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Hi all,

I have almost found my new pup but, I want to learn some commands that are unusual is that possible when I have my dog?

Like stop jumping, bark [when needed] , stop, pee, poop, turn around.


Any of the owners experience?
 

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I appreciate your desire to teach your pup commands....... however, once you find your new pup......I'd put the majority of your efforts toward creating a bond from day one....you only get one chance.

Making the appropriate connection with a young pup will serve you handsomely over the coming months as you train your dog.

All of the "unusual" commands/behavior you cited can be accomplished as time progresses by capturing/directing the behavior you want and duly noting.....these dogs are smart especially if you make it easy for them to connect the dots.

SuperG
 

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Absolutely.......I preferred hand and body signals versus verbal commands.......I don't know that I did it properly as I first trained the dog via verbal commands and then matched the physical cues to the verbal and then eliminating the verbal commands.....but it all worked out.

GSDs are smart....sometimes too smart.


SuperG
 

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Thank you for the reply. Is it possible to teach hand commands instead of voice? !
teach both. i taught both of my dogs hand signals as their hearing started to go... same can be said for their vision. no reason not to teach both from the beginning.
 

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Hi all,

I have almost found my new pup but, I want to learn some commands that are unusual is that possible when I have my dog?

Like stop jumping, bark [when needed] , stop, pee, poop, turn around.


Any of the owners experience?
Aside from "turn around", those aren't really unusual commands. A lot of people teach them to their dogs.

Stop jumping = "Off" command. To be used whenever dog tries to get on any furniture you don't want them on or jumps on people. Easy to teach and one of those essential for household rules. For jumping, you can walk into the dog, put your knee into the dog, or push the dog sideways with your hand. Say "Off" when you do this, and praise when all four paws are back on the floor.

Bark = "Speak" Say the word when the dog barks and praise. Pair this with "Shh" or "Quiet" so you can have an off switch.

And yes, you can pair just about anything with a hand gesture. We use a closed hand (palm facing down) for sit. An open palm with a downward motion for down. An upraised hand (like you'd do for "Stop!" for people) for stay. A come-along gesture for come.

Dog handlers for dogs in movies use even more subtle gestures. Like a light touch on the head means stay, or a pat means sit. Gestures that aren't obvious to the viewer that the actor can use.
 

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Once you have basic manners solid (including bathroom commands) , you can lure the dog to teach turns/positions/tricks, or you can shape (clicker or marker word), or you can use both.

Luring - holding food in front of the dog's nose to steer the dog into position - is the easiest method for the human.

Shaping encourages and rewards the dog for offering behaviors. You mark/reward when the dog makes incremental progress toward the final goal, eventually assigning it a word or hand signal label. Ultimately I think shaping makes teaching tricks easier, because the dog is thinking. But timing is more important, and a lot of people get impatient and inadvertently bribe (lure) the dog when shaping doesn't go fast enough. :)

These dogs are very intelligent, you should be able to teach everything you listed, and then some.

To turn in a circle, I'd use different commands for turn clockwise and turn counter-clockwise. They learn that very quickly if you make it clear that you won't reward for the wrong direction - only what you ask for. Then you can use that to each other commands where left / right is useful.
 

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Jupiter, and I think most dogs, attend to the body far more easily than the voice. When I taught him the down, he wasn't getting it so I used to use my right forearm to sort of force him that direction. As he learned, I slowly phased out the forearm, but just kind of sticking my elbow out in front of me serves as a hand command that he still knows. Once in a while I use it when he seems to be ignoring or forgetting my "down."
 

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What has been useful is having taught my dog to shake on command when wet. It's nice being able to tell your wet dog to shake before he gets into the car, or comes inside.
 

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dogs prefer body language over voice so teaching that way is easier. Alas, it only works if your dog is actively looking at you. If you use a voice command say it before you do the hand signal. It may help meld them together better.

My GSDs enjoy trick training. Just remember that there size and weight will determine what they feel comfortable doing. Smaller dogs are more agile.
 

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Teaching speak is hard. Kias doesn't bark a lot, which means I'll be waiting a long time to praise him. Any other ways to teach it well that are faster?
 

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Teaching speak is hard. Kias doesn't bark a lot, which means I'll be waiting a long time to praise him. Any other ways to teach it well that are faster?
Back tie him. Get a toy on a string like a flirt pole. Make pray movements, frustrate him. When he barks,
He gets it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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My proudest behavior for Ole is, "Dry your feet." When we come in from outside I taught him to spin around a couple of times on a rug near the front door.

But, to be honest, it is not particularly effective this time of year. When he comes in from playing in the yard, the mud is never limited to the bottom of his feet :(
 
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