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Kim, the term "Cajun Navy" actually was spawned during Katrina. That's when these guys first popped up during a disaster in modern times. When the city was closed and civilians weren't allowed into New Orleans, these guys in fishing boats found back ways in with their boats to pull people off roof tops. Many, many people are alive because of them. They're the same guys who saved thousands of lives during the massive floods of South Louisiana last year. You may not have heard of them before Houston, but they're part of the fabric of Louisiana -- they're "regular guys" who just show up when needed, organizing using social media. They've inspired a lot of others -- there are hundreds of people from other states who are on the way, posting on pages like "Louisiana Cajun Navy" asking for the staging area and Zello channel in order to stay in communication -- they've got a surprisingly sophisticated Internet comm systems in place, with a huge number of volunteers working from home. They even have a dispatch channel on Zello.

As for using the full military in domestic operations (other than the Coast Guard and National Guard), it's worth reading some of the history of the the Posse Comitatus Act (a post-Civil War statute), which was passed to limit the powers of the President to use the military domestically against our own citizens -- though there are some exceptions (including disasters) now:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posse_Comitatus_Act
 

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Kim, the term "Cajun Navy" actually was spawned during Katrina. That's when these guys first popped up during a disaster in modern times. When the city was closed and civilians weren't allowed into New Orleans, these guys in fishing boats found back ways in with their boats to pull people off roof tops. Many, many people are alive because of them. They're the same guys who saved thousands of lives during the massive floods of South Louisiana last year. You may not have heard of them before Houston, but they're part of the fabric of Louisiana -- they're "regular guys" who just show up when needed, organizing using social media. They've inspired a lot of others -- there are hundreds of people from other states who are on the way, posting on pages like "Louisiana Cajun Navy" asking for the staging area and Zello channel in order to stay in communication -- they've got a surprisingly sophisticated Internet comm systems in place, with a huge number of volunteers working from home. They even have a dispatch channel on Zello.

As for using the full military in domestic operations (other than the Coast Guard and National Guard), it's worth reading some of the history of the the Posse Comitatus Act (a post-Civil War statute), which was passed to limit the powers of the President to use the military domestically against our own citizens -- though there are some exceptions (including disasters) now:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posse_Comitatus_Act


Thanks for the explanation.

Is it just my computer or did my post get removed?

Kim
 

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Newbie, thank you for posting that. I watched a video of someone on horseback helping to free penned horses withers deep in the flood along with many other vids and footage.

I was brought up to believe that humans are basically good. But sometimes we forget that there is even a deeper side that is selfless and heroic.

Bless those who are affected and those who are helping.
 

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Individuals and groups from my state are sending boats,supplies,and personal to help.Also several animal rescue groups have pooled their resources and are driving down to bring back displaced pets until they can be reunited with their owners.
 

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Individuals and groups from my state are sending boats,supplies,and personal to help.Also several animal rescue groups have pooled their resources and are driving down to bring back displaced pets until they can be reunited with their owners.
That's wonderful! I wish there was something more that I could do, other than pray and donate money. If I tried to go down there and help, somebody would probably just end up having to rescue me..
 

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I really hope there's someone (Austin Pets Alive????) coordinating the exodus. Rushing flood dogs out of state resulted in a pet diaspora in Katrina, and people never found their dogs -- or some spent years trying, and then ended up in a legal tussle to get them back from new owners. Imagine adopting a dog, then getting sued years later, and having to give a now-senior dog back because it was someone else's dog who'd spent years trying to find it -- that happened. These transports set up that mess.

We were lucky to have Katrina veteran shelter directors handling organization for us last year, so it didn't happen again -- people stuck in shelters knew that their pets were not being sent out of state. I'm worried that's not happening in Texas.

Once rescues get dogs out of state, getting them back is not going to be easy. They'll worry whether the owners are good enough, or able to care for the dog well enough, or are really the owners. They mean well, but this sounds like a repeat of the big, big mistakes made during Katrina.

I really wish the Texas authorities would set up something in Austin or Dallas and order that all flood dogs leaving Houston have to go there for holding. It's incredibly important!
 

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The rescue mission I spoke of is bringing back only shelter dogs to make room for the displaced pets who will remain in the state.Sounds like they're doing it right this time!I checked after I saw your post.
 

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I even saw a video today of people out rescuing wildlife. I love seeing the very best in people. I wish we could focus more on the good.
 
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