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I'm thinking ahead-my trails are ice covered so I am not taking anyone biking or jogging, and Jett is too young for any sustained exercise like that (from what I've read).

So, in addition to working on loose-leash walking, what can I work on in a distraction free environment to smooth the way into having a good exercise companion? My last exercise companion learned how to follow me on his own (a deaf Australian Shepherd) so I never had to teach him. `My son runs with our current dog and is fast enough that the dog matches his pace comfortably. I'm very slow now that I'm older and also have never done biking with a dog.

TIA for whatever advice you have to offer!
 

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I tried biking with my dogs last summer, then it got too hot so it didn't last long. That and I don't want my dogs to run on black top the entire time. I held the leash and hooked them to a harness (not the no pull kind). It took them some time to get used to staying with the bike and not bumping into it. It took me some time to find a comfortable speed and deal with stop signs. A running track at a park might be a better place to start. NO traffic or intersections. One tip that worked for me is that I put my bicycle seat all the way down so that I could easily put both feet down on the ground. In fact I basically sat on my seat and "scootered" for awhile. Once we got into a rhythm I put my feet on the pedals.

I can't tell you about running because it would knock me out long before my dogs would even begin to pant ;)
 

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I tried biking with my dogs last summer, then it got too hot so it didn't last long. That and I don't want my dogs to run on black top the entire time. I held the leash and hooked them to a harness (not the no pull kind). It took them some time to get used to staying with the bike and not bumping into it. It took me some time to find a comfortable speed and deal with stop signs. A running track at a park might be a better place to start. NO traffic or intersections. One tip that worked for me is that I put my bicycle seat all the way down so that I could easily put both feet down on the ground. In fact I basically sat on my seat and "scootered" for awhile. Once we got into a rhythm I put my feet on the pedals.

I can't tell you about running because it would knock me out long before my dogs would even begin to pant ;)
Thanks. I'm fortunate to have a loop of 3.5-4 miles (depending on how I get to the loop) that is minimally paved. It's why I bought my house where I did :) I like the tip about the bike seat.

I'm really wondering, though, if there are specific commands I can preteach that will make the transition to biking and/or jogging easier. Watching videos during my "downtime" on a snow day when I spend hours catching up on paperwork!
 

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I'm really wondering, though, if there are specific commands I can preteach that will make the transition to biking and/or jogging easier.



If you haven't started working on lefts, rights, straights, stop, slow, fast etc....you could start all that walking your dog on a 6 foot lead easy enough and get the dog used to your verbal cues before you hit the road on your bike....literally. I wish I would have done this with my first dog.....I'm guessing I provided some serious laughs for my neighbors back then....I went right...dog went left.....dog won...




SuperG
 

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I really liked that video! :)

Especially with the goat and the random extra dogs running around!

I think he did a great job getting his dog used to the bike, he seems to be really good with animals.
 

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For left and right I use the words Left and Right. Some use Haw (left) and Gee (right) which are easier to say when your lips are cold. We practice this with spins (left spin / right spin) and paw lifts (left paw / right paw) and so far it seems to have translated to turning left and right during a walk...but I wouldn't depend on it, yet.

I can see where Stop and Slow would be important as well as something for Keep Going.
 

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Oh, here are the husky "bikejoring" / sled commands by the way:

"Hike!" or "Mush!" or "Alright!" = Go
"Gee" = turn right
"Haw" = turn left
"Whoa..." = Stop
"On by!" = ignore that thing, keep running

I noticed that they all use different vowel sounds (pretty nifty!) so even dogs running upfront & farther away can still easily distinguish what word it is...
i.e. "Go", "slow" and "whoa" would be a confusing combo...:)
 
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