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Discussion Starter #1
I was just curious how to tell if your dog is dominant. I know watching him before we brought Link home that he was not the dominant puppy in his litter. Can they become more dominant once they are away from their litter mates? As they age? Link is almost 6 months old.
 

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I think the answers to most of your questions were answered by Chris Wild on the other thread you started.
My puppy is not much older, and the teen age years have her acting a tad "different" to put it nicely. It's like she is testing her boundaries right now, just like a human teen would. I am just continuing on as if everything is the same, keeping as consistant as I can, continuing her training and taking my concerns to the trainer who I trust, and knowing it will pass.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
But how do you tell if your dog is dominant or submissive. Like I said in his litter he was not the dominant or the submissive he was middle of the road. Does that change when they come home?
 

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Honestly, it's probably safe to assume he is NOT dominant. Very, very few dogs have such dominant personalities that they will challenge humans for position. Even the vast majority of dogs who are dominant toward other dogs, are not that way with humans. This sort of personality would also be very evident in a young pup... and from the sounds of it Link does NOT fit the mold of a dominant dog.

Most dominance/rank issues that occur with dogs are not because of the dog, but because of the humans involved. Not providing clear, consistent , fair leadership, not training, giving the dog mixed signals... all can create a rank issue where otherwise none would exist. All dogs have a strong need to know who is in charge, and what the family hierarchy is. If given good leadership, they will gladly accept it. But if not given clear leadership, they often feel forced to try to take over the leadership roles themselves. Not because they want to be leaders, but because someone has to and if the dog feels the humans aren't stepping up to the plate and suitable for that role, that leaves it up to the dog.

Also, many perfectly normal puppy and adolescent dog behaviors are often mistaken for signs of dominance, causing people to assume there is a dominance issue when none in fact exists.

Your pup should be fine, provided he is given good leadership, clear and fair rules, consistent behavior on your part, and training.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks. Sometimes I wonder with his behaviours. We start Basic Obedience next Tuesday so we are looking forward to that. I just hope that we are giving him everything you say we should with good leadership, clear and fair rules, consistent behaviour and training. We do things like he needs to wait to eat and go out the doors and we do practice what we learnt in Puppy school.
 
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