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Discussion Starter #1
When I taught this to my first dog, I used a pretty harsh method. I basically used a really light long line, started a game of fetch and after a few throws I threw it out of reach. Right before the dog hit the end of the line I yelled stop. It took about three reps.
I justified that it's an emergency command so harsh was ok. And I can tell you that anytime, anywhere, that dog froze when I yelled stop! It saved his butt a couple of times.
There is a nicer way to teach it.
I start on leash. Walk quickly forward with the dog and when you say stop, stop. Reward for it.
The other way is to stand a few feet in front of the dog and call it. When it is almost to you say stop and step forward forcing a stop.
Gradually increase the distance.
What you need to mark and reward is that initial split second of complete immobility when you first say the word.
Once the dog understands what you want you can start with the dog moving away from you.
I use a different tone for this command then any other. I want the dog to get that this is different.
I integrate it into fetch a lot. Throw the ball, stop, bring, stop, bring, out, leave it, come, bring, stop, etc
The only difference between stop, stay or down is that when I say stop it means not one more step. Not one more motion.
In competition down or stay in motion allows for some travel. Yes I do know the faster the better. Stop is not a competition command. I teach it for emergencies. The analogy of the shattered glass was an excellent one. I don't want the dog to down or sit or shift at all. I want it to freeze, because there is shattered glass all around it.
 

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I yelled out but that only took Yoko off the rabbit she was chasing and she returned to me. Sounds kinda like the stand out of motion is what you are trying to achieve.
 

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I had to think about this one a bit when my dog was young. My front yard had no fence, but a rock filled barrier around it, so I used to walk her around it and had used a stop command to let her know not to go into that rock barrier.

Because of that, I worried that trying to morph stop to mean stop or freeze immediately might be confusing.

I used stay for stopping and standing out of motion, but really only from a heel. She knew that well, but I have only used that for stopping and standing from a heel, and for when I want her to remain in a position until released. Not for stopping immediately, unless you consider stopping out of motion while heeling synonymous with remaining in position...maybe?!

In the end, I opted for wait. Interestingly, I have used wait to mean different things in different contexts, and my dog seemed to get it instantly. Wait to get out of the car, even if the door is open; wait to go out the door until released to do so; and wait to greet a newcomer - whether at a dog park or any other off-leash situation.

I was also careful to use wait when I left her in our fenced backyard by herself, as I wanted to clearly differentiate it from stay (in position) so as not to be confusing.

So it seemed wait was my closest command to freeze - which was also a contender because that meant don't move a muscle!

Anyway, the command used doesn't matter as much as being clear about the concept so the dog understands.

I also like to do calisthenics with her, and do them frequently. But she tended, over time, to move a bit closer with each movement. Down, then stand up...three steps closer, sit...three more steps then she sits, then stand...two more...you all get the picture.

Anyway, for me a light long line wrapped around a pole or some other stationary object with me standing in front of her at a distance, such that I could reinforce changing positions without advancing, and enforce wait by stopping her immediately seemed to work well.

Alas, over time she's gotten a little lax on this. She's 3 yrs old, and used to be pretty good at it, but it's been a long winter.

We spent an hour or so at the people park on a long line just today, brushing up ?

And I'm guessing she needs a couple more sessions to rekindle her memory.

Which begs the question, does "training" ever end? Freaking dogs...never a dull moment LOL! Gotta love em! I know I do!!
 

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I taught Samson this from a heel at first.I said 'Stay' and paused.After he caught on it was 'Stay' as I kept walking.Then during fetch,then random times.Next I added a referee whistle along with the 'Stay'.Now he'll stop to either one.I have a couple of videos but I can never get them posted on this site.He also recalls with the whistle.I'll try to post the videos since I haven't tried since the change
over.Ha!I think it worked.This is a practice day at the elementary school,first time away from home.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I yelled out but that only took Yoko off the rabbit she was chasing and she returned to me. Sounds kinda like the stand out of motion is what you are trying to achieve.
I had to think about this one a bit when my dog was young. My front yard had no fence, but a rock filled barrier around it, so I used to walk her around it and had used a stop command to let her know not to go into that rock barrier.

Because of that, I worried that trying to morph stop to mean stop or freeze immediately might be confusing.

I used stay for stopping and standing out of motion, but really only from a heel. She knew that well, but I have only used that for stopping and standing from a heel, and for when I want her to remain in a position until released. Not for stopping immediately, unless you consider stopping out of motion while heeling synonymous with remaining in position...maybe?!

In the end, I opted for wait. Interestingly, I have used wait to mean different things in different contexts, and my dog seemed to get it instantly. Wait to get out of the car, even if the door is open; wait to go out the door until released to do so; and wait to greet a newcomer - whether at a dog park or any other off-leash situation.

I was also careful to use wait when I left her in our fenced backyard by herself, as I wanted to clearly differentiate it from stay (in position) so as not to be confusing.

So it seemed wait was my closest command to freeze - which was also a contender because that meant don't move a muscle!

Anyway, the command used doesn't matter as much as being clear about the concept so the dog understands.

I also like to do calisthenics with her, and do them frequently. But she tended, over time, to move a bit closer with each movement. Down, then stand up...three steps closer, sit...three more steps then she sits, then stand...two more...you all get the picture.

Anyway, for me a light long line wrapped around a pole or some other stationary object with me standing in front of her at a distance, such that I could reinforce changing positions without advancing, and enforce wait by stopping her immediately seemed to work well.

Alas, over time she's gotten a little lax on this. She's 3 yrs old, and used to be pretty good at it, but it's been a long winter.

We spent an hour or so at the people park on a long line just today, brushing up ?

And I'm guessing she needs a couple more sessions to rekindle her memory.

Which begs the question, does "training" ever end? Freaking dogs...never a dull moment LOL! Gotta love em! I know I do!!
One of my very first Shepherds got hit by a car and killed. He had bolted after a squirrel or cat or something and I hollered for him to come. He was on one side of the road, I was on the other. He whipped around and came at me at a dead run. I saw the car.
Stop is a different command then a stay or a stand or a down. I suppose it could be the same thing but stay means stay there. Lay, sit, stand, beg, don't care just stay there. Stand would be useful but would need to be modified, because the way I teach stop it can be used coming or going and it means cease any and all movement RIGHT NOW!
Tim I love the idea of a pole as a fulcrum? of sorts. That is brilliant and shall be incorporated and referred to as Tim's Way henceforth. Many thanks.
 

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Is stop usually in the stand position? Any reason not to teach it as a "platz" at a distance? I have a lot of time now, and this is one I'd like to teach, but I'm curious how it differs from the emergency down and how to teach it so the dog understands the "freeze in place" concept?
 

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Is stop usually in the stand position? Any reason not to teach it as a "platz" at a distance? I have a lot of time now, and this is one I'd like to teach, but I'm curious how it differs from the emergency down and how to teach it so the dog understands the "freeze in place" concept?
I don't think has to be any exact position. It's just stop. Wherever you are, whatever you're doing: stop. (Then again I'm not the xpert here, so I could be wrong.)

It's an opinion. Some like "stop"; some "down" or "platz".

IMO When a dog stops in a stand position he has to slow down, which covers more distance if he's running. But if you teach down, the dog can drop no matter how fast he's going, eliminating all that life or death distance in an emergency situation.
I'm going to teach both, because they both come in handy!
 

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I teach both as well. Think of the broken glass scenario. Last thing you want your dog to do is lie down!
 

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I also like to do calisthenics with her, and do them frequently. But she tended, over time, to move a bit closer with each movement. Down, then stand up...three steps closer, sit...three more steps then she sits, then stand...two more...you all get the picture.
I have experimented with doing our calisthenics at curbs, the front porch just in front of a set of stairs, by one of those cement parking lot dividers, and on a plywood place board. It has reduced the creep but not eliminated it yet on open spaces.

I am also starting to looking getting a stake of some sort so we can do more distance work where a long line might not work as well. That way, I can teether pup a few feet from me to work on staying in place without creeping towards me when he thinks I am not looking.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Is stop usually in the stand position? Any reason not to teach it as a "platz" at a distance? I have a lot of time now, and this is one I'd like to teach, but I'm curious how it differs from the emergency down and how to teach it so the dog understands the "freeze in place" concept?
The way I teach it, it's a freeze command. I have used it any number of times when the last thing I wanted was for the dog to lay down. Crumbling trails, floors caving in, etc. And most recently for...broken glass!
Sabi and I were patrolling in a very hazardous area one night. As we ventured across an old catwalk I heard,and felt, the ominous sound of wood snapping. I said stop and she froze. Since we were closer to the far side and I was concerned about shifting at all I needed her to stay absolutely still while I and my back up assessed.
While out with Bud and Bear one weekend the dogs ventured into an old trail that immediately began to crumble. Because both dogs had been taught stop I was able to freeze them and get ropes around their necks before calling them one at a time out of danger.
Last year I dropped an old Corelle plate. Anyone who has ever broken one of these unbreakable dishes knows how much of a mess that is. Of course, Shadow came to save me. Because she knew stop she stood perfectly still while Jer got shoes and lifted her clear.
 

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I teach both as well. Think of the broken glass scenario. Last thing you want your dog to do is lie down!
Right. In that case you would want a standing stop. Car and dog coming at the same time scenario? You would want a down, because that few extra feet it takes to slow down could be life saving. (and you can't tell the car to stop. :D)
 

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Right. In that case you would want a standing stop. Car and dog coming at the same time scenario? You would want a down, because that few extra feet it takes to slow down could be life saving. (and you can't tell the car to stop. :D)
I think you are confused. Have you ever played red light/green light? I used to ride train and compete with horses. If a horse can stop, so can a dog. I was just recently watching an IGP video from somewhere in which the dog was downed, I believe on a send. Big response from the spectators because yes the dog dropped on a dime, and then slid several feet.
Stop, as I teach and use it, is NOT a competition command.
 

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I haven't started on a 'stop' command, but Ole does like to be recalled when he is in the middle of running at full speed. He plants his front legs in front of him and leans back on his haunches. If it is wet and muddy, he leaves four perfect skid marks where he planted his feet.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
@Muskeg if you start training it on a short recall I found it useful to wait until the dog is just about to you and step right in as you give the command to stop. You need to mark that split second of confused hesitation as your dog wonders if you've lost your mind, lol.
 

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I think you are confused. Have you ever played red light/green light? I used to ride train and compete with horses. If a horse can stop, so can a dog. I was just recently watching an IGP video from somewhere in which the dog was downed, I believe on a send. Big response from the spectators because yes the dog dropped on a dime, and then slid several feet.
Stop, as I teach and use it, is NOT a competition command.
Well...I didn't think I was confused. I know the video you're talking about.
When going that fast--it doesn't matter. But when the dog is casually running to you, then it is opinionated. I don't care who does what, but I do believe down is the safer and faster way to stop, and hey, it saves an extra command when teaching competition style obedience. (but that's not really important.) That's my opinion. You have yours.
 

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Right. In that case you would want a standing stop. Car and dog coming at the same time scenario? You would want a down, because that few extra feet it takes to slow down could be life saving. (and you can't tell the car to stop. :D)
Here's the thing. I was told by someone on the forum that my dog doesn't respect me, strictly because she doesn't do what they've taught their dog to do! I had never asked for or required that behavior from my dog LOL! So the statement doesn't apply.

If you want a behavior from your dog, and actively train for it, and your dog blows it off, then yeah you may have an issue!

Point is, you do what you want with your dog, and I'll do the same with mine. We're both right!

Peace! ?
 

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Hi guys, Mod here, time to chill... consider this your formal warning. If you’re wondering if I’m talking to you, then I probably am.
 

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FWIW, you helpfully opened this thread at my request about how you taught the stop command. Then, I asked a mod to step in by reporting this thread with "I like @Sabis mom a lot but she is losing her cool on this thread."

Any anger or accusations of arrogance should be directed at me. I selfishly need mentors like you to keep me learning.
 

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Come on folks.This is an interesting thread.It's possible to post how and why we teach something without arguing who has the best method.We can decide for ourselves.
@davewis no worries.We all get carried away sometimes.We'll just start over now.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I am not bothered, really. @davewis, lol. I was a teenage girl, I raised a teenage girl. I get irritated when I need to repeat myself. It IS a different command then down and has different applications. I find it useful, others may not.
Tim came up with a genius aid for training this and probably other things to.
 
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