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Hi everyone. I have a big problem. My 8 mnths GSD puppy eats my min-pin's poop at every chance he gets. I yelled at him, grabbed him in the neck and said ''nooooooooo''. Since 2 days he has diarrhea and the reason is his poop eating behavior. I always supervise and take off the training pad after my minpin poops, but sometimes just in a sec, poop is eaten. Today, I lost myself and hit him 3 times with my sandal. I'm so sorry and I know this is wrong. But, I'm going crazy. And he growled at me. My GSD never growled at me until now. Why he growled at me? Because I hit him?. If this happens again, how should I correct him?. A friend of mine said ''your dog has no respect to you, if he growls he may also bite you.'' Is this true? Please help me. I don't know how to handle this. Thanks
 

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No hitting, I think you know that already, but please no more of that, you don't want your pup to fear you.

There is a supplement you can add to the dogs food to make it taste awful (you would think poop naturally already does, but some dogs tend not to agree).

Another option is to monitor and control bathroom breaks. I monitored my dog from the beginning because I caught him eating a poop once and I nipped it in the bud as I didn't want it to become a habit. As he drops a log I get it up with the pooper scooper and toss it in my outdoor garbage can. If there is no poop around to eat you have beaten the problem by 90%.
 

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I agree no hitting.

I have tried all the "stop-poop eating" supplements they make and have never worked.

My dog has been addicted to poop-eating since puppyhood, and has since taught my other dogs to do it too so now I have 3 poop eaters.

Your best bet is just make sure it's picked up. It sucks I know because it seems like a lot of my day is spent of poop patrol, but if it's not sitting around they can't eat it.
 

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Bluewolf is right, punishment of any kind is not the answer. This is a management issue - you need to be there and prevent him from getting at it, not smacking him after the fact. Making it taste nasty with supplements is only part of the solution. Teach him to sit or down until released and all you have to do is make him stay there while you clean up the poop. If he gets up, body block him and back him up, putting him back in place. Do this as many times as necessary until he'll stay while you pick up the pad. Give him a small treat and enthusiastic praise, then release him.

I put my dogs in a down stay with their food bowls right under their noses and they'll stay there and not eat, even if I leave the room briefly, until I give the release. I started slowly, putting them in a sit and releasing them the second I set the bowl down and took my hands off it, and worked up to being able to stand up, and then to back a few feet away before releasing them to eat. If they broke the sit I picked the bowl back up and waited for them to sit again. I gradually made it more and more challenging so that now the food is actually within reach without getting up, but they know I'll take it away if they try to eat before I tell them they can. They figure it out much faster than you'd think as long as you're patient and persistent, and you don't need to yell at him or punish him in any way, you're simply withholding something he wants until he follows the rules.

This is exactly the kind of thing you can do with the training pads, and I'd recommend doing it with his meals too. Start slow and easy, and reward him for staying put. In the case of meals getting to eat is the reward, with the poop thing you'll need a food reward - make it worth his while to do what you ask. Eventually you can start phasing out and then eliminating the treat, but keep up the happy praise.
 

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Ahh the things we learn to live with when we have dogs.

I have one that will sometimes eats poop at night


So when he comes roaring into the house with poop breath, I give a cookie and make him drink water before he can accidentally touch me with his mouth. ewwwwwwwwwwww

Because I know he does not have any health issue to cause this I just shrug it off and pick up the poop as fast as I can.

IMO losing your temper with your dog is the worst thing that you can do. If you don't like a certain behavior you must CALMLY find a way to fix it.

I would also suggest getting into some training with the dog if you have not already done so,(the leave it command is wonderful) poop eating is the least of the issues that I have with my dogs.

What are you going to do when bigger issues come up?
And yes he probably did growl at you because you hit him with your shoe!! And yes maybe he does not have any respect for you BUT respect and fear are two totally different things.
If it's respect your going for you really need to change some things, but if it's fear, you are on the right track.
 

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I know how difficult this can be....Eli did this alot as a pup and I found it soooo discusting, but as others have said and I think you know it, don't hit your dog. Eli has began to outgrow this 'habit' but occassionally he regresses....I agree, the best you can do is to pick up the poop as quick as you can and try to take this all in stride.
He likely growled at you because you hit him. Physical force doesn't help when you are trying to build a bond between you and your pup. Try not to repond in anger and good luck. If he turns out anything like Eli has then you've got a real winner of a dog.
Rosa
 

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For the poop eating, it's sort of a normal thing for dogs to do. Some do, some don't. To us it's disgusting, to them it's not. They'll eat all manner of poop from all manner of different animals.

Punishing isn't the way to solve the problem. Prevention is. If the poop isn't there, he can't eat it. Work to manage the dogs better to prevent him from having the opportunity to eat it.

There are also supplements you can add to their food that make the poop unpalatable to dogs, and thus discourages them from eating it. Those need to be given to the dog who's poop is being eaten, not the poop eater. Though it's a good idea to give to both as some dogs will also eat their own poop.

Originally Posted By: VALIUM And he growled at me. My GSD never growled at me until now. Why he growled at me? Because I hit him?. If this happens again, how should I correct him?. A friend of mine said ''your dog has no respect to you, if he growls he may also bite you.'' Is this true? Please help me. I don't know how to handle this. Thanks
Yes. He growled at you because you attacked him, and he was defending himself. If he feels the need to defend himself from you, he may bite. And he would be justified in doing so. Not only is your attack inappropriate behavior on your part, but when being attacked he really has has no other choice but to defend himself.

If someone hit you, would you not yell at them? If they persisted, would you not hit back to defend yourself?

Be thankful he showed restraint and growled in warning first, and gave you a chance to heed that warning before escalating his behavior to biting.

It's not a respect issue, it's a natural reaction to a threat.

Losing your temper and hitting your dog are two of the absolute worst things you can do. This will teach your dog to fear you, and will hinder any attempts to build a good relationship with him based upon trust and respect.
 

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Ugh. My dog does this with her own poop sometimes. Just when I think she has stopped doing it, there she goes again. The worst is with the cats' litter pan. If I, or my daughters, do not make sure she has no access to it, she will come romping out with cat poop in her mouth. I get so sick! But, its like with most things...if we do not stay on the ball, she does it.
 

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I'll never hit him again..never, but He gets diarrhea after poop eating. I'm gonna try to be more careful..supervise my minpin more often..Thank you. I feel so sorry to hit him. I have to make him feel better more than ever today I guess. Anyhow, thanks so much.
 

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From a friend:

Quote:OK, ladies...I'm going to share a little secret. The best way to stop poop eating is to go to the store and buy a couple of boxes of regular old Fig Newtons. Give the dogs each one a day. In about 3 days, no more poop eating. If you get to the 4th or 5th day and the problem dog is still eating poop, give that one two Fig Newtons. That ought to solve the problem.
Never tried it myself and I have no idea how it works, but she swears by this method!
 

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Everybody makes mistakes- you owned it and will not do it again. That's something to be proud of, not ashamed of. Go easy on yourself- and just be a good leader to him. If you get all mushy and guilty feeling that won't help either. He won't understand that you must be expressing regret because you hit him- he'll just see it as weakness. Just learn to be a good leader- I'm learning that myself, and when I do it right things just seem to go along pretty smoothly- but it is taking work..... classes as well as lots of reading.
 

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I understand the poop eating - but why do some dogs eat dirt? When I catch her and say leave it, she will. She comes in the house and stomps her feet.
 

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How about scooping IMMEDIATELY after each poop? As soon as your minpin lifts its butt, you dive in to scoop. Same with your GSD. If it's not there, it cannot become a habit in the first place. Simple.
No hitting involved, either! I am glad you will stop the hitting. This will be very very good. Do lots of positive training now, your pup is just a baby!

LJsMom, some dogs may eat dirt because they feel they are lacking some minerals in their diet. What kind of food are you feeding?
 

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Let's put a leash on that GSD pup. For now, tether your pup to your belt as you go about the house and as you go about your day (when he's not crated). This way, he can be out and about, but YOU control where he is and what he's doing, not his little poop-snacking brain.

If you need to work somewhere where he can't be underfoot -- say you're making dinner, I'm a big fan of tethering. Take a leash (nylon is good) and tie it to something really heavy. I used the leg of our sofa or the supports for our hearth. Clear EVERYTHING out of the way that you don't want puppy to get into, but leave him one or two toys that he can play with. Now, tether him there. Be sure that he can see you, or go into the room often enough to say "hi," so he doesn't feel like he's been exiled into Siberia. Every once in a while, when he's nice and quiet, walk over to him; tell him he's a good guy; pet him and give him a snack. You can even sit with him a while and play with him there before you continue about your day. As dog owners, we often forget to to reward this good behavior, but we sure jump when we see bad behavior. Part of strong puppy management is to reinforce good behavior.

Now, you can do whatever you want, whenever you want. He has a lot of free space, since he's not in his crate all the time. Importantly, YOU are MANAGING him. A puppy that isn't getting into trouble is a puppy that isn't being disciplined. That is fertile ground for a happy relationship.

I use tethering a lot. It says to my dog "you need to stay here and chill. You're not in trouble, but I want you over here." It allows me to *manage* a house full of dogs. With puppies, tethering to my belt is particularly useful becuase they really learn to behave calmly around humans and in a wide variety of situations. But I think that you might find both of these options helpful.

Good luck.


LJsMom, many pups eat dirt because they just like to eat dirt, despite a perfectly balanced diet. Some prefer sand. Some adore pebbles/gravel. My guy loved rich composty top soil. Many (though not all) outgrow it. If you're feeding a high quality diet, and your dog is otherwise healthy, the best approach is management.

Try to keep your dog away from the kind of dirt she likes the best. I know, that sounds easier than it is. We walked my dog on a leash to the grassy area in our yard, or we made it a game to SPRINT from the grass into the house (across the flower gardens, location of his favorite varietal of dirt), and when he did that, he got a treat in the house, which made sprinting that much more fun. Also, keep delicious treats in your pocket and do "the Upgrade Game." As soon as you see your pup going headfirst into dirt, rush over and offer, at nose level, a wonderful-smelling treat (this isn't time to be offering kibble bits or biscuity treats). She'll likely spit out the dirt for the treat. Remember, you're not rewarding eating dirt; you're rewarding spitting out dirt. After a while, she'll probably get the hang of Upgrading and eat less dirt each time. My guy did!
 

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Lady Jane was 10 when we took her in. She came with instructions from her vet that she must only be fed Science Diet. She has EPI. After a couple months we started feeding her high quality kibble but the dirt eating continued. I suspect that its habit now. She's sneaky - she doesn't like anyone to see her when she poops so I figure she's off pooping in privacy but she's really scratching around in the dirt.

We had a husky that ate rocks in his younger days. He couldn't pass them and had to have 3 rock removal surgeries. I still can't believe he lived to be a very old pup. Life is very dull without him!
 

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Originally Posted By: Cassidys Mom
I put my dogs in a down stay with their food bowls right under their noses and they'll stay there and not eat, even if I leave the room briefly, until I give the release. I started slowly, putting them in a sit and releasing them the second I set the bowl down and took my hands off it, and worked up to being able to stand up, and then to back a few feet away before releasing them to eat. If they broke the sit I picked the bowl back up and waited for them to sit again.
I'm so proud of my pup, I've been practicing this with him for several days now and he now will sit and stay until I release him to eat with "Ok" , granted it's only about 3 seconds before he begins to fidget, but it's a start!
 

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Good work Bluewolf, that's exactly how you start! If he's holding that stay for a nanosecond before you release him, that's enough at first. Just very gradually start increasing the time, and also the distance both he and you are from the bowl. Initially, I put the bowl several feet away, and I was right there so I could quickly pick it back up, but then I started nudging the bowl closer to the dog and moving myself further away. It took a long time to get to where we are now. I was so proud of Keefer (who is about as food obsessed as a dog could possibly be) when I was able to close the door of the garage pen where I feed the dogs, with me on the other side, that I had to take a picture! Terrible quality picture, but this was 2 days before his 5 month birthday:



He could easily have started eating before I could have stopped him. I still do it every day, in a down with the bowl right under their noses, but I usually release them after a few seconds. Sometimes I'll dish up the cats canned food and bring it in the house and come back before releasing the dogs, or take their water dish into the house and refill it.

We used to do this with Cassidy too, and at one point we were catless after my old girl Punkin had died and before I got Elvis, so we left the door from the garage into the house most of the time. (Can't do that now because the cats will use the dog door to go outside!) I left her out there and came into the house for a couple of minutes. She broke her sit, but did not eat - she came into the house looking for me to see if I'd forgotten about her out there!


Anyway, a bit OT, but it's a great exercise to teach puppies self control and patience.
 

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I agree about the not hitting.

Since you are picking up the poop from the training pad I assume the Min Pin just uses the pads and doesn't go outside? If so I would look to moving the pad to an area that ONLY the Min Pin has access too. A gate across the bathroom but pulled out at the corner so the Min Pin can slip in behind the gate. If this is the case the GSD could be just trying to keep the den clean.
 
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