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Baron and I took our first walk around the neighborhood this past Saturday. He did absolutely wonderful. I had him sit on the grass every time a vehicle passed. He stayed beside me the entire time and was taking in all the different smells. I must brag on him!


Now, back to the main reason for my post. We passed by several houses that have other dogs, big and small, and one in particular made me a tad nervous. It was a dog that could have easily jumped the four foot tall, give or take, chain-link fence that was keeping him contained. He charged the gate, got up on his hind legs, and of course barked. At the time I was thinking "what if he jumps the fence and attacks Baron?". So as calmly as I could we just kept on going. The dog did not sound like he wanted to tear us apart, but he still caught me off guard and I guess the way he jumped on the fence made me nervous. Regardless, what I would like to know is if we end up in a situation where he is being attacked, what can I do prior to it happening or what should I do if it does?


I've been learning how to better read a dogs body language, and I still need to perfect it. From what I can recall Baron wasn't showing any aggression, nor was he cowering. He was just looking to see what the commotion was, lol. Also, the other dog was just barking like regular, tail down and not stiff. It was the first initial bark that jolted me.


Thank you in advanced for any help! :grin2:


I've added a recent pic of Baron. He will be 6 months old Friday 6/17/16. :grin2:
 

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I always carry a walking stick, asp, or some other type of protection with me. Where I live there is no leash law so roaming dogs are common place.
Most situations, however, require only your presence. Teach a strong leave it and stay for your dog. Put him in a sit (or at least keep him by your side and controlled) and step out and say "Go home!" in a loud authoritative voice. That is often all that is required.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I always carry a walking stick, asp, or some other type of protection with me. Where I live there is no leash law so roaming dogs are common place.
Most situations, however, require only your presence. Teach a strong leave it and stay for your dog. Put him in a sit (or at least keep him by your side and controlled) and step out and say "Go home!" in a loud authoritative voice. That is often all that is required.
Thank you! I wish I had brought something for protection just in case. It was a spur of the moment, "I'm tired of sitting around so let's go for a walk" kind of deal. I know better and so next time we will leave the house with something. I was told to take mace but that is only of use if there is no wind or it's blowing in the right direction.
 

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and mace won't work on all dogs unless you get something really powerful.
presence is enough in most cases. I would avoid air horns or other methods that could potentially frighten your dog as much as the approaching one.
 

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That four foot fence ... now you know ... most likely "that" particular dog "won't" go over the fence?? Most likely he does that kinda crazy crap all the time?? But you should be looking for stuff like that and the best course of action ... is to "cross the street." It is "always" best to avoid problems through "SA ... Situational Awareness." Head up, scan forward and back be aware and even then you can still be taken by surprise!

And "Air Horns" are a "viable" deterrent if your concerned about your dogs reaction ... then condition him to the sound. That said this is what others do.:

http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/aggression-good-bad-ugly/399201-what-do-if-another-dog-attacks-your-while-leash.html

Welcome aboard and as always ask questions ... oh and handsome boy you have there ... but of course I'm biased. :p
 

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Not to diminish your proactive concerns......but I think it's awesome your pup was calm, cool and collected I assume ...since the only trepidation cited was perhaps your own. Nothing wrong with having a plan B,C and D but keep that pup confident with the proper state of your mindset as you tread in those waters.

However...when an overly aggressive dog cleared a fence and charged my pup at that time in her life....I had no compunction whatsoever protecting my dog....I gave her maneuvering room by dropping the leash when the encounter was inevitable and took a position in front of my dog and proceeded from there. I think whatever measures you might choose to protect your interests at that point are all appropriate...as ugly as some might view it.


SuperG
 

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I carry mace (the brand postal carriers use) a MARINE air horn and now, a break stick.

I was very concerned when my pup was young. Now, she's 2 and with most dogs her size or larger... I will be inclined to drop the leash and let her protect herself. I have conditioned her to the air horn and that won't spook her off in to running away into the wild blue...she knows the sound came from me and I told her it's ok, but most likely the aggressor dog won't be, so that is a deterrent.

It is only if she encounters a dog that seems to be bent on more than a normal skirmish and won't let go - that I will employ deadly force. Unfortunately, that is a possibility.
 

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A break stick requires a little skill to use, it is not the easiest thing to employ in the midst of a dog fight. Especially, if you are planning on using it on a strange dog and not your own. I have used one, we train for it and I carry a special tool that is designed to take a dog off a bite. We use it for removing a dog off a bite to a person, our primary concern. It is not something that I would recommend for a pet owner, there are other ways to break up a dog fight that are safer.

The OC spray, "mace" is not really used any more is a good idea, granted the wind is not blowing in your direction. You could wind up with a face full of OC or others trying to help could get sprayed. Then none of you will much help, if you haven't been exposed to OC before. The air horn will probably distract the vast majority of dogs, a very good idea.

Be very careful with a break stick, especially if it is the size of a tent stake. If it has a sharp end you can seriously damage the dog's olfactory senses.

A break stick for placebo effect, making the handler feel better is great. In actual use, you could get bit really badly and even lose a finger or two.

JMO, FWIW
 

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Stonevintage;7944521 I was very concerned when my pup was young. Now said:
just be aware that, if you do this, YOU will be cited for an out-of-control dog as well. And, if something were to happen, your girl could face euthanasia as well since she is a "dog at large" the second you drop the leash.

Especially if she does what many dogs would do and chases after the offender if they back off the fight.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
and mace won't work on all dogs unless you get something really powerful.
presence is enough in most cases. I would avoid air horns or other methods that could potentially frighten your dog as much as the approaching one.
That four foot fence ... now you know ... most likely "that" particular dog "won't" go over the fence?? Most likely he does that kinda crazy crap all the time?? But you should be looking for stuff like that and the best course of action ... is to "cross the street." It is "always" best to avoid problems through "SA ... Situational Awareness." Head up, scan forward and back be aware and even then you can still be taken by surprise!

And "Air Horns" are a "viable" deterrent if your concerned about your dogs reaction ... then condition him to the sound. That said this is what others do.:

http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/aggression-good-bad-ugly/399201-what-do-if-another-dog-attacks-your-while-leash.html

Welcome aboard and as always ask questions ... oh and handsome boy you have there ... but of course I'm biased. :p
Not to diminish your proactive concerns......but I think it's awesome your pup was calm, cool and collected I assume ...since the only trepidation cited was perhaps your own. Nothing wrong with having a plan B,C and D but keep that pup confident with the proper state of your mindset as you tread in those waters.

However...when an overly aggressive dog cleared a fence and charged my pup at that time in her life....I had no compunction whatsoever protecting my dog....I gave her maneuvering room by dropping the leash when the encounter was inevitable and took a position in front of my dog and proceeded from there. I think whatever measures you might choose to protect your interests at that point are all appropriate...as ugly as some might view it.


SuperG
I carry mace (the brand postal carriers use) a MARINE air horn and now, a break stick.

I was very concerned when my pup was young. Now, she's 2 and with most dogs her size or larger... I will be inclined to drop the leash and let her protect herself. I have conditioned her to the air horn and that won't spook her off in to running away into the wild blue...she knows the sound came from me and I told her it's ok, but most likely the aggressor dog won't be, so that is a deterrent.

It is only if she encounters a dog that seems to be bent on more than a normal skirmish and won't let go - that I will employ deadly force. Unfortunately, that is a possibility.
A break stick requires a little skill to use, it is not the easiest thing to employ in the midst of a dog fight. Especially, if you are planning on using it on a strange dog and not your own. I have used one, we train for it and I carry a special tool that is designed to take a dog off a bite. We use it for removing a dog off a bite to a person, our primary concern. It is not something that I would recommend for a pet owner, there are other ways to break up a dog fight that are safer.

The OC spray, "mace" is not really used any more is a good idea, granted the wind is not blowing in your direction. You could wind up with a face full of OC or others trying to help could get sprayed. Then none of you will much help, if you haven't been exposed to OC before. The air horn will probably distract the vast majority of dogs, a very good idea.

Be very careful with a break stick, especially if it is the size of a tent stake. If it has a sharp end you can seriously damage the dog's olfactory senses.

A break stick for placebo effect, making the handler feel better is great. In actual use, you could get bit really badly and even lose a finger or two.

JMO, FWIW

Thank you all! My main concern with mace is that I have never used it and you cannot control what the wind will do, lol. The horn is an idea. The breeder we got him from conditioned him to sounds since the time they were born. Nothing seems to scare him, except a plastic bag. I found that out when I shook one out and he was standing close, then I felt bad haha. Myself and my family are pro-gun and he has been conditioned to them. First time we had him around us while at the range, he was on leash of course, my dad shot a huge caliber gun that made a loud boom and he didn't even flinch. We were maybe 30 yards away from him. Made me proud. :grin2:


Chip18 I am definitely walking on the other side of the street from now on, lol. It was both our first time walking in the neighborhood, we just moved in December 2015 and got him in late February. But now I know, lol. And thank you! Before his ears were up people kept asking if he was a lab. I was like nope, black GSD. I always got the response "I didn't know there were black GSD" Then I explained to them the various color patterns other than black and tan, lol. Now I get "Is that a wolf?" :laugh2:


SuperG yes he was super calm and kept his cool! Proud mom moment, lol. I tried to keep myself in check and just remove us from that situation as fast as I could without alerting him to my emotions, even though he probably already knew, lol.
 

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In Wyoming we had many dogs charge us. We survived. Pretty much intact. A few scratches. I called the people after the second encounter with their dog(s). And that usually took care of it. I've posted before on one case where the owner did not correct the problem. As his dogs came over the fence and climb all over mine for something like the third time, I chased them off and was fortunate to encounter LE just coming down the road. This is my favorite story --- I ID'd the dogs, pointed to where they came from and never had a problem again - those dogs were confined to the back yard after this.
 

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Before his ears were up people kept asking if he was a lab. I was like nope, black GSD. I always got the response "I didn't know there were black GSD" Then I explained to them the various color patterns other than black and tan, lol. Now I get "Is that a wolf?" :laugh2:
LOL the "Wolf" thing ... I get that one also and "Rocky" is a big dog. OS WL GSD 116 lbs most people stand a "respectful" distance from us if they want to speak.

Still ... I was stunned by a pre teen once on a walk, he stopped "ius" to ask about "Rocky" of course the "expected" Is he a Wolf" question, I said no hes a "Dog." The child pauses ... thinks ... and then ask ..."Is he a werewolf??" I was stunned but I said "No not that am I aware of, he's been with me on full Moons and nothing changes. Out of the mouth of babes as they say. :)
 

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Still ... I was stunned by a pre teen once on a walk, he stopped "ius" to ask about "Rocky" of course the "expected" Is he a Wolf" question, I said no hes a "Dog." The child pauses ... thinks ... and then ask ..."Is he a werewolf??" I was stunned but I said "No not that am I aware of, he's been with me on full Moons and nothing changes. Out of the mouth of babes as they say. :)
we had a super excited little girl, maybe 5 years old, yelling "OMG look at the werewolf!!" at Singe. She was ecstatic
to see a real life werewolf
 

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I tried to keep myself in check and just remove us from that situation as fast as I could without alerting him to my emotions, even though he probably already knew, lol.
Without a doubt....of the many things I have learned...and am still learning about this breed....they really "see" to the core of our certain emotions...sometimes that's a good thing...sometimes not so good. One thing is for sure.....there's no faking it ...these dogs are perceptive.

Your comment " he was super calm and kept his cool!"....huge plus....preserve that as best you can ...even if it means you having to reshape your emotions in certain situations. My dogs over the decades have taught me this....my uber vigilance used to get the better of me...my first GSD spelled it out to me.....her successors have all benefited as have I.

You got a great pup and 6 months is an exciting time....many things you do today and in the very near future will shape years of behaviors ....have fun and enjoy.

SuperG
 

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I think you should feel very proud of him for the way he acted. I believe that shows he is confident, not afraid nor letting any emotion control his actions and his keeping calm and cool. Sounds like a quality bred shepherd with sound temperament!

I know how you feel though. I don't have a yard so I'm always taking mine on walks so I've had many many encounters just like you had. One thing I would ALWAYS keep in mind before you walk out the door is to be in control of YOUR dog the whole walk. If anything happens you want to make sure that your not the liable one for legally "not being in control of your dog," especially with a nice german shepherd like yours.

The many times I've had peoples mutts run up to us for being unleashed, them not paying attention etc. I always make sure I'm calm first then I will put myself between my dog(s) and contain.

As long as I know I am in the right and my dogs are at no fault I'll do what I need to do to protect them.
 

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LOL the "Wolf" thing ... I get that one also and "Rocky" is a big dog. OS WL GSD 116 lbs most people stand a "respectful" distance from us if they want to speak.

Still ... I was stunned by a pre teen once on a walk, he stopped "ius" to ask about "Rocky" of course the "expected" Is he a Wolf" question, I said no hes a "Dog." The child pauses ... thinks ... and then ask ..."Is he a werewolf??" I was stunned but I said "No not that am I aware of, he's been with me on full Moons and nothing changes. Out of the mouth of babes as they say. :)
Oh my gosh! "Is he a werewolf??" That is hilarious!! Baron loves people especially kids and other dogs. My dad told me not long ago while we were at his house that it's almost impossible to break Baron's attention when he's zoned in on something/someone. We have a few issues with social situations because he gets so consumed by everything and wants to lick you to death, which of course is normal. He is still a puppy, lol. When we were walking, we passed by some adults and a couple of small children and the kids started backing away. Baron was staring intensely but never tried going towards them or anything. He had relaxed posture even. I guess his stare and the way he looks made them a tad scared lol. Funny thing is the breeder was an animal behaviorists for 30+ years and said he was low to medium drive. He's West German SL. He's our first GSD and I'm glad I researched because I don't think I could handle one with a higher drive, lol. Maybe one day when I'm more experienced with the breed! I wouldn't trade Baron for all the money in the world!
 

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Without a doubt....of the many things I have learned...and am still learning about this breed....they really "see" to the core of our certain emotions...sometimes that's a good thing...sometimes not so good. One thing is for sure.....there's no faking it ...these dogs are perceptive.

Your comment " he was super calm and kept his cool!"....huge plus....preserve that as best you can ...even if it means you having to reshape your emotions in certain situations. My dogs over the decades have taught me this....my uber vigilance used to get the better of me...my first GSD spelled it out to me.....her successors have all benefited as have I.

You got a great pup and 6 months is an exciting time....many things you do today and in the very near future will shape years of behaviors ....have fun and enjoy.

SuperG
Thank you for the encouragement! He is such an amazing dog! All my life I have had a dog; labs, shelties, dachshunds, boxers, Siberian husky and mixed breeds. He comes in a close tie with my sheltie that passed a couple of years ago. I swear that dog was human reincarnated into him. I feel like the GSD is just MY breed lol. He is definitely the one that will help me master my poker face lol! I finally have found a group training class that I am enrolling him into! It's perfect!
 

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Stone, if you drop the leash, both can get entangled in it. I bought an airhorn for the same purpose. How did conditioning go? Mine is pretty big and I would love to have a pocket-sized one. I always carry Direct Stop (citronella)
 

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I think you should feel very proud of him for the way he acted. I believe that shows he is confident, not afraid nor letting any emotion control his actions and his keeping calm and cool. Sounds like a quality bred shepherd with sound temperament!

I know how you feel though. I don't have a yard so I'm always taking mine on walks so I've had many many encounters just like you had. One thing I would ALWAYS keep in mind before you walk out the door is to be in control of YOUR dog the whole walk. If anything happens you want to make sure that your not the liable one for legally "not being in control of your dog," especially with a nice german shepherd like yours.



The many times I've had peoples mutts run up to us for being unleashed, them not paying attention etc. I always make sure I'm calm first then I will put myself between my dog(s) and contain.

As long as I know I am in the right and my dogs are at no fault I'll do what I need to do to protect them.

Thank you for the sound advice!! He definitely was getting treats as we left the situation! Completely agree with you on total control of him! Unfortunately there are still some people that breed discriminate the GSD. Funny thing, prior to us getting him I was talking about looking for a GSD with my best friend. She was of course telling me some negative things about them, but added that it's all in the way you treat them. I guess the look on my face had her trying to recover, lol. What is even funnier, she has 3 pitbulls which are currently the most discriminated against breed. I just let the negative roll off my shoulders.
 
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