treats, and use a clicker. Do some perchwork to occupy his mind so he's not all into biting, but thinking of what to do next for you.
Don't fret over what happened, just move on and keep pup busy.
Look at Michael Ellis's free clips on engagment and others( a few pages of free clips)
http://leerburg.com/flix/newvideos.php
Bowwowflix has many training video's available too, for a small monthly fee, worth every penny.
Get into a good group training class now too, if you haven't already.
 

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We've all messed up; you know what you've done wrong, so don't beat yourself up about it. Best way to regain trust/build a bond, is just to do stuff with them. Things that engage them in you (play sessions, training sessions) work really well. I know he's a baby but it's never too early to work stuff like, "watch me" or "sit" short training sessions many times a day with lots of yummy treats, and only positive attention (ignore your pup's mistakes until he's older and you know he really knows what you are asking) will get you back on track in no time.
Exactly
He is 11 weeks old for cryin out loud.
 

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My 11 week old puppy is a smart fellow but he doesn't seem to respond to NO! I read an article on leerburg about teaching command No and it recommended me to pull the skin of my puppies neck until they scream "This requires a shaking that is strong enough to put him into avoidance. His scream should have some fear in it." Now my pup screamed and avoided me. When I caught him chewing the carpet, I gave a loud NO! and the pup growled and barked at me. I know this is my fault but I went closer to the challenging pup and he bit me hard on the finger that I had to smack him away or I would have lose a nail. After that I realized I made a big mistake following that article and now I want to regain back my boy's trust. I played with him for a little bit with a bone and he still follows me when I get up and move but I still know he has the unsure feeling with me. How can I quickly regain my boy's trust ASAP? I hope the members on the board forgive me aswell. :headbang:
Mmm! Several different things going on here. Sounds like you're explaining the "scruff shake." What had your pup done to merit that? (Note that I'm not against a scruff necessarily, but it so depends on what they're getting it for and an 11 week old, IMHO, doesn't often merit that just yet.)

Don't let your feeling guilty allow bad behavior, though. Biting you that hard is unacceptable. Did he do so out of fear, (I assume?)

He didn't quit loving you for this. :D He still does. Consistency is key. When he chews the carpet again, be firm -- NO! NO CHEW! Redirect to a toy, praise... and spray some Bitter Apple on the carpet.

Gain control now, before he's 75 lbs. Again, don't let guilt guide you. You are the owner and master and this guy has to learn the rules.!

Good luck!
 

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I think it's really really really important to consider the target audience of Leerburg's stuff. What might be appropriate for someone raising a solid-nerved, strong-willed, self-confident, pushy pup that's supposed to be a future world Schutzhund competitor, can really cause some damage if you have a weaker-nerved or softer "pet-type" puppy.
 

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And then....is it necessary with a strong pup? They may withstand it better than some, but still. I never felt inclined to do such even to a solid little son of gun! I am not sure about the advice in general.
 

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First, why were you not watching your pup so that he didn't have a chance to chew on the carpet? At 11 weeks, a pup needs to be in a crate or in training (which at this age includes much play).

An 11 week puppy can chew on electrical wires, ingest toys, and other things that can cause much damage or death. Crating when not being watched is for the puppies own good.

A nose pinch usually works to stop a puppy from clamping down, but its best to have many different toys placed out of the puppies reach so that when the puppy is doing something you don't like, a toy can be offered.

A scruff shake is a mama dog's way of stopping on of her pups.... they understand this launguage, but one must not overdo it.
 

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The advice is fine if you know how to apply it and when. But i'm wondering how far you had to dig to find that. Don't blame Leerburg website for something you don't understand. There's thousands of other articles and free videos that are as current as any you'll find in the dog training world.

maybe reading a few or watching some more before shaking your dog for something that has 50 options of how to stop or control, most of which are written about on the Leerburg site as well, will allow you to be better prepared the next time something comes up you need to deal with.
 

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There's no reason to have to correct a puppy that is that young, and it's not just my opinion. If you can't keep him out of situations where he will be naughty, then just call him to you when he starts chewing on something, or whatever. I've never had a puppy not come running over when he hears his name for some love or maybe even a cookie.

Corrections come in when the dog knows a command and refuses to obey. That is far in the future.
 

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I think it's really really really important to consider the target audience of Leerburg's stuff. What might be appropriate for someone raising a solid-nerved, strong-willed, self-confident, pushy pup that's supposed to be a future world Schutzhund competitor, can really cause some damage if you have a weaker-nerved or softer "pet-type" puppy.
I totally agree and would like to add:

If you read more of the leerburg articles and watch some of the free streaming videos, you will hear Ed talk about how his methods have changed. He no longer recommends some of the things the articles outline, and they are not really meant for the average pet.

I would do as another poster mentioned and check out the Micheal Ellis videos - they are amazing! Your pup sounds like an average pet pup, so he may not require the harder corrections.

When we talk about correction, I always say you use the least amount of correction necessary to achieve the result.

However, for an 11 week old pup, the only thing I would do is manage the environment, making corrections unneccesary. Everything training wise should be done through positive reinforcement marker training and play.
 

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Start teaching your pup a strong leave it command. Plain and simple. Larger treat on one hand, make sure your pup knows its there. HE NEVER GETS THE LARGE LEAVE IT TREAT!!! He's naturally going to go for the treat so you close your fist around it, tell him to leave it. Only say the command once. If he keeps trying to get the treat, you say his name, make funny noises at him, blow at him and ignoring the pawing, chewing on your hand, licking, barking, whatever he throws out at your hand to get the leave it treat. Again you never repeat the command. Command is said once. When your pup backs off from the leave it hand and LOOKS AT YOU MAKING EYE CONTACT!!! You say yes and reward from THE OTHER HAND!!! Never ever ever reward with the leave it treat because that tells him that he has to leave it alone because he'll get it anyway. Practice a few minutes a day several times a day with the leave it command as well as others.
 
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